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Home > Bibliography > Bibliography: Simulations

"Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being or a substance. It is the generation by models of a real without origin or reality: a hyperreal. The territory no longer precedes the map, nor survives it. Henceforth, it is the map that precedes the territory - PRECESSION OF SIMULACRA - it is the map that engenders the territory and if we were to revive the fable today, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map. It is the real, and not the map, whose vestiges subsist here and there, in the deserts which are no longer those of the Empire, but our own. <i>The desert of the real itself.</i>" p20


"Disneyland is there to conceal the fact that it is the 'real' country, all of 'real' America, which <i>is</i> Disnelyand (just as prisons are there to conceal the fact that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, which is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, when in fact all of Los Angeles and the America surrounding it are no longer real, but of the order of the hyperreal and of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology), but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle." p25


"Illusion is no longer possible, because the real is no longer possible." p38


"Simulation is infinitely more dangerous, however, since it always suggests, over and above its object, that <i>law and order themselves might really be nothing more than simulation.</i>" p38


"<p>When it is threatened today by simulation (the threat of vanishing in the play of signs), power risks the real, risks crisis, it gambles on remanufacturing artificial, social, economic, political stakes. This is a question of life or death for it. But it is too late. </p><p> Whence the characteristic hysteria of our time: the hysteria of production and reproduction of the real. The other production, that of goods and commodities, that of <i>la belle epoque</i> of political economy, no longer makes any sense of it's own, and has not for some time. What society seeks through production, and overproduction, is the restoration of the real which escapes it. <p>" p44


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