EM W RN

Early Modern
Women's
Research Network

Mary Wroth

Contributor: Professor Paul Salzman

Permissions: Huntington images and transcript: HM600 "Love's Victory". Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, San Marino, California.

Love's Victory

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Images Transcription Modernisation Annotation Collation

Images Transcription Modernization Annotation Collation

In keeping with the purposes of this edition I have very lightly annotated. Excellent annotations are available in the Cerasano and Wynne-Davies edition in Renaissance Drama by Women and in my own edition in Early Modern Women's Writing : An Anthology.

Venus and Cupid*: The Penshurst MS begins like a Jacobean masque with venus and Cupid appearing, and Venus precipitating the action (as she does the denouement in Penshurst). In Huntington their role is diminished, even taking into account the missing last section of Act Five.

[ Venus and Cupid* wt her in her

Temple, her priest attendinge

her

Venus

Cupid, me thinks wee have too long bin still

and that these people grow to ∫corne owr will.

mercy to tho∫e ungrateful breeds neglect,

then let us grow owr greatnes to re∫pect.

make them acknowledg that owr heau'nly power

can nott theyr strength butt even them∫elves devowre.

Lett them nott ∫mile and laugh becau∫e thine eyes

are cover'd, as if blind or love dispi∫e.

noe, thou Yt ∫car∫e shallt from thine eyes take of

wch gave them cau∫e on thee to make this ∫coff.

thou shalt di∫cerne theyr harts, and make them know

that humble homage unto thee they owe.

take thou the shaft wch headed is wt steele

and make them bowe who∫e thoughts did lately reele.

make them thine owne, thou who did'st mee once harme,

Can nott forgett the fury of that charme.

wound them butt kill them nott, so may they live

to honor thee, and thankfulness to give.

shun noe great cro∫s wch may theyr cro∫ses breed

butt yett lett blest inioying them ∫ucceed.

griefe is ∫ufficient to declare thy might,

and in they mercy glory will shine bright.

Cupid

Mother, I will noe cro∫s, noe harme forbeare,

of jealousy for lo∫s, of grief or feare

wch may my honor touch'd again repaire,

butt wth theyr ∫orrows will my glory reare.

freinds shall mistrust theyr freinds, louers mistake,

and all shall for theyr folly woes partake.

∫ome shall loue much yett shall noe loue inioye;

others obtaine when lost is all theyr ioye.

this will I doe, your will and mind to ∫erve,

and to your triumph will these rites pre∫erve.

Venus

Then shall wee have gain owr ancient glory

and lett this called bee louse victory.

triumphs upon theyr travells shall a∫send,

and yet most happy ere they come to end,

Cu:

Ioy and inioying on ∫ome shalbee ∫ett

∫orrow on others caught by Cupids nett : /]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Loues Victorie ƒ

Phili∫ses

You plea∫ant floury meade

wch I did once well loue

your pathes noe more I'le tread

your plea∫ures noe more proue

your beauty more word admire

your coulers more adore

nor gras wt daintiest store

of ∫weets to breed word de∫ire,

Walks once ∫oe ∫ought for now

I shunn you for the darcke,

birds to who∫e ∫ong did bow

my eares your notes nere mark;

brooke wch ∫oe plea∫ing was

vpon who∫e banks I lay,

and on my pipe did play

now, vnreguarded pa∫s,

Meadowes, pathes, gra∫s, flouers

walkes, birds, brooke, truly finde

all proue butt as Vaine shouers

wish'd wellcome els vnkind:

you once I loued best

butt loue makes mee you leaue

by loue I loue de∫eaue

Ioy's lost for liues vnrest

Ioy's lost for liues vnrest indeed I ∫ee

alas poore sheapheard mi∫erable mee

Yett faire Mu∫ella loue, and worthy bee

I blame thee nott, butt mine owne mi∫erie

liue you still hapy, and inioy your loue,

and lett loues paine in mee destre∫sed moue

for ∫ince itt is my freind thou doest affect

then wrong him once my ∫elf I will neglect,

and thus in ∫ecrett will my pa∫sion hide

till time, or fortune doth my feare de∫ide

making my loue apeere as the bright morne,

wthout, or mist, or cloud, but truly borne,

Li∫sius

Ioyfull plea∫ant spring

wch comforts to vs bring

flourish in yor pride

neuer lett decay

your delights alay

∫ince ioye is to you ti'de,

Phi:

Noe ioye is tide to you, you t'is doe proue

the plea∫ure of your freinds vnhapy loue

t'is you enioy the comfort of my paine,

t'is I that loue, and you that loue obtaine,

Li∫sius,

Lett noe frost nor wind

your dainty coulers blind

butt rather cherish

your most plea∫ing ∫ight

lett neuer winter bite

nor ∫ea∫on perish

Phi:

Love's Victory

Act One

Philisses:

You pleasant flow'ry mead

Which I did once well love,

your paths no more I'll tread,

your pleasures no more prove,

your beauty more admire,

your colours more adore,

nor grass with daintiest store

of sweets to breed desire.

Walks once so sought for now

I shun you for the dark,

birds to whose song did bow,

my ears your notes ne'er mark;

brook which so pleasing was

upon whose banks I lay,

and on my pipe did play,

now, unregarded pass.

Meadows, paths, grass, flowers,

walks, birds, brook, truly find

all prove but as vain showers

wished welcome, else unkind.

You once I loved best

but love makes me you leave,

by love I love deceive.

Joy's lost for lives unrest, indeed I see,

Alas, poor shepherd, miserable me.

Yet fair Musella love, and worthy be:

I blame thee not, but mine own misery;

live you still happy, and enjoy your love,

and let love's pain in me distressed move,

for since it is my friend thou dost affect

than wrong him once, myself I will neglect,

and thus in secret will my passion hide

till time, or fortune doth my fear decide,

making my love appear as the bright morn,

without or mist, or cloud, but truly borne.

[Enter Lissius]

Lissius:

Joyful pleasant spring

which comforts to us bring

flourish in your pride;

never let decay

your delights allay

since joy is to you tied.

Philisses: No joy is tied to you, you 'tis do prove

the pleasure of your friend's unhappy love;

'tis you enjoy the comfort of my pain,

'tis I that love, and you that love obtain.

Lissius:

Let no frost nor wind

your dainty colours blind,

but rather cherish

your most pleasing sight;

let never winter bite

nor season perish.

Loues Victory: The title perhaps signals that this will be a tragicomedy. Philisses: The characters in the play have loose associations with members of Wroth's family, crossing over genertions. So Philisses evokes Wroth's first cousin and lover William Herbert but also Philip Sidney; Musella Wroth herself but also Penelope Rich; Rustic possible Robert Wroth (Mary Wroth's husband) but also Robert Rich; Lissius perhaps Philip Herbert but also Mathew Lister and Simeana perhaps Susan de Vere and Mary Herbert, Countess of Pembroke. Huntington begins with Philisses' lyrical soliloquy (possibly an actual song, though no musical settings for the play survive) about his unrequited (so he thinks) love for Musella. The Collation throughout includes all differences between the two manuscripts including spelling and punctuation. Penshurst tends to replace no punctuation with punctuation and uses far more question marks and exclamation marks. It is evident that Wroth made numerous revisions at every level.

Loues Victorie ƒ [ Loues Victory:]*

Phili∫ses*

You plea∫ant floury meade

wch I did once well loue

your [ yor] pathes noe more I'le tread

your [ yor] plea∫ures noe more proue

your [ yor] beauty more admire

your [ yor] coulers more adore

nor gras [ gra∫s] wt [ wth] daintiest store

of ∫weets to breed de∫ire, [ de∫ire]

Walks[ Waulks] once ∫oe ∫ought for now

I shunn [ shun] you for the darcke, [ dark]

birds to who∫e ∫ong did bow

my [ mine] eares [ ears] your notes nere mark;

brooke [ Brook] wch ∫oe plea∫ing was

vpon who∫e banks I lay,

and on my pipe did play

now, vnreguarded pa∫s,[ pas]

Meadowes, pathes, gra∫s, flouers [ gra∫se, flowrs]

walkes, birds, brooke, truly finde

all proue butt as Vaine shouers

wish'd wellcome [ wellcome,] els vnkind: [ unkind]

you once I loued best

butt loue makes mee you leaue

by loue I loue de∫eaue [ deceaue]

Joy's lost for liues vnrest

Ioy's lost for liues vnrest indeed I ∫ee

alas poore sheapheard mi∫erable mee

Yett faire Mu∫ella loue, and worthy bee

I blame thee nott, butt mine owne mi∫erie

liue you still hapy, and inioy your [ yor] loue,

and lett loues paine [ loue paines] in mee destre∫sed moue

for ∫ince itt is my freind thou doest affect

then wrong him once my ∫elf I will neglect ,[ neglect]

and thus in ∫ecrett will my pa∫sion [ pa∫sions] hide

till time,[ time] or fortune doth my feare de∫ide

making my loue apeere as the bright morne,

wthout, or mist, or cloud, but truly borne,

Li∫sius

Ioyfull [ Joyfull] plea∫ant spring

wch comforts to vs bring

flourish [ flowrish]in yor pride

neuer lett decay

your delights alay

∫ince ioye is to you ti'de, [ tide]

Phi:

Noe ioye is tide to you, you t'is doe proue

the plea∫ure of your [ yor]freinds vnhapy loue

t'is you enioy [ inioy] the comfort of my paine,[ paine]

t'is I that loue, and you that loue obtaine,

Li∫sius, [ Liss:]

Lett noe frost nor wind

your dainty [ daintiest] coulers blind

butt rather cherish

your most plea∫ing [ pleasant] ∫ight

lett neuer winter bite

nor ∫ea∫on perish

Phi:

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Phi:

I cannott perish more then now I doe

vnle∫s my death my mi∫eries vndoe

Li∫sius is hapy, butt phili∫ses curst

loue ∫eekes to him, on mee hee doth his wurst,

and doe thy wurst on mee still froward boy

more ill thou can'st nott, butt poore lyfe destroy

wch doe, and glory in thy conquest gott

all men must dy, and loue drew my ill lott

Li∫sius,

My deare Phili∫ses what alone, and ∫ad,

Phi:

nether, butt mu∫ing Why the best is bad

butt you were merry I'le nott marr yor ∫ong

my thoughts ar tedious, and for you to long ex:

Li:

Alas what meanes this, ∫urely itt is loue

that makes in him this alteration moue,

this is the humor makes our sheapheards raue

I'le non of this, I'le ∫ouner ∫eeke my graue

loue, by your fauour, I will non of you

I rather you should mi∫s, then I should ∫ue

yett Cupid, poore Phili∫ses back restore

to his first witts, and I'le affect thee more; ex:

Siluesta:

Faire shining day, and thou Apollo bright

wch to the∫e plea∫ant Vallys giues thy light,

and wt ∫weet shoures mixt wth golden beames

inrich the∫e meadowes, and the∫e gliding streames

Wherin thou ∫eest thy face like mirrour faire

dre∫sing in them thy curling, shining haire;

this place wth ∫weetest flouers still doth deck

who∫e coulers show theyr pride, free from the check

of fortunes frowne ∫oe long as spring doth last

butt then feele chang, wherof all others tast

as I for one, who thus my habitts chang

Once sheapherde∫s, butt now in woods must rang,

and after the chaste Gode∫s beare her bowe,

though ∫eruice once to Venus I did owe,

who∫e ∫eruante then I was, and of her band

butt farewell folly, I wth Dian stand

against loues changings, and blind foulery

to hold wth hapy, and ble∫'sd chastity

for loue is idle hapines ther's none

when freedomes lost, and chastity is gone,

and where, on earth most ble∫sednes their is

loues fond de∫ires neuer faile to mi∫s,

and this beeleeue mee you will truly find

lett nott repentance therfor chang yor mind

butt chang befor, yor glory wilbee most

When as the waggish boy can least him bost;

for hee doth ∫eeke to kindle flames of fire

butt neuer thinks to quench; a chaste de∫ire

hee calls his foe; hee hates non more then tho∫e

who ∫triues his lawe to shun, and this haue chose

Philisses:

I cannot perish more than now I do,

unless my death my miseries undo.

Lissius is happy, but Philisses cursed,

love seeks to him, on me he doth his worst --

and do thy worst on me still froward boy,

more ill thou canst not, but poor life destroy,

which do, and glory in thy conquest got,

all men must die, and love drew my ill lot.

Lissius:

My dear Philisses, what alone, and sad?

Philisses:

Neither, but musing why the best is bad;

but you were merry, I'll not mar your song

my thoughts are tedious, and for you too long.

[exit Philisses]

Lissius:

Alas, what means this? Surely it is love

that makes in him this alteration move.

This is the humour makes our shepherds rave;

I'll none of this, I'll sooner seek my grave.

Love, by your favour, I will none of you.

I rather you should miss, than I should sue --

yet Cupid, poor Philisses back restore

to his first wits, and I'll affect thee more.

[Exit Lissius]

Silvesta:

Fair shining day, and thou Apollo bright

which to these pleasant valleys gives thy light,

and with sweet showers mixed with golden beams

enrich these meadows, and these gliding streams

wherein thou seest thy face like mirror fair

dressing in them thy curling, shining hair;

this place with sweetest flowers still doth deck

whose colours show their pride, free from the check

of fortunes frown so long as spring doth last,

but then feel change, whereof all others taste

as I for one, who thus my habits change.

Once shepherdess, but now in woods must range,

and after the chaste Goddess bear her bow,

though service once to Venus I did owe,

whose servant then I was, and of her band;

but farewell folly, I with Dian stand

against love's changings and blind foolery,

to hold with happy and blest chastity,

for love is idle happiness; there's none

when freedom's lost, and chastity is gone,

and where on earth most blessedness there is,

love's fond desires never fail to miss,

and this believe me you will truly find.

Let not repentance therefore change your mind,

but change before, your glory will be most

when as the waggish boy can least him boast;

for he doth seek to kindle flames of fire,

but never thinks to quench; a chaste desire

he calls his foe; he hates none more than those

who strives his law to shun, and this have chose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ex: Wroth marks numerous exits in both manuscripts, clearly envisaging the technical requirements for a performance.

Phi:

I cannott perish more then now I doe

vnle∫s my death my mi∫eries vndoe

Li∫sius is hapy, [ happy] butt phili∫ses[ Phili∫ses] curst

loue ∫eekes to him, on mee hee doth his wurst,

and doe thy wurst on mee still froward boy

more ill thou can'st [ canst] nott, butt poore lyfe destroy

wch doe, and glory in thy conquest gott

all men must dy, and loue drew [ drewe] my ill lott

Li∫sius, [ Liss:]

My deare [ deere] Phili∫ses what alone, and ∫ad,

Phi:

nether [ Neither], butt mu∫ing why the best is bad

butt you were merry I'le nott marr yor [ your] ∫ong

my thoughts ar tedious, and for you to [ too]long [ longe;]ex:*

Li: [ Liss:]

Alas what meanes this,[ ?] ∫urely itt is loue

that makes [ doth] in him this alteration moue,

this is the humor makes our sheapheards [ sheapherds] raue

I'le non of this, I'le ∫ouner [ rather] ∫eeke my graue

loue,[ Loue] by your fauour,[ fauor] I will non of you

I rather you should mi∫s, [ mi∫s] then I should [ showld] ∫ue

yett Cupid, [ Cupid] poore Phili∫ses back restore

to his first witts, and I'le affect thee more; ex: [ more]

Siluesta:

Faire shining day, and thou Apollo bright

wch to the∫e plea∫ant Vallys [ vallies] giues thy [ pleasant] light,

and wt ∫weet shoures [ showrs] mixt wth golden beames

inrich the∫e [ thes] meadowes, and the∫e gliding streames[ streams]

Wherin thou ∫eest thy face like mirrour [ mirror] faire

dre∫sing in them thy curling,[ curling] shining haire;[ haire]

this place wth ∫weetest flouers [ flowres] still doth deck

who∫e coulers [ colors] show [ shew] theyr pride, free from the check

of fortunes frowne ∫oe long as spring doth last

butt then feele change, [ change]wherof all others tast

as I for one, who thus my habitts change

Once sheapherde∫s, [ sheapherde∫s] butt now in woods must range,

and after the chaste Gode∫s beare her bowe, [ bowe]

though ∫eruice once to Venus I did owe, [ owe]

who∫e ∫eruante then I was, and of her band

butt farewell folly, [ folly] I wth Dian stand

against loues changings, [ changinge] and blind foulery [ foulerie]

to hold wth hapy, and ble∫'sd [ blest] chastity

for loue is idle hapines ther's none

when freedomes [ freedom's] lost, and chastity is gone, [ gon]

and where, on earth most ble∫sednes their [ ther] is

loues fond de∫ires neuer faile to mi∫s,

and this beeleeue mee you will truly find

lett nott repentance therfor change yor [ your] mind

butt chang [ change] befor, [ beefor] yor [ your] glory wilbee most

When as the waggish boy [ boye] can least him bost;[ boast]

for hee doth ∫eeke to kindle flames of fire

butt neuer thinks to quench; [ heale] a chaste de∫ire

hee calls his foe; hee hates non more then tho∫e

who ∫triues [ striue] his lawe to shun, and this haue [ life] chose

Page of Huntington manuscript.

All Vertu hates, his kingdomes wantones

his crowne de∫ires, his ∫epter idlenes

his wounds hott fires, his helps like frost

glad to hurt, butt neuer heales; think's time lost

if any gaine theyr long ∫ought ioye wt bli∫s,

and this the gouernment of folly is:

Butt heere Phili∫ses comes, poore sheapheard lad

wt loues hott fires, and his owne made mad,

I must away, my Vowe allowes noe ∫ight

of men, yett must I pitty him poore wight

though hee reiecting mee this change haue wrought

hee shalbee noe le∫s worthy in my thought;

yett wish I doe hee were as free as I

then were hee hapy now feels mi∫ery;

for thanks to heauen, and to the Gods aboue

I haue wunn chastity in place of loue;

now loue's as farr from mee as neuer knowne,

then bacely tied, now freely ame mine owne;

slauery, and bondage wth mourning care

was then my liuing, ∫ighs, and teares my fare,

butt all the∫e gon now liue I ioyfully

free, and vntouch'd of thought but chastitye, ex:

Phi:

Loue beeing mist in heauen att last was found

lodg'd in Mu∫ella's faire though cruell brest

cruell alas, yett wheron I must ground

all hopes of ioye, though tired wth vnrest;

O deerest deere, lett plaints which true felt are

gaine pitty once doe nott delight to proue

∫oe mercyles, still killing wth despaire

nor plea∫ure take ∫oe much to try my loue;

Yett if your triall, will you milder make,

try, butt nott long, least pitty come to late;

butt Ô. she can nott, may nott, will nott take

pitty on mee, she loues, and lends mee hate,

Li:

Fy my Phili∫ses will you euer fly

my ∫ight that loues you, and your good de∫ires

Phi:

Fly you deare Li∫sius no, butt still a cry

I heere that ∫ayes I burne in ∫corners fires

farwell good Li∫sius, I will ∫oune returne

butt nott to you, a riuall like to burne; ex:

Li∫s

Ah poore phi: would I knew thy paine

that as I now lament might help obtaine

butt yett in loue they ∫ay non should bee v∫'d

butt ∫elf de∫arts least trust might bee abu∫'d;

A Forester:

Did euer cruelty itt ∫elf thus showe?

did euer heauen our mildnes thus farr moue?

all

All virtue hates his kingdom's wantonness,

his crown desires, his sceptre idleness,

his wounds' hot fires, his helps like frost

glad to hurt, but never heals; thinks time lost

if any gain their long sought joy with bliss,

and this the government of folly is.

But here Philisses comes, poor shepherd lad,

with love's hot fires, and his own, made mad.

I must away, my vow allows no sight

of men, yet must I pity him, poor wight,

though he rejecting me this change have wrought,

he shall be no less worthy in my thought;

yet wish I do he were as free as I,

then were he happy, now feels misery;

for thanks to heaven, and to the gods above

I have won chastity in place of love.

Now love's as far from me as never known,

then basely tied, now freely am mine own;

slavery and bondage with mourning care

was then my living, sighs and tears my fare.

But all these gone, now live I joyfully

free, and untouched of thought but chastity.

[Exit Silvesta]

Philisses:

Love being missed in heaven at last was found

lodged in Musella's fair though cruel breast.

Cruel, alas, yet whereon I must ground

all hopes of joy, though tired with unrest.

O dearest dear, let plaints which true felt are

gain pity once; do not delight to prove

so merciless, still killing with despair,

nor pleasure take so much to try my love.

Yet if your trialwill you milder make,

try, but not long, lest pity come too late.

But O, she cannot, may not, will not take

pity on me; she loves, and lends me hate.

Lissius:

Fie, my Philisses will you ever fly

my sight that love you, and your good desires?

Philisses:

Fly you dear Lissius, no, but still a cry

I hear that says I burn in scorner's fires.

Farewell good Lissius, I will soon return,

but not to you, a rival like to burn.

[Exit Philisses]

Lissius:

Ah poor Philisses: would I knew thy pain

that as I now lament, might help obtain,

but yet in love they say none should be used

but self-deserts, lest trust might be abused.

A Forester:

Did ever cruelty itself thus show?

Did ever heaven our mildness thus far move?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

reiecting mee: Silvesta's rejection by Philisses, which drove her to renounce Venus and embrace Diana, is part of the play's complex network of misplaced, misunderstood and trejected desire. While much is resolved by the end of the play (in Penshurst), a number of characters fail to gain their desire, and Silvesta concludes somewhat ambiguously by offering Forester her 'chaste love'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Forester: Forester, unlike the shepherds, offers what Wynne-Davies in her edn. has referred to as an example of neoPlatonic love. He remains true to Silvesta throughout the play.

All Vertu hates, his kingdomes [ kingdom's ]wantonnes

his crowne [ Crowne] de∫ires, his ∫epter idleness [ Idlenes]

his wounds hott fires [ are], his helps like frost

glad to hurt, butt neuer heales; [ ,] think's [ thinks] time lost

if any gaine theyr long ∫ought ioye wt bli∫s,

and this the gouernment of folly is:

Butt heere Phili∫ses comes, poore sheapheard lad

wt [ wth ] loues hott fires, and his owne made mad,

I must away, my Vowe allowes noe ∫ight

of men, yett must I pitty him poore wight

though hee reiecting mee* this change haue wrought

hee shalbee [ shalbe] noe le∫s worthy in my thought;

yett wish I doe hee were as free as I

then were hee hapy [ happy] now feels mi∫ery;

for [ For] thanks to heauen, and to the Gods [ gods] aboue

I haue wunn [ wun] chastity in place of loue;

now loue's as farr from mee as neuer knowne, [ knowne]

then bacely tied, [ tyde,] now freely ame mine owne;

slauery, and bondage wth [ wt ] mourning care

was [ were] then my liuing, ∫ighs, and teares my fare,

butt all the∫e [ thes] gon now liue I ioyfully

free, and vntouch'd of thought but [ butt] chastitye, ex: [ chastity]

Phi:

Loue beeing mist in heauen [ heau'n] att last was found

lodg'd in Mu∫ella's faire though cruell brest

cruell [ ,] alas, yett wheron I must ground

all hopes of ioye, though tired wth [ wt ] vnrest;

O deerest [ heerest] deere, lett plaints which [ wch] true felt are

gaine pitty once, doe nott delight to proue

∫oe mercyles, [ merciles] still killing wth despaire [ dispaire,]

nor plea∫ure take ∫oe much to try my loue; [ loue]

Yett [ yett] if your triall, will you milder make,

try, butt nott long, least pitty come to late; [ late]

butt Ô. [ o] she can nott, may nott, [ may nott, cannott,] will nott take

pitty on mee, she loues, and lends mee hate,

Li: [ Li∫sius,]

Fy my Phili∫ses will you euer fly

my ∫ight that loues you, and your good de∫ires [ ?]

Phi:

Fly you deare Li∫sius no, butt still a cry

I heere that ∫ayes I burne in ∫corners fires

farwell good Li∫sius, [ ?] I will ∫oune [ soone] returne

butt nott to you, a riuall like to burne; ex: [ burne,]

Li∫s

Ah poore phi: [ Phili∫ses,] would [ wowld] I knew thy paine

that as I now lament might help obtaine

butt yett in loue they ∫ay non should [ showld] bee v∫'d [ u∫de]

butt ∫elf de∫arts [ de∫erts,] least trust might bee abu∫'d;

A Forester:*

Did euer cruelty [ cruelty] itt ∫elf thus [ euer] showe?

did euer heauen our [ owr]mildnes thus farr moue?

all ∫weetnes, and all beauty to orethrow [ orethrowe]

all ioy deface, and crop in spring time loue?

could [ Cowld] any mortall brest inuent ∫uch harme?

could [ cowld] liuing creature think on ∫uch a lo∫s?

noe, noe [ no, no] (alas) itt was the furies charme

who ∫ought by this our [ owr] best delights to cro∫s,

and now in triumph glory in their [ theyr] gaine,

Wher was true beauty found if nott in thee

O deere Siluesta? butt accur∫ed ∫waine

that cau∫'d this change, Ô mi∫erable mee

that liue to ∫ee this day, and days bright light

to shine when plea∫ure's turn'd into dispite; [ dispight]

Li: [ Liss:]

An other of loues band [ ?] ô [ O] mighty loue

that can thy folly make in most to moue;

Fo: [ Forester]

Accur∫ed sheapheard why wert thou ere borne

vnles itt were to bee true Vertues ∫corne

curst bee thy days, vnlucky euer bee

nor euer liue least hapynes [ hapines] to ∫ee,

butt wher thou lou'st lett her as cruell proue

as thou wert to Siluesta, and my loue,

Li:

If [ Iff] one may ask: what is th'offence is dunn? [ dun]

Fo:

that curst Phili∫ses hath mee quite vndun

Page of Huntington manuscript.

all ∫weetnes, and all beauty to orethrow

all ioy deface, and crop in spring time loue,

could any mortall brest inuent ∫uch harme?

could liuing creature think on ∫uch a lo∫s?

noe, noe (alas) itt was the furies charme

who ∫ought by this our best delights to cro∫s,

and now in triumph glory in their gaine,

Wher was true beauty found if nott in thee

O deere Siluesta? butt accur∫ed ∫waine

that cau∫'d this chang, Ô mi∫erable mee

that liue to ∫ee this day, and days bright light

to shine when plea∫ure's turn'd into dispite;

Li:

An other of loues band ô mighty loue

that can thy folly make in most to moue;

Fo:

Accur∫ed sheapheard why wert thou ere borne

vnles itt were to bee true Vertues ∫corne

curst bee thy days, vnlucky euer bee

nor euer liue least hapynes to ∫ee,

butt wher thou lou'st lett her as cruell proue

as thou wert to Siluesta, and my loue,

Li:

If one may ask: what is th'offence is dunn?

Fo:

that curst Phili∫ses hath mee quite vndun

Li:

Vndun as how; Fo: ∫itt downe, and you shall know,

for glad I am yt I my griefe may tell

∫ince t'is ∫ome ea∫e my ∫orrowes cau∫e to show

disburdning my poore hart wch griefe doth ∫well;

then know I lou'd (alas) and euer must

Siluesta faire, ∫ole mrs: of my ioy

who∫e deere affections were in ∫urest trust

laid vp in flames, my hopes cleane to destroy:

for as I truly lou'd, and only shee,

she for phili∫ses ∫igh'd who did reiect

her loue, and paines, nor would (she cruell) ∫ee

my plaints, nor teares butt followed his neglect

wth greater pa∫sion; I, her followed still

she rann from mee, hee flew from her as fast

I after both did by though for my ill

who thus doe liue all wrechednes to tast;

long time this lasted, still she constant lou'd;

and more she lou'd, more cruell still hee grew;

till att the last thus tiran like hee prou'd,

forcing that chang wch maks my poore hart rue;

For she par∫eauing hate ∫oe farr to guide

his ∫ettled hart to nothing butt di∫daine,

hauing all fashions, and all manners tride

that might giue comfort to her endles paine,

butt ∫eeing nothing would his fauor turne

from fondly flying of her truest loue,

led by tho∫e pa∫sions wch did firmly burne

∫o hott as nothing could tho∫e flames remoue

All sweetness and all beauty to o'erthrow,

all joy deface, and crop in Spring-time love.

Could any mortal breast invent such harm?

Could living creature think on such a loss?

No, no (alas), it was the Furies' charm

who sought by this our best delights to cross,

and now in triumph glory in their gain.

Where was true beauty found if not in thee,

O dear Silvesta? But accursed swain

that caused this change. O miserable me

that live to see this day, and day's bright light

to shine when pleasure's turned into despite.

Lissius:

Another of love's band! O mighty love

that can thy folly make in most to move.

Forester:

Accursed shepherd, why wert thou e'er born

unless it were to be true virtue's scorn.

Cursed be thy days, unlucky ever be

nor ever live least happiness to see,

but where thou lov'st let her as cruel prove

as thou wert to Silvesta, and my love.

Lissius:

If one may ask: what is th'offence is done?

Forester:

That cursed Philisses hath me quite undone.

Lissius:

Undone as how?

Forester: Sit down, and you shall know,

for glad I am yet I my grief may tell,

since 'tis some ease my sorrow's cause to show

disburd'ning my poor heart which grief doth swell.

Then know I loved, (alas), and ever must

Silvesta fair, sole mistress of my joy,

whose dear affections were in surest trust,

laid up in flames, my hopes clean to destroy:

for as I truly loved, and only she,

she for Philisses sighed, who did reject

her love, and pains, nor would (she cruel) see

my plaints, nor tears, but followed his neglect

with greater passion. I her followed still;

she ran from me, he flew from her as fast.

I after both did hie, though for my ill,

who thus do live all wretchedness to taste.

Long time this lasted, still she constant loved;

and more she loved, more cruel still he grew;

till at the last thus tyrant-like he proved,

forcing that change which makes my poor heart rue;

For she perceiving hate so far to guide

his settled heart to nothing but disdain,

having all fashions and all manners tried

that might give comfort to her endless pain,

but seeing nothing would his favour turn

from fondly flying of her truest love,

led by those passions which did firmly burn

so hot as nothing could those flames remove,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Li:

Vndun [ Vndone] as how; [ ?] Fo: [ Forr:] ∫itt downe, and you shall know,

for glad I am yt [ that] I my griefe may tell

∫ince t'is ∫ome ea∫e my ∫orrowes [ sorrows] cau∫e to show [ shew]

disburdning my poore hart wch griefe doth ∫well;

then know I lou'd (alas) [ alas,] and euer must

Siluesta faire, ∫ole mrs: [ mrs ] of my ioy [ ioye]

who∫e deere affections were in ∫urest trust

laid [ layd] vp in flames, [ flames] my hopes cleane to destroy: [ destroy,]

for as I truly lou'd, and only shee,

she for phili∫ses [ Phili∫ses] ∫igh'd who did reiect

her loue, and paines, nor would (she cruell) [ wowld she cruell] ∫ee

my plaints, nor teares butt followed his neglect

wth [ wt ] greater pa∫sion; I, [ passion: I] her followed still

she rann [ flew] from mee, hee flew [ ran] from her as fast

I after both did hy though for my ill

who thus doe liue all wrechednes to tast;

long [ Long] time this lasted, still she constant lou'd;

and more she lou'd, more cruell still hee grew; [ grew]

till att the last thus tiran like hee prou'd, [ proud]

forcing that chang wch maks my poore hart rue; [ rew,]

For [ for] she par∫eauing [ parceauing ] hate ∫oe farr to guide

his ∫ettled hart to nothing butt di∫daine

hauing all fashions, [ manners] and all manners [ fashions] tride

that might giue comfort to her endles paine, [ paine:]

butt ∫eeing nothing would his fauor turne

from fondly flying of her truest loue,

led by tho∫e pa∫sions wch did firmly burne

∫o hott as nothing could tho∫e flames remoue

Page of Huntington manuscript.

butt still increa∫e, she, for the last, re∫olu'd

to kill this heat this hopeles cour∫e to take

making a Vow wch can nott bee de∫olu'd,

As nott obtaining loue, will loue for∫ake;

for she hath Vowed vnto Diana's lyfe

her pure Virginitie, as she who could

noe more thene once loue, nor an others wyfe

con∫ent to bee, nor his now if hee would;

this hath hee dun by his vngratfullnes;

would itt might turne to his owne wrechednes

Li:

Ô cur∫e him nott, alas itt is his ill

to feele ∫oe much as doth his ∫ences kill,

and yett indeed this cruelty, and cour∫e

is ∫omwhat hard for sheapheards heere to v∫e,

yett ∫ee I nott how this can proue the wur∫e

for you, who∫e loue she always did refu∫e,

butt much the better ∫ince your ∫uffer'd paine

can bee noe glory to an others gaine;

Fo:

Would itt could bee to anys gaine the most

of glory, honor, fortune, and what more

can added bee, though I had euer lost,

and hee had gain'd the chiefe of beauties store,

for then I might haue her ∫omtimes beheld

butt now am bar'd, for my loue placed was

in truest kind wherin I all excel'd

nott ∫eeking gaine, butt lo∫ing did ∫urpa∫s

tho∫e that obtaine, for my thoughts did a∫send

no higher then to looke, that was my end;

Li:

What strang effects doth phant'∫ie 'mong vs proue

who still brings forth new images of loue,

butt this of all is strangest to affect

only the ∫ight, and nott the ioys respect

nor end of whining loue, ∫ince ∫ight wee gaine

wt ∫male adoe, the other wth much care

doubling the plea∫ure hauing left dispaire

and ∫ure if euer I should chance to loue

the fruictfull ends of loue I first would moue,

Fo:

I wish you may obtaine yor harts de∫ire,

and I butt ∫ight who wast in chastest fire, ex:

Li:

Thes tow to meete in one I ne're did finde

loue, and chastity link'd in ones mans mind

butt now I ∫ee loue hath as many ways

to win, as to destroy when hee delayes;

Phili∫ses, Dalina,

Rustick, Lacon, and Li∫sius,

Da:

The ∫un growes hott 'twer best wee did retire

Li:

but still increase, she, for the last, resolved

to kill this heat, this hopeless course to take,

making a vow which cannot be dissolved,

as not obtaining love, will love forsake;

for she hath vowed unto Diana's life

her pure virginity, as she who could

no more than once love, nor another's wife

consent to be, nor his now if he would;

this hath he done by his ungratefulness.

Would it might turn to his own wretchedness.

Lissius:

O curse him not, alas it is his ill

to feel so much as doth his senses kill,

and yet indeed this cruelty and course

is somewhat hard for shepherds here to use,

yet see I not how this can prove the worse

for you, whose love she always did refuse,

but much the better since your suffered pain

can be no glory to another's gain.

Forester:

Would it could be to any's gain the most

of glory, honour, fortune, and what more

can added be, though I had ever lost,

and he had gained the chief of beauty's store,

for then I might have her sometimes beheld,

but now am barred, for my love placed was

in truest kind wherein I all excelled,

not seeking gain, but losing did surpass

those that obtain, for my thoughts did ascend

no higher than to look, that was my end.

Lissius:

What strange effects doth fancy 'mong us prove

who still brings forth new images of love,

but this of all is strangest: to affect

only the sight, and not the joy's respect,

nor end of winning love, since sight we gain

with small ado, the other with much care

doubling the pleasure having left despair,

and sure if ever I should chance to love

t the fruitful ends of love I first would move.

Forester:

I wish you may obtain your heart's desire,

and I but sight who was in chastest fire.

[Exit Forester]

Lissius:

These two to meet in one I ne'er did find:

love and chastity linked in one man's mind,

but now I see love hath as many ways

to win, as to destroy when he delays.

[Enter Philisses, Dalina, Rustick, Musella and Lacon]

Dalina:

The sun grows hot 'twere best we did retire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ones: this is a typical correction in the Huntington manuscript where Wroth has struck out the incorrect letter; elsewhere she deletes words and inserts corrections above lines.

butt still increa∫e, she, for the last, re∫olu'd

to kill this heat this hopeles cour∫e to take

making a Vow wch can nott bee de∫olu'd, [ di∫solu'd]

As nott obtaining loue, will loue for∫ake;

for she hath Vowed [ Vow'd] vnto Diana's lyfe

her pure Virginitie, [ Virginitie] as she who could

noe [ no] more thene [ then] once loue, nor an others wyfe

con∫ent to bee, nor his now if hee would; [ wowld,]

this hath hee dun by his vngratfullnes; [ vngratefullnes,]

would [ wowld] itt might turne to his owne wrechednes [ ,]

Li: [ Liss:]

Ô [ O]cur∫e him nott, alas itt is his ill

to feele ∫oe much as doth his ∫ences kill,

and yett indeed this cruelty, and cour∫e

is ∫omwhat hard [ strang] for sheapheards heere to v∫e,

yett ∫ee I nott how this can proue the wur∫e

for you, who∫e loue she always did refu∫e,

butt much the better ∫ince your ∫uffer'd [ suffred] paine

can bee noe glory to an others gaine;

Fo:

Would [ Wowld] itt could [ cowld] bee to anys [ any's] gaine the most

of glory, honor, fortune, and what more

can added bee, though I had euer lost,

and hee had gain'd [ obtaind] the chiefe of beauties store,

for then I might haue her ∫omtimes beheld

butt now am bar'd, for my loue placed was

in truest kind wherin I all excel'd [ excelld]

nott ∫eeking gaine, butt lo∫ing did ∫urpa∫s

tho∫e that obtaine, for my thoughts did a∫send

no higher then to looke, that was my end; [ end./]

Li:

What strange effects doth phant'∫ie [ Phant'sy] 'mong [ 'monge] vs proue

who still brings forth new images of loue, [ ?]

butt this of all is strangest to affect

only the ∫ight, and nott the ioys respect

nor end [ ends] of whining loue, ∫ince ∫ight wee gaine

wt ∫male [ ∫mall] adoe, the other wth much care [ paine]

doubling the plea∫ure hauing left dispaire

[ and fauor wun wch kills all former care,]

and ∫ure if euer I should chance to loue

the fruictfull [ fruitfull] ends of loue I first would moue,

Fo: [ Forr:]

I wish you may obtaine yor [ your] harts de∫ire,

and I butt ∫ight who wast [ waste] in chastest fire, ex:

Li:

Thes tow to meete in one I ne're [ nere] did finde

loue, [ Loue,] and chastity [ Chastitie] link'd in ones* mans [ Mans] mind

butt now I ∫ee loue hath as many ways

to win, as to destroy when hee delayes;

Phili∫ses, Dalina,

Rustick, Lacon, and Li∫sius,

Da:

The ∫un growes hott 'twer best wee did retire

Li: Ther's a good shade, phi: butt heer's a burning fire

La:

neuer did I ∫ee man ∫oe chang'd as hee

Da

truly [ Truly] nor I what can the rea∫on bee

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Li:

Ther's a good shade, phi: butt heer's a burning fire

La:

neuer did I ∫ee man ∫oe chang'd as hee

Da

truly nor I what can the rea∫on bee

Phi:

Loue, loue itt is, wch you in time may know

butt happy they can keepe their loue from show

Da:

Mu∫ella wellcom to our meeting is

of all our fellowes you did only mi∫s

Mu:

∫male lo∫s of mee for often'st when I'me here,

I am as if I were another wher

butt wher is Fillis ∫eldome doe I find

her, or ∫imeana mi∫sing, yett the blind

god Cupid late hath strooke her yeelding brest,

and makes her lonely walk to ∫eek for rest

Phi:

Yett when the paine is greatest t'is ∫ome ea∫e

to lett a freind partake his freinds di∫ea∫e

Mu:

That were no frindly part in this you mi∫s

impart vnto yor freind no harme, butt bli∫s;

Phi:

∫ome freind's will redy bee to ea∫e on's ∫mart

Mu:

∫o to beefreind your ∫elf, you'l make them ∫mart,

Da:

Now wee ar mett what sport shall wee inuent

while the ∫uns fury ∫omwhat more bee spent

La:

Lett each one heer their fortune past relate

ther loues, ther froward chance, or their good fate

Mu:

And ∫oe di∫cource the ∫ecretts of the mind

I like nott this, thus mirth may cro∫ses find,

Phi

Let one begin a tale Da: nor that I like

La:

then what will plea∫e wee ∫ee what doth dislike

Phi:

dislike is quickly knowne, plea∫ure is ∫cant

Mu:

And wher ioy's ∫eeme to flow alas ther's want

Climenas word

O my eyes how do you lead

my poore hart thus forth to rang

from the wounted cour∫e to strang

vnknowne ways, and pathes to tread

Lett itt home returne againe

free vntouch'd of gadding thought

and your forces back bee brought

to the ridding of my paine

Butt mine eyes if you deny

this finale fauor to my hart,

and will force my thoughts to fly

know yett you gouerne butt your part;

Lissius:

There's a good shade.

Philisses: But here's a burning fire.

Lacon:

Never did I see man so changed as he.

Dalina:

Truly nor I, what can the reason be?

Philisses:

Love, love it is, which you in time may know,

but happy they can keep their love from show.

Dalina:

Musella welcome to our meeting is;

of all our fellows you did only miss.

Musella:

Small loss of me for often'st when I'm here,

I am as if I were another where.

But where is Fillis? Seldom do I find

her or Simeana missing, yet the blind

god Cupid late hath struck her yielding breast,

and makes her lonely walk to seek for rest.

Philisses:

Yet when the pain is greatest 'tis some ease

to let a friend partake his friend's disease.

Musella:

That were no friendly part, in this you miss,

impart unto your friend no harm, but bliss.

Philisses:

Some friends will ready be to ease one's smart.

Musella:

So to befriend yourself, you'll make them smart,

Dalina:

Now we are met what sport shall we invent

while the Sun's fury somewhat more be spent?

Lacon:

Let each one here their fortune past relate,

their loves, their froward chance, or their good fate.

Musella:

And so discourse the secrets of the mind;

I like not this, thus mirth may crosses find.

Philisses:

Let one begin a tale.

Dalina:

Nor that I like.

Lacon:

Then what will please; we see what doth dislike.

Philisses:

Dislike is quickly known, pleasure is scant.

Musella:

And where joys seem to flow, alas there's want.

Climena:

O my eyes how do you lead

my poor heart thus forth to range

from the wonted course to strange

unknown ways and paths to tread.

Let it home return again

free, untouched of gadding thought

and your forces back be brought

to the ridding of my pain.

But mine eyes, if you deny

this final favour to my heart,

and will force my thoughts to fly,

know yet you govern but your part.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climeana: Wroth changed the names Climeana and Simeana in Huntington to Climena and Simena in Penshurst. At this point in Huntington while it is slightly unclear she seems to be indicating Climeana's song with the slashed S.

The song contest at this point in the play is the first of a series of competitions between the characters, perhaps in imitation of the ecloguies at the end of each 'act' of Philip Sidney's Old Arcadia. Wroth extends these contests from songs, to riddles, to stories, all connected to the genre of the questioni d'amore which dervived from Italian sources but was, by the time Wroth wrote, popular in pastoral Romance as well as drama, see eg Julie D Campbell, Literary Circles and Gender in Early Modern Europe (2006).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phi:

Loue, loue itt is, wch you in time may know [ knowe]

butt happy they can keepe their [ theyr] loue from show

Da:

Mu∫ella wellcom [ wellcome] to our meeting is

of all our fellowes you did only mi∫s

Mu:

∫male lo∫s of mee [ ,] for often'st [ oftnest] when I'me heere,

I am [ ame] as if I were another [ an other] wher

butt wher is Fillis [ ?] ∫eldome doe I find

her, or ∫imeana [ Simena] mi∫sing, yett the blind

god [ God] Cupid late hath strooke her yeelding brest,

and makes her lonely walk to ∫eek for rest

Phi:

Yett when the paine is greatest t'is ∫ome ea∫e

to lett a freind partake his freinds di∫ea∫e

Mu:

That were no frindly [ freindly] part in this you mi∫s [ :]

impart vnto yor [ your] freind no [ noe] harme, [ harme] butt bli∫s; [ ,]

Phi:

∫ome freind's [ freind] will redy [ reddy] bee to ea∫e on's ∫mart

Mu:

∫o [ ∫oe] to beefreind [ befreind] your ∫elf, you'l make them ∫mart, [ they showld bear part,]

Da:

Now wee ar [ are] mett what sport shall wee inuent

while the ∫uns fury ∫omwhat more bee spent

La:

Lett each one heer their fortune past relate

ther [ theyr] loues, ther [ theyr] froward chance, or their [ theyr] good fate

Mu:

And ∫oe di∫cource the ∫ecretts of the mind

I like nott this, thus mirth [ sport] may cro∫ses find, [ :/]

Phi

Let one begin a tale Da: nor that I like

La:

then what [ What then] will plea∫e [ ?] wee ∫ee what doth dislike

Phi:

dislike is quickly knowne, plea∫ure is ∫cant

Mu:

And wher [ where] ioy's [ ioyes] ∫eeme to flow [ flowe,] alas ther's want [ ,]

Climena s Climena [ Climeana]* [ song has no stanza breaks in Penshurst]

O my [ mine] eyes how [ why] do [ doe] you lead

my poore hart thus forth to rang

from the wounted cour∫e to strang [ strange]

vnknowne ways, and pathes to tread [ :]

Lett itt home returne againe

free vntouch'd of gadding thought

and your forces back bee brought

to the ridding of my paine

Butt mine eyes if you deny

this ∫male [ ∫mall] fauor to my hart,

and will force my thoughts to fly

know yett you gouerne butt your [ yor ] part;

Li: [ Liss:]

Climena [ Climeana] hath begunn a prety sport

lett ech [ each] one ∫ing, and ∫o the game is short

Ru: [ Rustick]

Indeed well ∫ayd, and I will first begin

Da:

And who=∫o=euers [ who∫oeuer's ] out, you'll nott bee in [ ,]

Phi:

∫ing [ Singe] they who haue glad harts, or Voice to ∫ing

I can butt patience to this plea∫ure bring

Mu:

then [ Then] you, and I will ∫itt, and iudges bee

Phi:

Would faire Mu∫ella first would iudg of mee

Mu:

will you then ∫ing, Phi: noe, [ Noe] I would only ∫ay

Mu:

chu∫e [ Choose] ∫ome time els, [ ;] who will beegin this play [ ?]

Ru:

why that will I, and I will ∫ing of thee

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Li:

Climena hath begunn a prety sport

lett ech one ∫ing, and ∫o the game is short

Ru:

Indeed well ∫ayd, and I will first begin

Da:

And who=∫o=euers out, you'll nott bee in

Phi:

∫ing they Who haue glad harts, or Voice to ∫ing

I can butt patience to this plea∫ure bring

Mu:

then you, and I will ∫itt, and iudges bee

Phi:

Would faire Mu∫ella first would iudg of mee

Mu:

will you then ∫ing, Phi: noe, I would only ∫ay

Mu:

chu∫e ∫ome time els, who will beegin this play

Ru:

why that will I, and I will ∫ing of thee

Mu:

∫orry I ame I should your ∫ubiect bee,

When I doe ∫ee

thee, whitest thee

Yea whiter then lambs wull

how doe I ioy

that thee inioy

I shall Wt my hart full

Thy eyes do play

like goats wth hay,

and skip lik kids fly'ing

from the sly Fox

∫oe eye lids box

shutts vp thy ∫ights priing

Thy cheecks as red

as okar spred

On a fatted sheeps back

thy paps are found

as aples round

noe pray∫es shall lack,

Mu:

Well, you haue pray∫es giuen enough, now lett

an other come ∫ome others to commend,

Ru:

I had much more to ∫ay but thus I'me mett,

and staid, now I will hearken, and attend,

La:

By a plea∫ant riuers ∫ide

hart, and hopes on plea∫ures ti'de

might I see wt in a bower

proudly drest wt euery floure

wch the spring can to vs lend

Venus, and her louing freind

I vpon

Lissius:

Climena hath begun a pretty sport;

let each one sing, and so the game is short.

Rustick:

Indeed well said, and I will first begin.

Dalina:

And whosoever's out, you'll not be in.

Philisses:

Sing they who have glad hearts, or voice to sing;

I can but patience to this pleasure bring.

Musella:

Then you and I will sit, and judges be.

Philisses:

Would fair Musella first would judge of me.

Musella:

Will you then sing?

Philisses: No, I would only say.

Musella:

Choose some time else. Who will begin this play?

Rustick:

Why that will I, and I will sing of thee.

Musella:

Sorry I am I should your subject be.

Rustick:

When I do see

thee, whitest thee,

yea whiter than lamb's wool.

How do I joy

that thee enjoy

I shall with my heart full.

Thy eyes do play

like goats with hay,

and skip like kids flying

from the sly Fox,

so eyelids' box

shuts up thy sight's prying.

Thy cheeks as red

as ochre spread

on a fatted sheep's back;

thy paps are found

as apples round,

no praises shall lack.

Musella:

Well, you have praises given enough, now let

another come some other to commend.

Rustick:

I had much more to say, but thus I'm met

and stayed; now I will hearken, and attend.

Lacon:

By a pleasant river's side,

heart and hopes on pleasure's tide

might I see within a bower,

proudly dressed with every flower,

which the spring can to us lend,

Venus, and her loving friend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ru: Rustick's parodic song not only sends up pastoral clichés but at the same time underlines how unsuitable a match he is for Musella. There is some uncertainty as to how much he might represent Wroth's husband Robert, with Wroth's biographer Margaret P Hannay doubtful of any connection, but other critics pointing to the way Love's Vitory seems to play out a fantasy of avoiding an arranged marriage to an unloved suitor, given the apparent shaky start to Wroth's marriage and her later affair with William Herbert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mu:

∫orry I ame I should your ∫ubiect bee,

[ Ru:]*

When I doe ∫ee

thee, whitest thee

Yea whiter then lambs wull

how doe I ioy

that thee inioy

I shall Wt [ wt] my hart full

Thy eyes [ Eyes] do play

like goats [ Goats] wth [ wt ] hay,

and skip lik [ like] kids fly'ing [ flying]

from the sly Fox [ fox]

∫oe eye lids [ eyelids] box

shutts vp thy ∫ights priing

Thy cheecks as red

as okar spred

On a fatted sheeps back

thy paps are [ ar] found

as [ like] aples round

noe pray∫es [ prai∫es] shall lack, [ lack]

Mu:

Well, you haue pray∫es giuen enough, now lett

an other come ∫ome others to commend, [ comend.]

Ru:

I had much more to ∫ay but [ butt] thus I'me mett,

and staid, [ stayd,] now I will hearken, and attend,

La:

By a plea∫ant riuers ∫ide

hart, and hopes on plea∫ures ti'de [ tide]

might I see wt in a bower [ bowre,]

proudly [ prowdly] drest wt euery floure [ flowre]

wch the spring can to vs [ v∫s] lend

Venus, and her louing freind

I vpon

Page of Huntington manuscript.

I vpon her beauty ga∫'de

they mee ∫eeing were ama∫'de

till att last vp stept a child

in his face, nott actions mild

fly away ∫aide hee for ∫ight

shall both breed, and kill delight

Come away, and follow mee

I will lett thee beautys ∫ee

I obay'd him, then hee staid

hard be∫id a heau'nly maide

When hee threw a flaming dart,

and vnkindly strooke my hart,

Mu:

butt what became then of this ∫ubtile boy

La:

When hee had dunn his wurst hee fled away

Mu:

And ∫oe lett vs 't'is time that wee returne

to tend our flocks who all this time doe burne

Phi:

Burne, and must burne this ∫odainly is ∫ayd

butt heat nott quench'd, alas butt hopes decai'd;

Dali:

What haue you dunn, and must I lo∫e my ∫ong

Mu:

nott lo∫e itt thought awhile wee itt prolong

Da:

I ame content, and now lett all retire

Phi:

and ∫oune returne ∫ent by loues quickest fire;

Venus, and Cupid
Venus;

Fy this is nothing, what is this your care

that among ten the haulf of them you spare

I vould haue all to vayle, and all to weepe

will you att ∫uch a time as this goe sleepe

awake your forces, and make Li∫sius find

Cupid can cruell bee as vell as kind

shall hee goe ∫corning thee and all thy traine:

and plea∫ure take hee can thy force di∫daine

strike him, and tell him thou his lord vill proue

and hee a va'∫sell vnto mighty loue

and all the rest that ∫corners bee of thee

makes wt theyr griefe thy povre a feeler bee

Cupid;

T'is true that Li∫sius, and ∫ome others yett

ar free, and liuely, butt they shall bee mett

butt care ∫ufficient, word butt 'tis nott ther time

as yett into my word plea∫ing paine to clime,

I upon her beauty gazed,

they me seeing were amazed,

till at last up stepped a child,

in his face, not actions mild.

'Fly away,' said he 'for sight

shall both breed, and kill delight.

Come away, and follow me;

I will let thee beauties see.'

I obeyed him. Then he stayed

hard beside a heav'nly maid,

when he threw a flaming dart,

and unkindly struck my heart,

Musella:

But what became then of this subtle boy?

Lacon:

When he had done his worst he fled away.

Musella:

And so let us; 'tis time that we return

to tend our flocks who all this time do burn.

Philisses:

Burn, and must burn, this suddenly is said,

but heat not quenched, alas but hopes decayed.

Dalina:

What, have you done, and must I lose my song?

Musella:

Not lose it though awhile we it prolong.

Dalina:

I am content, and now let all retire.

Philisses:

And soon return sent by love's quickest fire.

[Exeunt]

[Enter Venus and Cupid]

Venus:

Fie, this is nothing! What, is this your care

that among ten the half of them you spare?

I would have all to wail, and all to weep.

Will you at such a time as this go sleep?

Awake your forces, and make Lissius find

Cupid can cruel be as well as kind.

Shall he go scorning thee and all thy train

and pleasure take he can thy force disdain?

Strike him, and tell him thou his lord will prove,

and he a vassal unto mighty love,

and all the rest that scorners be of thee.

Make with their grief thy power a feeler be.

Cupid:

'Tis true that Lissius and some others yet

are free, and lively, but they shall be met

but [sic perhaps 'by' intended]care sufficient, but 'tis not their time

as yet into my pleasing pain to climb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in the clowds: this added stage direction in Penshurst points once again to the influence of the Masque on the play.

I vpon her beauty ga∫'de [ gaz'd]

they [ They] mee ∫eeing were ama∫'de

till att last vp stept [ vpstept] a child

in his face, [ face] nott actions mild

fly away ∫aide [ ∫ayd] hee for ∫ight

shall both breed, [ breed] and kill delight

Come [ Fly] away, and follow mee

I will lett thee beautys [ beauties] ∫ee

I obay'd [ obayd] him, then [ when] hee staid

hard be∫id [ be∫ide] a heau'nly [ heaunly] maide

When hee threw a flaming dart,

and vnkindly strooke my hart,

Mu:

butt what became then of this ∫ubtile [ the cruell] boy

La:

When hee had dunn his wurst hee fled away

Mu:

And ∫oe lett vs [ ,] 't'is time that wee [ wee doe] returne

to tend our [ owr] flocks who all this time [ while] doe burne

Phi:

Burne, and must burne [ ,] this ∫odainly is ∫ayd

butt heat nott quench'd, alas [ quenchd alas,] butt hopes decai'd; [ decayd,]

Dali:

What haue you dunn, and must I lo∫e my ∫ong [ ?]

Mu:

nott [ Nott] lo∫e itt though awhile wee itt prolong [ ;]

Da:

I ame content, and now lett all retire [ ,]

Phi:

and [ And] ∫oune [ ∫oone ] returne ∫ent by loues quickest fire; / [ page break]

Venus, and Cupid [ apeering in the clowds]*

Venus;

Fy this is nothing, [ ?] what is this your care [ ?]

that among ten the haulf of them you spare

I would [ wowld] haue all to wayle, and all to weepe

will you att ∫uch a time as this goe sleepe

awake your forces, and make Li∫sius find [ finde]

Cupid can cruell bee as well as kind

shall hee goe ∫corning thee [ ,] and all thy traine:

and plea∫ure take hee can thy force di∫daine

strike him, and tell him thou his lord will [ willt] proue

and hee a va∫sell [ Va∫sell] vnto mighty loue

and all the rest that ∫corners bee of thee

makes [ make] wt theyr griefe thy povre a feeler [ of thy might feelers] bee

Cupid; [ Cu:]

T'is true that Li∫sius, and ∫ome others yett

ar free, and liuely, butt they shall bee mett

butt [ wth] care ∫ufficient, y butt [ for] 'tis nott ther [ theyr] time

as yett into my phr plea∫ing paine to clime,

lett them alon [ alone], and lett them∫elues beeguile [ beguile]

they shall haue torments [ torment] when they thinke [ think] to ∫mile

they are [ ar] nott yett in pride of all theyr ∫corne

butt er'e [ ere] they haue theyr plea∫ures haulfway worne

they shall both cry, [ and ∫igh,] and waile [ wayle] , and weepe [ ,]

and for our [ owr] mercy shall most humbly creepe

loue [ Loue] hath most glory when as greatest sprites

hee downeward throw∫e vnto his owne delights

then take noe care loues victory [ Victory] shall shine

when as [ whenas] your honor shall bee [ shalbee] rai∫d [ ray∫d] by mine

Page of Huntington manuscript.

lett them alon, and lett them∫elues beeguile

they shall haue torments vhen they thinke to ∫mile

they are nott yett in pride of all theyr ∫corne

butt er'e they haue theyr plea∫ures haulfvay worne

they shall both cry, and vaile, and veepe

and for our mercy shall most humbly creepe

loue hath most glory vhen as greatest sprites

hee dovnevard throv∫e vnto his ovne delights

then take noe care loues victory shall shine

when as your honor shall bee rai∫d by mine

Venus

Thanks Cupid if thou doe parform thy othe

and needs you must for gods must vant noe trothe

lett mortalls neuer think itt od or vaine

to word heere that Loue can in all spiritts raine

prin∫es ar nott exempted from ovr mights

word word much les should sheapheards ∫corne vs, and owr rights

though they as vell can loue, and like affect

they must nott therfor our commands reiect

Cu:

word Nor shall, and mark butt vhat my vengeance is

I'le mi∫s my force or they shall vant theyr blis

and arrovs heere I haue of purpo∫e fram'd

vch as they qualities ∫oe are they namd

Loue, iealou∫ie, malice, word feare, and mistrust

yett all thes shall att last incounter iust

harme shall bee non, yett shall they harme indure

for ∫om ∫mall ∫ea∫on then of ioy bee ∫ure

like you this mother, ve: ∫unn I like this vell

and faile nott nov in least part of this spell; ƒ

ƒ

Let them alone, and let themselves beguile;

they shall have torments when they think to smile;

they are not yet in pride of all their scorn,

but e'er they have their pleasures halfway worn

they shall both cry, and wail, and weep,

and for our mercy shall most humbly creep.

Love hath most glory whenas greatest sprites

he downward throws unto his own delights,

then take no care, love's victory shall shine

whenas your honour shall be raised by mine.

Venus:

Thanks Cupid; if thou do perform thy oath --

and needs you must for gods must want no troth --

let mortals never think it odd or vain

to hear that Love can in all spirits reign;

princes are not exempted from our mights

much less should shepherds scorn us, and our rights,

though they as well can love, and like affect,

they must not therefore our commands reject.

Cupid:

Nor shall, and mark but what my vengeance is:

I'll miss my force or they shall want their bliss,

and arrows here I have of purpose framed

which as their qualities, so are they named:

love, jealousy, malice, fear, and mistrust,

yet all these shall at last encounter just,

harm shall be none, yet shall they harm endure

for some small season then of joy be sure.

Like you this mother?

Venus: Son I like this well,

and fail not now in least part of this spell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Venus [ Ve:]

Thanks Cupid if thou doe parform thy[ thine] othe

and [ as] needs you must for gods must want noe trothe

lett mortalls neuer think itt od or vaine

to knowe heere [ hear] that Loue [ loue] can in all spiritts raine

prin∫es [ princes] ar nott exempted from owr mights

and much much les [ les∫] should [ showld] sheapheards [ sheapherds] ∫corne vs, and owr rights

though they as well can loue, and like affect

they must nott therfor our [ owr] commands reiect

Cu:

word Nor shall, and mark butt what my vengeance [ Vengance] is

I'le mi∫s my force [ ,] or they shall want theyr blis [ ,]

and arrows [ arrowes] heere I haue of purpo∫e fram'd

wch as they [ theyr] qualities ∫oe are they namd [ nam'd]

Loue, iealou∫ie, [ iealou∫y,] malice, word feare, and mistrust

yett all thes shall att last incounter iust

harme shall bee [ shalbe] non, yett shall they [ all shall] harme indure

for ∫om ∫mall ∫ea∫on then of ioy bee ∫ure

like you this mother, ve: ∫unn [ ∫on]I like this well [ ,]

and faile nott now in least part of this spell; ƒ

ƒ [ No S fermé, but flourish]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

The ∫ecound Act;

Mu∫ella, Dalina, Simena, Phili∫ses,

Li∫sius, Rustick, Lacon; Siluesta

and a forester

Da:

My thinks wee now to ∫ilent ar, let's play

att ∫omthing while wee yett haue plea∫ing day,

Li

heer's sport enough, Viewe butt her new atire,

and ∫ee her slaue who burns in chast de∫ire

Da:

Mark butt theyr greeting; Li: shee I'me ∫ure will fly,

and hee poore foole will follow still, and cry,

Mu:

What plea∫ure do you take to mock att loue

ar you ∫ure you can nott his pouer proue

butt looke he kneels, and weepes, Li:, and cries ay mee

∫weet Nimph haue pitty or hee dies for thee

Fo:

Alas deere nimph, why fly you still my ∫ight

can my true loue, and firme affection

∫o litle gaine mee as your fairest light

must darckned bee for my affliction

Ô looke on mee, and ∫ee if in my face

true griefe, and ∫orrow show nott my di∫grace;

If yt dispaire doe nott by ∫ighs apeere

if felt di∫daine doe not wth tears make show

my euer wailing, euer ∫addest cheere

and mourning wch noe breath can e're o'reblowe

pitty mee nott; els iudg wt your faire eyes

my louing ∫oule wch to you captiue lies

Sill:

Alas fond forester vrge mee no more

to yt wch now lies nott wt in my might

nor can I grant, or you to ioye restore

by any meanes to yeeld you least delight

for I haue Vow'd wch Vowes I will obay

Vnto Diana what more can I ∫ay

Fo:

Ô this I know yett giue mee butt this leaue

to doe as birds, and trees, and beasts may doe,

doe nott ô doe nott mee of ∫ight beereaue

for wth out you I ∫ee nott, ah! vndoe

nott what is yors: o'rethrowe nott what's your owne

lett mee though conquer'd nott bee quite or'ethrowne;

I know you Vowed haue, and Vowes must stand,

yett though you chaste must bee I may de∫ire

to haue your ∫ight, and this the strictest band

can nott refu∫e, and butt this I require

then grant itt mee, wch I on knees doe ∫eeke,

bee nott to nature, and yor∫elf vnlieke

The Second Act

[Enter Musella, Dalina, Simena, Philisses,Lissius, Rustick, Lacon; Silvesta and a Forester]

Dalina:

Methinks we now too silent are, let's play

at something while we yet have pleasing day.

Lissius:

Here's sport enough; view but her new attire,

and see her slave who burns in chaste desire.

Dalina:

Mark but their greeting.

Lissius: She I'm sure will fly,

and he poor fool will follow still, and cry.

Musella:

What pleasure do you take to mock at love?

Are you sure you cannot his power prove?

But look, he kneels and weeps.

Lissius: And cries. Ay me,

sweet Nymph, have pity or he dies for thee.

Forester:

Alas dear nymph, why fly you still my sight?

Can my true love, and firm affection

so little gain me as your fairest light

must darkened be for my affliction?

O look on me, and see if in my face

true grief and sorrow show not my disgrace.

If yet despair do not by sighs appear,

if felt disdain do not with tears make show

my ever wailing, ever saddest cheer

and mourning which no breath can e'er o'erblow,

pity me not; else judge with your fair eyes

my loving soul, which to you captive lies.

Silvesta:

Alas fond Forester, urge me no more

to that which now lies not within my might,

nor can I grant, or you to joy restore

by any means to yield you least delight;

for I have vowed -- which vows I will obey --

unto Diana. What more can I say?

Forester:

O this I know, yet give me but this leave:

to do as birds, and trees, and beasts may do.

Do not, O do not me of sight bereave,

for without you I see not. Ah! Undo

not what is yours; o'erthrow not what's your own;

let me though conquered not be quite o'erthrown;

I know you vowed have, and vows must stand,

yet though you chaste must be I may desire

to have your sight, and this the strictest band

cannot refuse, and but this I require.

Then grant it me, which I on knees do seek;

be not to nature, and yourself unlike.

The ∫econd Act:

[ no line]

Mu∫ella, Dalina, Simena, [ Simeana] Phili∫ses,

Li∫sius, Rustick, Lacon; Siluesta

and a forester

Da:

My [ Mee] thinks wee now to ∫ilent ar, let's play

att ∫omthing [ ∫omething ] while wee yett haue plea∫ing day,

Li

heer's [ Heer's] sport enough, Viewe butt her new atire,

and ∫ee her slaue who burns in chast de∫ire

Da:

Mark butt theyr greeting; [ meeting] Li: shee [ she] I'me ∫ure will fly,

and hee poore foole will follow still, and cry, [ :]

Mu:

What plea∫ure do you [ you doe] take to mock att loue

ar you ∫ure you can nott his pouer [ powr] proue

butt looke he kneels, and weepes, Li:, and cries [ cryes] ay mee

∫weet Nimph haue pitty or hee dies for thee

Fo:

Alas deere nimph, [ Nimph,] why fly you still my ∫ight

can my true loue, and firme affection

∫o [ ∫oe] gaine mee as your fairest light

must darckned litle [ little] bee for my affliction

Ô [ O] looke on mee, and ∫ee if in my face

true griefe, and ∫orrow show nott my di∫grace;

If yt [ that] dispaire doe nott by ∫ighs apeere

if felt di∫daine [ disdaine] doe not wth tears make show

my euer wailing, [ wayling,] euer ∫addest [ ∫adest] cheere

and mourning [ ;] wch noe breath can e're o'reblowe [ ouerblow]

pitty mee nott; els iudg wt your faire eyes

my louing ∫oule wch to you captiue lies [ . /]

Sill:

Alas fond forester [ Forester] vrge mee no more

to yt [ that] wch now lies nott wt in my might

nor can I grant, or you to ioye restore

by any meanes to yeeld you least delight

for I haue Vow'd wch Vowes I will obay

Vnto Diana [ :] what more can I ∫ay [ ?]

Fo:

Ô this I know yett giue mee butt this leaue

to doe as birds, and trees, and beasts may doe,

doe nott ô [ o] doe nott mee of ∫ight beereaue [ bereaue]

for wth out [ wtout] you I ∫ee nott, ah! [ Ah] vndoe

nott what [ whatt] is yors: [ yours,] o'rethrowe [ orethrow] nott what's your [ yor] owne

lett mee though conquer'd [ conquerd] nott bee quite or'ethrowne;

I know you Vowed haue, and Vowes must stand,

yett though you chaste must bee I may de∫ire

to haue your [ yor] ∫ight, and this the strictest band

can nott [ cannott] refu∫e, and butt this I require

then [ Then] grant itt mee, wch I on knees doe ∫eeke,

bee nott to nature, and yor∫elf vnlieke [ vnleeke;]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Sill:

Noe noe, I ne're beeleeue your fond made othe

I chastity haue ∫worne then noe more moue

I know what t'is to ∫weare, and breake itt both

what to de∫ire, and what itt is to loue;

protest you may that theyr shall nothing bee

by you imagin'd 'gainst my chastitie,

butt this I doubt; your loue will make you cur∫e

(if you ∫oe much doe loue) that cur∫ed day

when I this Vow'd, attempt itt may bee wur∫e,

then follow nott thus hopeles your decay,

butt leaue of louing, or ∫ome other chu∫e

who∫e state, or fortune need nott you refu∫e;

Fo:

Indeed deere nimph 't'is true that chastity

to one who loues may iustly raging moue,

yett louing you, tho∫e thoughts shall banish'd bee

∫ince t'is in you, I, chastitie will loue,

and now depart ∫ince ∫uch is yor plea∫ure

depart (ô mee) from lyfe from ioy, from ea∫e

goe I must, and leaue behind that trea∫ure

wch all contentment gaue, now to displea∫e

my ∫elf wt liberty, I may free goe,

and wth most liberty most grieu'd, most woe; ex:

Mu:

Li∫sius I hope this ∫ight doth ∫omthing moue

in you to pitty ∫oe much constant loue;

Li:

Yes thus itt moues that man should bee soe fond

as to bee ty'de t'a womans faithles bond

for wee should woemen loue butt as our sheepe,

who beeing kind, and gentle giues vs ea∫e,

butt cro∫s, or straying, stuborne, or vnmeeke

shun'd as the woulf wch most our flocks di∫ea∫e,

Mu:

Wee little ar, beeholding vnto you,

word in kindnes le∫s, yett you the∫e words may rue;

I hope to liue to ∫ee you waile, and weepe,

and deeme your griefe farr ∫weeter then your sleepe

then butt remember this, and think on mee

who truly told, you could nott still liue free,

Li:

I doe nott know, itt may bee Very well

butt I beleeue I shall vncharme loues spell,

And cupid if I needs must loue

take yor aime, and shute your wurst

once more rob your mothers doue

all your last shafts ∫ure were burst

tho∫e you stole, and tho∫e you gaue

shute nott mee till new you haue;/

Silvesta:

No, no! I ne'er believe your fond-made oath;

I chastity have sworn; then no more move.

I know what 'tis to swear, and break it both,

what to desire, and what it is to love;

protest you may that there shall nothing be

by you imagined 'gainst my chastity,

but this I doubt; your love will make you curse

(if you so much do love) that cursed day

when I this vowed; attempt it may be worse,

then follow not, thus hopeless your decay,

but leave off loving, or some other choose

whose state or fortune need not you refuse.

Forester:

Indeed dear nymph, 'tis true that chastity

to one who loves may justly raging move,

yet loving you, those thoughts shall banished be

since 'tis in you, I chastity will love,

and now depart since such is your pleasure,

depart (O me) from life, from joy, from ease,

go I must, and leave behind that treasure

which all contentment gave, now to displease

myself with liberty, I may free go,

and with most liberty most grieved, most woe.

[Exit Forester]

Musella:

Lissius I hope this sight doth something move

in you to pity so much constant love.

Lissius:

Yes thus it moves: that man should be so fond

as to be tied t'a woman's faithless bond,

for we should women love but as our sheep,

who being kind and gentle gives us ease,

but cross, or straying, stubborn, or unmeek,

shunned as the wolf which most our flocks disease.

Musella:

We little are beholding unto you,

in kindness less, yet you these words may rue;

I hope to live to see you wail, and weep,

and deem your grief far sweeter than your sleep,

then but remember this, and think on me

who truly told, you could not still live free.

Lissius:

I do not know, it may be very well,

but I believe I shall uncharm love's spell,

And Cupid, if I needs must love,

take your aim, and shoot your worst,

once more rob your mother's dove;

all your last shafts sure were burst,

those you stole, and those you gave;

shoot not me till new you have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sheepe: Lissius' scornful view of women will be suitably punished. However this insouciant bit of misogyny points to a contest in the play between the sexes, with a wide variety of attitudes manifested by different characters.

Sill:

Noe noe, I ne're [ nere] beeleeue your [ yor] fond made othe

I chastity haue ∫worne then noe more moue

I know what t'is to ∫weare, and breake itt both

what to de∫ire, and what itt is to loue; [ loue]

protest you may that theyr [ ther] shall nothing bee

by you imagin'd 'gainst [ gainst] my chastitie,

butt this I doubt; [ doubt] your loue will make you cur∫e

(if you ∫oe much doe loue) that cur∫ed day

when I this Vow'd, attempt itt may bee wur∫e,

then follow nott thus hopeles your decay, [ decaye]

butt leaue of louing, or ∫ome other chu∫e

who∫e state, or fortune need nott you refu∫e; [ refu∫e]

Fo:

Indeed deere [ sweet] nimph 't'is true that chastity [ chastitie]

to one who [ that] loues may iustly raging moue, [ moue]

yett louing you, tho∫e thoughts shall banish'd [ banisht] bee

∫ince t'is [ 't 'is] in you, I, [ I] chastitie will loue,

and now depart ∫ince ∫uch is yor [ your] plea∫ure

depart (ô mee) [ o mee] from lyfe from ioy, [ from ioy, from lyfe,] from ea∫e

goe I must, and leaue behind that trea∫ure

wch all contentment gaue, [ giues,] now to displea∫e

my ∫elf wt liberty, I may free goe,

and wth most liberty most grieu'd, [ griefe,] most woe; ex: [ ./ex:]

Mu:

Li∫sius I hope this ∫ight doth ∫omthing moue

in you to pitty ∫oe much constant loue;

Li:

yes thus itt moues that man should [ showld] bee soe fond

as to bee ty'de [ tide] t'a womans faithles bond [ band]

for wee should [ showld] woemen loue butt as our [ owr] sheepe, [ sheepe]*

who beeing kind, and gentle giues vs ea∫e,

butt cro∫s, or straying, stuborne, or vnmeeke

shun'd as the woulf [ wulf] wch most our [ owr] flocks di∫ea∫e,

Mu:

Wee little ar, [ ar] beeholding vnto you,

and in kindnes le∫s, [ les,] yett you the∫e [ thes] words may rue; [ ,]

I hope to liue to ∫ee you waile, and weepe,

and deeme your griefe farr ∫weeter then your sleepe [ yor ∫leep]

then butt remember this, and think on mee

who truly told, you could nott still liue free,

Li:

I doe nott know, itt may bee Very well

butt I beleeue I shall vncharme loues [ lous] spell,

And cupid if I needs must loue

take yor [ your] aime, and shute your [ yor] wurst

once more rob your [ yor] mothers doue

all your last shafts ∫ure were burst

tho∫e you stole, and tho∫e you gaue

shute nott mee till new you haue;/ [ .]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Phi:

Rustick faith tell mee word hast thou euer lou'd

Ru:

what call you loue, I' haue bin to trouble mou'd

as when my best cloke hath by chance bin torne

I haue liu'd wishing till itt mended were

and butt ∫oe louers do, nor could forbeare

to cry if I my bag, or bottle lost

as louers doe who by theyr loues ar crost

and grieue as much for thes, as they for ∫corne,

Phi:

Call you this loue, why loue is noe ∫uch thing

loue is a paine wch yett doth plea∫ure bring

a pa∫∫ion wch alone in harts doe moue

and they that feele nott this they can nott loue;

't' will make one Ioyfull, merry, plea∫ant, ∫ad

cry, weepe, ∫igh, faste, mourne, nay ∫omtimes starck mad

if they par∫eaue ∫corne, hate, or els desdaine

to wrap their woes in store for others gaine

for yt (butt iealou∫ie) is ∫ure the wurst;

and then bee iealous better bee accurst

but ô ∫ome are, and would itt not di∫clo∫e

though ∫ilent loue, and louing feare, ah tho∫e

de∫erue most pitty, fauor, and reguard,

yett are they an∫wered butt wth ∫corns reward

this theyr mi∫fortune, and the like may fall

to you, or mee who waite mi∫fortunes call

butt if itt doe take heed, bee rul'd by mee,

though you mistrust, mistrust nott that shee ∫ee

for then shee'lle ∫miling ∫ay allas poore foole

this man hath learn'd all parts of follys skoole;

bee wi∫e, make loue, and loue though nott obtaine

for to loue truly is ∫ufficient gaine,

Rustick;

∫ure you doe loue you can ∫oe well declare

the ioys, and plea∫ures, hopes, and his dispare,

I loue indeed; Ru: Phi: butt who is she you loue

Phi:

she who, best thoughts, must to affection moue

if any loue, non neede ask who itt is

wthin thes plaines, non loues that loues nott this

delight of sheaphards, pride of word this faire place

noe beauty is that word shines not in her face

who∫e whitnes whitest Lillys doth excell

match'd word wth a ro∫ie morning to compell

all harts to ∫erue her, yett doth she affect

butt only Vertue word nor will quite neglect

tho∫e who doe ∫erue her in a modest fashion

wch ∫ure doth more increa∫e, then decrea∫e pa∫sion;

Philisses:

Rustick, faith, tell me hast thou ever loved?

Rustick:

What call you love? I have been to trouble moved,

as when my best cloak hath by chance been torn

I have lived wishing till it mended were,

and but so lovers do, nor could forbear

to cry if I my bag, or bottle lost,

as lovers do who by their loves are crossed

and grieve as much for these, as they for scorn.

Philisses:

Call you this love? Why love is no such thing;

love is a pain which yet doth pleasure bring,

a passion which alone in hearts do move,

and they that feel not this they cannot love.

'Twill make one joyful, merry, pleasant, sad,

cry, weep, sigh, fast, mourn, nay sometimes stark mad,

if they perceive scorn, hate, or else disdain

to wrap their woes in store for others gain,

for yet (but jealousy) is sure the worst;

and than be jealous, better be accurst;

but some are, and would it not disclose

though silent love, and loving fear; ah those

deserve most pity, favour, and regard,

yet are they answered but with scorn's reward;

this their misfortune, and the like may fall

to you, or me who wait misfortunes call,

but if it do take heed, be ruled by me,

though you mistrust, mistrust not that she see

for then she'll smiling say, 'alas poor fool,

this man hath learned all parts of folly's school.'

Be wise, make love, and love though not obtain,

for to love truly is sufficient gain.

Rustick:

Sure you do love you can so well declare

the joy, and pleasures, hope and his despair,

Philisses:

I love indeed.

Rustick: But who is she you love?

Philisses:

She who, best thoughts, must to affection move,

if any love, none need ask who it is

within these plains, none loves that loves not this

delight of shepherds, pride of this fair place;

no beauty is that shines not in her face

whose whiteness whitest lilies doth excel

matched with a rosy morning to compel

all hearts to serve her, yet doth she affect

but only virtue, nor will quite neglect

those who do serve her in a modest fashion

which sure doth more increase, than decrease passion.

Phi:

Rustick faith tell mee didst hast thou euer lou'd

Ru:

what call you loue, I' haue bin to trouble mou'd

as when my best cloke hath by chance bin torne

I haue liu'd wishing till itt mended were [ ,]

and butt ∫oe louers do, [ :] nor could forbeare

to cry if I my bag, or bottle lost

as louers doe who by theyr loues ar crost [ ,]

and grieue as much for thes, as they for ∫corne,

Phi:

Call you this loue, why loue is noe ∫uch thing

loue is a paine wch yett doth plea∫ure bring

a pa∫∫ion [ pa∫sion] wch alone in harts doe moue

and they that feele nott this they can nott [ cannott] loue;

't' will [ T'will] make one Ioyfull, [ ioyfull,] merry, plea∫ant, ∫ad

cry, weepe, ∫igh, faste, [ fast,] mourne, nay ∫omtimes starck mad

if they par∫eaue ∫corne, hate, or els desdaine

to wrap their [ theyr] woes in store for others gaine

for yt [ that] (butt iealou∫ie) [ Jealousie)]is ∫ure the wurst;

and then bee iealous [ iealou∫e] better bee accurst

but ô [ O]∫ome are, [ bee,] and would itt not di∫clo∫e

though [ they] ∫ilent loue, and louing feare, ah tho∫e

de∫erue most pitty, fauor, and reguard,

yett are they an∫wered [ an∫werd] butt wth ∫corns reward

this theyr mi∫fortune, and the like may fall

to you, or mee who waite mi∫fortunes [ misfortunes]call

butt if itt doe take heed, bee rul'd [ ruld] by mee,

though you mistrust, mistrust nott that [ yt] shee ∫ee

for then shee'lle [ shee'll] ∫miling ∫ay allas [ alas] poore foole

this man hath learn'd [ learnd] all parts of follys skoole; [ ∫coole,]

bee wi∫e, [ wy∫e,] make loue, and loue though nott obtaine

for to loue truly is ∫ufficient gaine, [ ./]

Rustick; [ Ru:]

∫ure you doe loue you can ∫oe well declare

the ioys, [ ioyes,] and plea∫ures, hopes, [ hope] and theyr his dispare, [ dispaire.] [ space and Phi:]

I loue indeed; Ru: Phi: butt who is she you loue

Phi:

she whose who, best thoughts, must to affection moue

if any loue, non neede ask who itt is

wthin thes plaines, non loues that loues nott this

delight of sheaphards, [ sheapheards] pride of all this [ this] faire place

noe beauty is that shows shines [ shines] not in her face

who∫e whitnes whitest Lillys doth [ di∫grace] excell

match'd [ matchd] with? wth a ro∫ie morning to compell

all harts to ∫erue her, yett doth she affect

butt only Vertue yet nor will quite neglect

tho∫e who doe ∫erue her in a modest [ an honest] fashion

wch ∫ure doth more increa∫e, then decrea∫e pa∫sion;

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Arcas

Heere are they mett wher beauty only raines

who∫e pre∫ence brings the excellentest light,

and brightnes word dimming Pheabus who butt faines;

to outshine thes itt is nott in his might

Faire troope heere is a sport will well beefitt

this time, and place if you will li∫ence itt

Phi:

What is't good Arcas; Ar: why stay, and you shall ∫ee

heer is a booke wherin each one shall draw

a fortune, and therby their luck shall bee

coniectur'd, like you this, you ne're itt ∫awe

Rustick:

itt is noe matter t'is a prety one

Mu∫ella you shall drawe Mu: though chu∫e alone

Phi:

I neuer ∫awe itt butt I like itt well

Li∫s:

then hee chiefs best of all must beare the bell

Ru:

pray thee good Arcas lett mee hold the book

Arcas

wt all my hart, yett you'll nott ∫ome lotts brooke

Rus:

Fairest, ∫weetest, bonny las

you that loue in mirth to pas

time delightfull word come to mee,

and you shall your fortune ∫ee,

Mu:

you tell by booke then ∫ure you can nott mi∫s

butt shall I know what shalbee, or what is

Ru:

what shalbee, nay neuer feare,

Rustick doth thy fortune beare,

draw, and when you cho∫en haue

prais mee who ∫uch fortune gaue

Mu:

And ∫oe I will if good, or if vntrue

I'le blame my owne ill choi∫e, and nott blame you

Phi:

pray, may I ∫ee the fortune you did chu∫e

Mu:

yes, and if right I will itt nott refu∫e

Phi:

non can bee cro∫s to you except you will

Mu:

read itt, Phi: I will although itt were my ill

Fortune can nott cross yor will

though your patience much must bee

feare nott that your luck is ill

you shall your best wishes ∫ee

Refu∫e, beeleeue mee noe you haue no cau∫e

thus hope brings lingring, patience pa∫sions drawes

Da

I'le try what mine shalbee good Rustick hold

Enter Arcas

Arcas:

Here are they met where beauty only reigns,

whose presence brings the excellentest light,

and brightness dimming Phoebus, who but feigns

to outshine these: it is not in his might.

Fair troop, here is a sport will well befit

this time and place, if you will licence it.

Philisses:

What is't good Arcas?

Arcas:

Why stay, and you shall see.

Here is a book wherein each one shall draw

a fortune, and thereby their luck shall be

conjectured. Like you this? You ne'er it saw.

Rustick:

It is no matter 'tis a pretty one.

Musella you shall draw.

Musella: Though choose alone.

Philisses:

I never saw it but I like it well.

Lissius:

Then he 'chieves best of all must bear the bell.

Rustick:

Pray thee good Arcas, let me hold the book.

Arcas:

With all my heart, yet you'll not some lots brook.

Rustick:

Fairest, sweetest, bonny lass,

you that love in mirth to pass

time delightful come to me,

and you shall your fortune see.

Musella:

You tell by book, then sure you cannot miss;

but shall I know what shall be, or what is.

Rustick:

What shall be, nay never fear,

Rustick doth thy fortune bear,

draw, and when you chosen have,

praise me who such fortune gave.

Musella:

And so I will if good, or if untrue,

I'll blame my own ill choice, and not blame you.

Philisses:

Pray, may I see the fortune you did choose?

Musella:

Yes, and if right I will it not refuse.

Philisses:

None can be cross to you except you will.

Musella:

Read it.

Philisses: I will although it were my ill.

Fortune cannot cross your will

though your patience much must be;

fear not that your luck is ill

you shall your best wishes see.

Refuse, believe me -- no, you have no cause

thus hope brings ling'ring, patience passion draws.

Dalina:

I'll try what mine shall be, good Rustick hold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fortune: the drawing of lots was again a popular pastime, at least as depicted in plays and masques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bold: Dalina is the most combative of all the women, here being 'too bold' in stepping in before a man's turn, and later speaking against the way that infatuation is a tytrap for women. It is hard to know exactly how we are meant to interpret her ready acceptance of Rustic's (rebound) offer of marriage at the end of the play.

Arcas [ ,]

Heere are they mett wher beauty only raines [ raignes,]

who∫e pre∫ence brings [ giues] the excellentest light,

and brightnes moueth dimming Pheabus who butt faines; [ faines]

to outshine thes itt is nott in his might

Faire troope heere is a sport will well beefitt

this time, and place if you will li∫ence [ licence] itt

Phi:

What is't good Arcas; Ar: why stay, and you shall ∫ee

heer is a booke wherin each one shall draw

a fortune,* and therby their [ theyr] luck shall bee [ shalbee]

coniectur'd, like you this, [ this?] you ne're itt ∫awe [ ∫aw.]

Rustick: [ Ru:]

itt [ Itt] is noe matter t'is [ 't'is] a prety [ pretty] one

Mu∫ella you shall drawe [ :] Mu: though chu∫e alone

Phi:

I neuer ∫awe itt [ ,] butt I like itt well

Li∫s:

then [ Then] hee chiefs [ chieues] best of all must beare the bell

Ru:

pray thee good Arcas lett mee hold the book [ booke]

Arcas [ Ar:]

wt [ Wth] all my hart, yett you'll nott ∫ome lotts brooke

Rus: [ Ru:]

Fairest, ∫weetest, bonny las

you that loue in mirth to pas

time delightfull word come to mee,

and you shall your fortune ∫ee, [ ;]

Mu:

you tell by booke then ∫ure you can nott mi∫s

butt shall I know what shalbee, [ shalbe] or what is

Ru:

what shalbee, nay neuer [ you need nott] feare,

Rustick doth thy fortune beare,

draw, and when you cho∫en haue

prais [ prays] mee who ∫uch fortune gaue

Mu:

And ∫oe I will if good, or if [ iff] vntrue

I'le blame my [ mine] owne ill choi∫e, and nott blame you

Phi:

pray, [ Pray,] may I ∫ee the fortune you did chu∫e

Mu:

yes, and if right I will itt nott refu∫e

Phi:

non [ Non] can bee cro∫s to you [ ,] except you will

Mu:

read itt, Phi: I will although itt were my ill

Fortune can nott cro∫s yor will

though your patience much must bee

feare nott that your luck is ill

you shall your best wishes ∫ee

Refu∫e, beeleeue mee noe you haue no cau∫e

thus hope brings lingring, [ longing,] patience pa∫sion drawes

Da

I'le try what mine shalbee good Rustick hold

Arcas.

A man must follow, Da: I ame [ 'ame] still to bold*

Phi:

then [ Then] I will try though ∫ure of cruelty [ crueltie]

and yett this promi∫es [ lott doth promi∫e] ∫ome ioy [ good] att last

that though I now feele greatest mi∫ery [ mi∫erie]

my ble∫sed days to come ar nott all past [ ,]

Da:

come this fond louer knowes nott yett the play

hee studdies [ studies] while our fortunes runn away

what haue you gott, [ !] lett's ∫ee, do you this loue [ ?]

Phi [ :]

Read itt, butt heaun grant mee the end to proue

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Arcas,

A man must follow, Da: I ame still to bold

Phi:

then I will try though ∫ure of cruelty

and yett this promi∫es ∫ome ioy att last

that though I now feele greatest mi∫ery

my ble∫sed days to come ar nott all past

Da:

come this fond louer knowes nott yett the play

hee studdies while our fortunes runn away

what haue you gott, lett's ∫ee, do you this loue

Phi

Read itt, butt heaun grant mee the end to proue

Da:

You doe liue to be much crost

yett esteeme no labour lost

∫ince you shall wth ioy obtaine

plea∫ure for yor ∫uffer'd paine,

truly I can nott blame you, like you this

∫o I att last might gaine I well could mis

Mu:

After a raine the ∫weetest floures doe grow

∫oe shall yor hap bee as this book doth show

Da:

now I may draw, ∫weet fortune bee my guide

Mu:

she can nott ∫ee, yett must yor chance abide

Da:

blind, or nott I care nott this I take, and

if good my luck, if bad a luckles hand

Phi:

If Fortune guide she will direct to loue

they can nott parted bee; what now, do'st moue,

Da:

moue? did you euer see the like; phi: nott I

Da:

nay read itt out itt showes my constancie

Phi:

They that can nott stedy bee

to them ∫elues; the like must ∫ee

ficle poeple, ficly chu∫e

∫lightly like, and ∫oe refu∫e

this your fortune who can ∫ay

heerin iustice bears nott ∫way

In troth Dalina fortune is prou'd curst

to you wt out de∫ert, Da: this is the wurst

that she can doe t'is true, I' haue fickle bin

and ∫oe is shee, t'is then the le∫ser ∫in,

lett her proue constant, I Will her ob∫erue,

and then as shee doth mend, I'le good de∫erue;/

Arcas:

A man must follow!

Dalina: I am still too bold.

Philisses:

Then I will try though sure of cruelty.

And yet this promises some joy at last,

that though I now feel greatest misery

my blessed days to come are not all past.

Dalina:

Come, this fond lover knows not yet the play;

he studies while our fortunes run away.

What have you got, let's see, do you this love?

Philisses:

Read it, but heav'n grant me the end to prove.

Dalina:

You do live to be much crossed,

yet esteem no labour lost,

since you shall with joy obtain

pleasure for your suffered pain.

Truly I cannot blame you. Like you this?

So I at last might gain, I well could miss

Musella:

After a rain the sweetest flowers do grow,

So shall your hap be as this book doth show.

Dalina:

Now I may draw, sweet fortune be my guide.

Musella:

She cannot see, yet must your chance abide.

Dalina:

Blind or not I care not, this I take, and

if good my luck, if bad a luckless hand.

Philisses:

If Fortune guide she will direct to love,

they cannot parted be; what now, dost move?

Dalina:

Move? Did you ever see the like?

Philisses: Not I.

Dalina:

Nay read it out; it shows my constancy.

Philisses:

They that cannot steady be

to themselves the like must see;

fickle people, fickly choose,

slightly like, and so refuse;

this your fortune who can say?

Herein justice bears not sway.

In troth Dalina, fortune is proved curst

to you without desert.

Dalina: This is the worst

that she can do; 'tis true, I have fickle been

and so she, 'tis then the lesser sin.

Let her prove constant, I will her observe,

and then, as she doth mend, I'll good deserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Da:

you doe liue to be much crost

yett esteeme no labour lost

∫ince you shall wth ioy [ blis] obtaine

plea∫ure for yor [ your] ∫uffer'd [ ∫uffred] paine,

truly I can nott blame you, like you this

∫o [ ∫oe] I att last might gaine I well could [ cowld] mis [ mi∫s.]

Mu:

After a raine the ∫weetest floures [ flowres] doe grow

∫oe shall yor [ your] hap bee as this book doth show

Da:

now I may [ must I] draw, [ drawe] ∫weet fortune bee my guide

Mu:

she can nott [ cannott] ∫ee, yett must yor chance abide

Da:

blind, [ blinde] or nott [ noe] I care nott [ ,] this I take, and

if good [ ,] my luck, if bad [ nott] a luckles hand [ ,]

Phi:

If [ Iff] Fortune guide she will direct to loue

they can nott parted bee; what [ how] now, do'st moue?

Da:

moue? [ Moue?] did you euer see the like; phi: nott I

Da:

nay read itt out itt showes my constancie [ .]

Phi:

They that can nott [ cannott] stedy bee

to them ∫elues; [ them∫elues] the like must ∫ee

ficle [ fickle] poeple, [ people]ficly [ fickly] chu∫e

∫lightly like, and ∫oe refu∫e

this your fortune [ ,] who can ∫ay

heerin iustice bears nott ∫way [ !]

In troth Dalina fortune is prou'd [ proud] curst

to you wt out de∫ert, [ .] Da: this is the wurst

that she can doe t'is true, I' haue fickle [ ficle] bin

and ∫oe is shee, t'is [ 't 'is] then the le∫ser ∫in,

lett her proue constant, I Will [ will] her ob∫erue,

and then [ ,] as shee doth mend, I'le good de∫erue;/ [ ,]

Arcas

who cho∫eth next [ ?] Li: nott I least ∫uch I proue

Si:

nor I, itt is ∫ufficient I could loue [ ,]

Arcas [ Ar:]

I'le wish, [ wish] for one but fortune [ Fortune] shall nott try

on mee her tricks who∫e fauours ar ∫oe dry,

Da:

Non can wish if they their wishes loue nott

nor can they loue if that [ that theyr] wishings moue nott

Phi:

you faine would [ wowld] ∫aulue this bu∫ines, Da: who would I

nay my cares past, I, Loue, and his deny [ .]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Arcas

who cho∫eth next Li: nott I least ∫uch I proue

Si:

nor I, itt is ∫ufficient I could loue

Arcas

I'le wish, for one but fortune shall nott try

on mee her tricks who∫e fauours ar ∫oe dry,

Da:

Non can wish if they their wishes loue nott

nor can they loue if that wishings moue nott

Phi:

you faine would ∫aulue this bu∫ines, Da: who would I

nay my cares past, I Loue, and his deny

Phi:

Loue, and Rea∫on once att warr

Ioue came downe to end the iarr

Cupid ∫aid loue must haue place

Rea∫on that itt was his grace

Ioue then brought itt to this end

rea∫on should on loue attend

loue takes rea∫on for his guid

rea∫on can nott from loue slide

This agreed, they plea∫d did part

rea∫on ruling Cupids dart

∫oe as ∫ure loue can nott mi∫s

∫ince that rea∫on ruler is;

Li:

It ∫eemes hee must beefore hee had this guid

Phi:

I'me ∫ure nott mee, I nere my hart could hid

butt hee itt found, ∫oe as I well may ∫ay

had hee bin blind I might haue stolne away

butt ∫oe hee ∫aw, and rul'd wt rea∫ons might

as hee hath kild in mee all my delight,

hee wounded mee (alas), wt double harme

and non butt hee can my distre∫s vncharme;

an other wound must cure mee or I dy,

but stay this is enough, I hence will fly,

and ∫eeke the boy that strooke mee, fare you well,

yett make nott still yor plea∫ures proue my hell

Li:

Phili∫ses now hath left vs, lett's goe back

and tend our flocks who now our care doe lack

yett would hee had more plea∫ant parted hence

or that I could but iudg the cau∫e from whence

thes pa∫sions grow, itt would giue mee much ea∫e

∫ince I par∫eaue my ∫ight doth him displea∫e

Mu:

Well lett's away, and hether ∫oune returne

that ∫unn to mee who∫e ab∫ence makes mee burne;/

He ∫eeks him yett, and of him truly knov

vhat in him hath bred this vnv∫iall woe

If hee deny mee then I'le ∫weare hee hates

mee ore affects that humour vch debases

in his kinde thought vch showld the master bee

Arcas:

Who chooseth next?

Lissius: Not I, lest such I prove.

Silvesta:

Nor I, it is sufficient I could love.

Arcas:

I'll wish for one, but fortune shall not try

on me her tricks, whose favours are so dry.

Dalina:

None can wish if they their wishes love not,

nor can they love if that wishings move not.

Philisses:

You fain would salve this business.

Dalina: Who would I?

Nay my care's past; I love and his deny.

Philisses:

Love, and Reason once at war,

Jove came down to end the jar.

Cupid said 'Love must have place.'

Reason that it was his grace.

Jove then brought it to this end:

Reason should on love attend,

Love takes Reason for his guide,

Reason cannot from Love slide.

This agreed, they pleased did part,

Reason ruling Cupid's dart.

So as sure Love cannot miss

since that Reason ruler is.

Lissius:

It seems he missed before he had this guide.

Philisses:

I'm sure not me, I ne'er my heart could hide

but he it found, so as I well may say

had he been blind I might have stolen away,

but so he saw, and ruled with reason's might

as he hath killed in me all my delight;

he wounded me (alas) with double harm,

and none but he can my distress uncharm;

another wound must cure me or I die;

but stay, this is enough, I hence will fly,

and seek the boy that struck me. Fare you well,

yet make not still your pleasures prove my hell.

(Exit Philisses)

Lissius:

Philisses now hath left us; let's go back and tend our flocks who now our care do lack.

Yet would he had more pleasant parted hence,

or that I could but judge the cause from whence

these passions grow; it would give me much ease

since I perceive my sight doth him displease.

(Exit Lissius)

Musella:

Well let's away, and hither soon return

that sun to me whose absence makes me burn.

He seeks him yet, and of him truly know

what in him hath bred this unusual woe.

If he deny me then I'll swear he hates

me or affects that humour which debases

in his kind thought which should the master be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ioue: part of the light-hearted use of mythology in the play, which again underlines its association with masques as well as tragicomedies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phi:

Loue, and Rea∫on [ rea∫on] once att warr

Ioue* came downe to end the iarr

Cupid ∫aid [ ∫ayd] loue must haue place

Rea∫on that itt was his grace

Ioue then brought itt to this end

rea∫on should on loue attend

loue [ Loue] takes rea∫on for his guid [ guide]

rea∫on [ Rea∫on] can nott [ cannott] from loue slide

This [ this] agreed, they plea∫d did part

rea∫on ruling Cupids dart

∫oe as ∫ure loue can nott mi∫s

∫ince that rea∫on ruler is; [ . /]

Li:

It [ Itt] ∫eemes hee must beefore hee had this guid

Phi:

I'me ∫ure nott mee, I nere my hart could hid [ hide]

butt hee itt found, ∫oe as I well may ∫ay

had hee bin blind I might haue stolne away

butt ∫oe hee ∫aw, and rul'd wt rea∫ons might

as hee hath kild in mee all my delight,

hee wounded mee (alas), wt double harme

and non butt hee can my distre∫s vncharme;

an other wound must cure mee or I dy,

but [ butt] stay this is enough, I hence will fly,

and ∫eeke the boy that strooke mee, fare you well,

yett make nott still yor [ your] plea∫ures proue my hell

Li:

Phili∫ses now hath left vs, lett's goe back

and tend our flocks who now our care doe lack

yett would hee had more plea∫ant parted hence

or that I could but iudg the cau∫e from whence

thes pa∫sions grow, [ grewe,] itt would giue mee much ea∫e

∫ince I par∫eaue [ parceaue] my ∫ight doth him displea∫e

*inserted text on the side*

He ∫eeks him yett and of him truly know

what in him hath bred this vnu∫uall woe.

If hee deny mee, then I'le ∫weare he hates

mee or affects that humor wch debases [ debates]

In his kinde thought which showld the master bee,

[ butt who the freind is, I will quickly ∫ee; ex:]

Mu:

Well lett's away, and hether ∫oune [ soone] returne

that ∫unn to mee who∫e ab∫ence makes mee burne;/ [ ex:]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Li:

O.̂ plainly deale wt mee my loue hath bin

still firme to you then lett vs nott beegin

to ∫eeme as strangers if I' haue wrongd you speake

and Ile forgiunes ask, els doe nott breake

thos band of freindship of our long held loue

wch word did this plaines to admiration moue

Phi

I can nott change, butt loue thee euer will

for noe cro∫s shall my first affection kill,

butt giue mee leaue that ∫ight once lo'ud to shunn

∫ince by the ∫ight I ∫ee my ∫elf vndunn

Li:

When this opinion first po∫sest thy hart

would death had strooke mee vt his cruell dart;

liue I to bee mistrusted by my freind?

't'is time for mee my vrecked days to end

butt vhat begann this change in thee; Phi: mistrust

Li:

mistrust of mee; Phi: I ame nott ∫oe vniust

Li:

vhat then? pray tell, my hart doth long to kno

Phi:

Why then the change and cau∫e of all my woe

proceeds from this, I feare Mu∫ellas loue

is placed on you, this doth my torment moue,

for if she doe, my freindship bound to you

must make mee leaue my word for loue, or ioy for word to ∫ue,

for though I loue her more then mine owne hart

if you affect her I will ner impart

my loue to her; ∫oe constant freindship binds

my loue vher truth ∫uch faithfull biding finds

{*paste in which should follow Philisses' later speech

Cupid ble∫sed bee thy might

lett thy triumph ∫ee noe night

bee thou iustly god of loue

who thus can thy glory moue

harts obay to Cupids ∫vay

prin∫es non of you ∫ay nay

eyes, lett him direct your vay

for vt out him you may stray

hee your ∫ecrett thoughts can spy

beeing hid els from each eye

lett your ∫ongs bee still of loue

write noe ∫atirs vch may proue

least offen∫iue to his name

if you doe you vill butt frame

words against your ∫elues, and lines

vher his good and your ill shines

like him vho doth ∫ett a ∫nare

For a poore betrayed hare}

(Exit Musella. Enter Philisses and Lissius)

Lissius:

O plainly deal with me; my love hath been

still firm to you, then let us not begin

to seem as strangers. If I have wronged you speak

and I'll forgiveness ask, else do not break

those bands of friendship of our long held love

which did this plainness to admiration move.

Philisses:

I cannot change, but love thee ever will

for no cross shall my first affection kill,

but give me leave that sight once loved to shun,

since by the sight I see myself undone.

Lissius:

When this opinion first possessed thy heart

would death had struck me with his cruel dart;

live I to be mistrusted by my friend?

'Tis time for me my wretched days to end,

but what began this change in thee.

Philisses: Mistrust.

Lissius:

Mistrust of me?

Philisses: I am not so unjust.

Lissius:

What then? Pray tell, my heart doth long to know.

Philisses:

Why then, the change and cause of all my woe

proceeds from this: I fear Musella's love

is placed on you, this doth my torment move,

for if she do, my friendship bound to you

must make me leave for love, or joy to sue,

for though I love her more than mine own heart,

if you affect her I will ne'er impart

my love to her; so constant friendship binds

my love where truth such faithful biding finds.

Li: [ Phili∫ses, Li∫sius,]

O.? [ O] plainly deale wt mee my loue hath bin

still firme to you then lett vs nott beegin [ begin]

to ∫eeme as strangers if I' haue wrongd you speake [ ,]

and Ile forgiunes ask, els doe nott breake

that band of freindship of our long held loue [ s]

wch all did this [ thes] plaines to admiration moue

Phi

I can nott [ cannott] change, butt loue thee euer will

for noe cro∫s shall my first affection kill,

butt giue mee leaue that ∫ight once lo'ud [ (once lou'd)] to shunn

∫ince by the ∫ight I ∫ee my ∫elf vndunn

Li:

When this opinion first po∫sest thy hart

would death had strooke mee wt his cruell dart;

liue I to bee mistrusted by my freind? [ freind]

't'is time for mee [ to end ] my wreched days to end

butt what begann [ began] this change in thee; Phi: mistrust

Li:

mistrust [ Mistrust] of mee; Phi: I ame nott ∫oe vniust

Li:

vhat then? pray [ praye] tell, my hart doth long to knowe

Phi:

Why then the change and cau∫e of all my woe

proceeds from this, I feare Mu∫ellas loue

is placed on you, this doth my torment [ torments] moue,

for [ ∫ince] if she doe, my freindship bound to you

must make mee leaue my for loue, or ioy for to ∫ue,

for though I loue her more then mine owne hart

if you affect her I will ner [ ne'er] impart

my loue to her; ∫oe constant freindship binds

my loue wher truth ∫uch faithfull biding finds

{*paste in which should follow Philisses' later speech Penshurst follows straight on.

Cupid ble∫sed bee thy might

lett thy triumph ∫ee noe night

bee thou iustly god of loue

who thus can thy glory moue

harts obay to Cupids ∫vay

prin∫es non of you ∫ay nay

eyes, lett him direct your vay

for vt out him you may stray

hee your ∫ecrett thoughts can spy

beeing hid els from each eye

lett your ∫ongs bee still of loue

write noe ∫atirs wch may proue

least offen∫iue to his name

if you doe you vill butt frame

words against your ∫elues, and lines

wher his good and your ill shines

like him vho doth ∫ett a ∫nare

For a poore betrayed hare}

Page of Huntington manuscript.

then truly speak, good Li∫sius plainly ∫ay

nor shall a loue make mee your trust betray

Li:

O my Phili∫ses, vhat vas this the cau∫e

alas ∫ee hov mi∫fortune on mee drau∫e

I loue butt vowe t'is nott Mu∫ellas face

could from my word hart my freer thoughts disp

although I must confe∫s she vorthy is

butt she allas can bring to mee noe bli∫s;

it is your ∫ister vho must end my care

nov doe you ∫ee you need noe more dispa

Phi:

yett shee may loue you can you that deny;

Li:

and ∫veare I neuer yett least shov could spy

butt vell a∫surd I ame that she doth loue

and you I venter dare doth her hart moue

t'is true she speaks to mee, butt for your ∫ake

els for good looks from her, I might leaue take

her eyes can nott di∫semble though her toungue

to speake itt ha∫ards nott a greater vrong,

her cheeks can nott command the blood, butt sh

itt word must appeere allthough against her will

thus haue I an∫werd, and adui∫e doe giue

tell her your loue if you vill happy liue

she can nott, nether will she you deny

and doe as much for mee or els I dy

Phi:

vhat may I doe that you shall nott command

then hare I gage my vord, and giue my hand

Then truly speak, good Lissius plainly say,

nor shall a love make me your trust betray.

Lissius:

O my Philisses! What? Was this the cause?

Alas, see how misfortune on me draws;

I love, but vow 'tis not Musella's face

could from my heart my freer thoughts displace,

although I must confess she worthy is,

but she alas can bring to me no bliss;

it is your sister who must end my care.

Now do you see you need no more despair?

Philisses:

Yet she may love you, can you that deny?

Lissius:

And swear I never yet least show could spy,

but well assured I am that she doth love;

and you, I venture dare, doth her heart move;

'tis true she speaks to me, but for your sake

else for good looks from her, I might leave take.

Her eyes cannot dissemble though her tongue

to speak it hazards not a greater wrong,

her cheeks cannot command the blood, but still

it must appear although against her will.

Thus have I answered, and advice do give.

Tell her your love if you will happy live;

she cannot, neither will she, you deny

and do as much for me, or else I die.

Philisses:

What may I do that you shall not command?

Then here I gauge my word, and give my hand.

If with my sister I but power have,

she shall requite you, and the love you gave

so freely to her -- but once more say this:

from fair Musella hope you for no bliss?

Lissius:

None but her friendship which I will require;

from both as equal to my best desire.

Philisses:

Then thus assured that friendship still remain

or let my soul endure endless pain.

[Exeunt]

Venus:

Cupid blessed be thy might,

let thy triumph see no night;

be thou justly god of love,

who thus can thy glory move.

Hearts obey to Cupid's sway,

princes none of you say nay,

eyes, let him direct your way,

for without him you may stray.

He your secret thoughts can spy,

being hid else from each eye;

let your songs be still of love

write no satires which may prove

least offensive to his name:

if you do you will but frame

words against yourselves, and lines

where his good, and your ill shines,

like him who doth set a snare

for a poor betrayed hare

lucklessly the snare doth prove,

Love the king is of the mind,

please him, and he will be kind;

cross him you see what doth come,

harms which make your pleasure's tomb.

Then take heed, and make your bliss

in his favour, and so miss

no content, nor joy nor peace,

but in happiness increase.

Love command your hearts and eyes

and enjoy what pleasure tries.

Cupid govern, and his care

guard your hearts from all despair. [NB This song is intended to be sung not by Venus but by her priests, as stated in the Penshurst direction]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S Wroth uses the S fermé to mark the end of acts, but she also uses it constantly in her work. There remains some uncertainty about its import, with earlier opinion by scholars like Roberts that it represented Wroth's sense of being a Sidney under a certain erasure now challnged by those who note its common use in early modern manusvcripts to denote a pause, and also by a number of women writers to mark an affectionate salutation.

then truly speak, good Li∫sius plainly ∫ay

nor shall a loue make mee your trust betray,

Li:

O my Phili∫ses, what was this the cau∫e

alas ∫ee how mi∫fortune on mee drau∫e [ drawes:]

I loue butt Vowe t'is [ 't'is] nott Mu∫ellas face

could [ cowld] from my thou hart my freer thoughts displace

although I must confe∫s she worthy is

butt she allas [ (alas)] can bring to mee noe bli∫s; [ blis;]

it [ itt] is your ∫ister who must end my care

now doe you ∫ee you need noe more dispaire

Phi:

yett shee may loue you [ ,] can you that deny; [ ?]

Li:

and ∫veare I neuer yett least show could spy

butt well a∫surd [ a∫sur'd] I ame that she doth loue [ ,]

and you I venter dare doth her hart moue

t'is true she speaks to mee, butt for your ∫ake

els for good looks from her, I might leaue take [ ,]

her eyes can nott di∫semble though her toungue

to speake itt ha∫ards nott a greater wrong, [ wronge]

her cheeks can nott [ cannott] command the blood, butt still

itt will must appeere [ ,] allthough against her will

thus [ Thus] haue I an∫werd, [ you] and adui∫e doe giue

tell her your loue if you will happy liue

she can nott, nether will she you deny [ ;]

and doe as much for mee [ ,] or els I dy

Phi:

what [ What] may I doe that you shall nott command

then heare I gage my vord, and giue my hand

{*In MS pasted in

if [ Iff ] wt my ∫ister I butt power [ powre] haue

she shall requite, you, and the loue you gaue [ your ∫orrow ∫aue,]

∫oe freely to her [ wt gift of her loue,] butt once more ∫ay this

from faire Mu∫ella hope you for noe blis [ bli∫s?]

Li:

Non butt her freindship, wch I will require

from both as equall to my best de∫ire,

Phi:

Then thus a∫sur'd that freindship still [ shall] remaine

or lett my ∫oule endure endles [ eternall] paine; Ex:}

Venus; [ Venus Priests to Loue, or his

Cupid ble∫sed bee thy might

lett thy triumph ∫ee noe night

bee thou iustly god [ God] of loue [ Loue]

who thus can thy glory moue

harts obay to Cupids ∫vay

prin∫es [ Princes] non of you ∫ay nay

eyes, [ Eyes] lett him direct your way

for wt ovt him you may stray

hee your ∫ecrett thoughts can spy

beeing hid els from each eye

lett your [ yor] ∫ongs bee still of loue

write noe ∫atirs [ Satires] wch may proue

least offen∫iue to his name

if you doe you will butt frame

words against your ∫elues, and lines

wher his good, and your ill shines

like him who doth ∫ett a ∫nare

For [ for] a poore betrayed hare

{Continued on the other side of the paste in}

and that thing hee best doth loue

luckle∫ly [ lucklesly] the ∫nare doth proue,

Loue the king is of the mind

plea∫e him, and hee will bee kind

cro∫s him [ ,] you ∫ee what doth com

harmes wch make your plea∫ures tomb [ tombe,]

then take heed, and make your blis

in his fauour, [ fauor,] and ∫oe mi∫s

noe content, nor [ noe] ioy nor pea∫e [ peace]

butt still in all hapines increa∫e,

Loue command your harts [ ,] and eyes

and inioy [ enioy] vhat plea∫ure tries

Cupid gouern, [ gouerne,] and his care

guard [ guide] your harts from all dispaire; S

S [ ;/ flourish]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

The 3 Act;/

Siluesta;

Silent woods wt de∫arts shade

giuing peace

wher all plea∫ures first ar made

to increa∫e

giue your fauor to my mone

now my louing time is gone

Chastity my plea∫ure is

folly fled

from hence now I ∫eeke my blis

cro∫s loue dead

In your shadows I repo∫e

you then loue I now haue cho∫e

Mu:

Choi∫e ill made were better left

beeing cro∫s

of ∫uch choi∫e to bee bereft

were no lo∫s

{*In MS pasted in

if vt my sister I butt pover haue

she shall requite you, and the loue you gaue

∫oe freely to he butt once more ∫ay this

from faire Mu∫ella hope you for noe blis

Li:

Non butt her freindship vch I vill require

From both as equall to my best de∫ire

Phi:

then thus a∫surd that freindship still remaine

or lett my ∫oule indure endles paine; ex}

Venus;

Cupid ble∫sed bee thy might

lett thy triumph ∫ee noe night

bee thou iustly god of loue

who thus can thy glory moue

harts obay to Cupids ∫vay

prin∫es non of you ∫ay nay

eyes, lett him direct your vay

for vt out him you may stray

hee your ∫ecrett thoughts can spy

beeing hid els from each eye

lett your ∫ongs bee still of loue

write noe ∫atirs vch may proue

least offen∫iue to his name

if you doe you vill butt frame

words against your ∫elues, and lines

vher his good, and your ill shines

like him vho doth ∫ett a ∫nare

For a poore betrayed hare

{Continued on the other side of the paste in}

and that thing hee best doth loue

luckle∫ly the ∫nare doth proue,

Loue the king is of the mind

plea∫e him, and hee will bee kind

cro∫s him you ∫ee what doth com

harmes wch make your plea∫ures tomb

then take heed, and make your blis

in his fauour, and ∫oe mi∫s

noe content, nor ioy nor pea∫e

butt still in all hapines increa∫e,

Loue command your harts and eyes

and inioy vhat plea∫ure tries

Cupid gouern, and his care

guard your harts from all dispaire; S

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in mee was: Silvesta here underlines her choice of chastity as a response to loving Philisses but understanding tht he loves Musella: it is accordingly a strategic choice on her part, rather than just a blind response. It is accordingly fitting that Silvesta (apparently acting for Venus) arranges Musella's escape from marriage to Rustic.

The 3 Act;/ [ The third Act.]

Siluesta;

Silent woods wt de∫arts shade

giuing peace

wher all plea∫ures first ar made

to increa∫e

giue your fauor to my mone

now my louing time is gone [ :]

Chastity my plea∫ure is

folly fled

from hence now I ∫eeke my blis

cro∫s loue dead

In your shadows [ shadowes] I repo∫e

you then loue I now haue [ rather] cho∫e

Mu:

Choi∫e ill made were better left

beeing cro∫s

of ∫uch choi∫e [ choice] to bee bereft

were no [ noe] lo∫s

Chastity my plea∫ure is

folly fled

from hence now I ∫eeke my blis

cro∫s loue dead

In your shadows [ shadowes] I repo∫e

you then loue I now haue [ rather] cho∫e

Mu: [ Mu∫ella. ]

Choi∫e ill made were better left

beeing cro∫s

of ∫uch choi∫e to bee bereft

were no lo∫s

chastity [ Chastitie] you thus commend

doth proceed butt from loues end

And if loue the fountane was

of your fire

loue must chastitie ∫urpas

in de∫ire

loue lost bred your chastest thought

chastity [ Chastitie] by loue is wrought

Sill: [ Si:]

Ô poore Mu∫ella, now I pitty thee

I ∫ee thou'rt bound [ ,] who most haue made vnfree

t'is true di∫daine of my loue made mee turne,

and hapily I think, butt you to burne

in loues faulce [ faul∫e] fires your ∫elf, [ yor∫elf] poor [ poore] ∫oule take heed

bee ∫ure beefor [ beefore] you too much pine to speede [ speed,]

you know [ knowe] I loued [ lou'd] haue, [ butt] behold my gaine,

this you dislike I purcha∫'d wt loues paine

and true felt ∫orrow, yett my an∫wer was

from (my then deere) Phili∫ses you must pas

vnlou'd by mee, and for your owne good leaue

to vrg [ vrge] that wch most vrgd, [ vrg'd] can butt de∫eaue [ deceaue,]

yor [ your] hopes, for know Mu∫ella is my loue [ ,]

as then of duty I should [ showld] noe more moue

and this his will hee gott, yett nott his minde [ mind,]

for yett itt ∫eemes you ar noe le∫s vnkind [ ;]

Mu:

Wrong mee nott chast Siluesta t'is my greif [ griefe]

that from poore mee hee will nott take reliefe [ ,]

Sill: [ Si:]

What, will hee lo∫e [ loo∫e]what hee did most de∫ire [ ?]

Mu:

Soe is hee led [ lead] away wt iealous fire

And this ∫illuesta [ Siluesta] butt to you I speak, [ speake]

for ∫ouner [ ∫ooner] should [ showld] my hart wt [ wth] ∫ilence break [ breake,]

then any els should [ showld] heere [ hear] mee thus much ∫ay

butt you, who I know will not mee betray [ beetray.]

Sill: [ Si:]

betray [ Betray] Mu∫ella, [ ?] ∫ouner [ ∫ooner ] will I dy

noe I do [ doe] loue you, nor will help deny

that [ what] lies in mee to bring your care to end

or ∫eruice wch to your content may tend

for when I lou'd Phili∫ses as my lyfe

par∫eauing hee lou'd [ loud] you, I killd [ kild] the strife,

wch in mee was,* yett doe I wish his good,

and for his ∫ake loue you, though I wth stood

good fortunes [ ,] this chast lyfe well plea∫eth mee [ ,]

and yett ioy most [ would ioy more] if you tow hapy bee

few would [ fewe wowld] ∫ay this, butt fewer would [ wowld] itt doe

butt th'one I lou'd, and loue the other too, [ tooe:]

Mu:

I know you lou'd him, nor could I the le∫s

att [ that] time loue you, ∫oe did hee po∫ses

my hart as my thought all harts ∫ure must yeild [ yeeld]

to loue him most, and best, who in this field

doth liue and haue [ hath] nott had ∫ome kind of touch [ tuch]

to like him, butt ô you, and I to much

Sill: [ Sil:]

Mine is now past tell mee now what yors [ yours] is

and I'l [ I'le] wish butt the meanes to work yor [ your] blis

Mu:

Then know [ knowe] Siluesta I Phili∫ses loue,

butt hee allthough, (or that becau∫e) hee loues

doth mee mistrust (ah) can ∫uch mi∫chief [ mi∫chiefe] moue

as to mistrust her who such pa∫sion proues; [ proues!]

butt ∫oe hee doth, and thinks I haue Li∫sius made

master of my affections wch hath staid [ stayd]

him euer yett from letting mee itt know

by words allthough hee hid's [ hides] itt nott from show, [ showe]

∫ome times [ somtimes] I faine Would speake then straite forbeare

knowing itt most vnfitt; thus woe I beare [ ;]

Sill: [ Si:]

indeed [ Indeed] a woman to make loue is ill

butt heere, [ heare,] and you may all thes ∫orrowes kill;

hee poore distre∫sed sheapherd [ sheapheard] eur'y morne

befor the ∫unn to our [ owr] eyes new is borne

walks [ waulks] in this place, and heer [ heere] alone doth cry,

against his lyfe, and your great cruelty;

now, [ now] ∫ince you loue ∫oe much, come butt, [ heere] and find

him in thes woes, and show your ∫elf butt kind

you ∫oune [ ∫oone] shall ∫ee a hart ∫oe truly wunn [ wun]

as you would nott itt mi∫s to bee vndunn; [ vndun,]

Mu:

Silluesta [ Siluesta] for this loue I can butt ∫ay

that peece of hart wch is nott giuen away

shalbee your owne, the rest will you ob∫erue

as ∫auor of tow harts, wch tow: [ too] will ∫erue

you euer wt ∫oe true, and constant loue

yor [ your] chastity itt ∫elf shall itt aproue.

Sill:

I doe beleeue itt; for in ∫oe much worth

as liues in you Vertue [ Vertu] must neds spring [ break] forth;

and for Phili∫ses I loue him & [ and] will

in chastest ∫eruice hinder still his ill,

then keepe your time [ ,] alas [ ,] lett him nott dy

for whom ∫oe many ∫ufferd [ suffred] mi∫ery

Mu:

Lett mee noe ioy receaue if I neglect

this kind adui∫e, [ advice,] or him I ∫oe respect

Sill:

farewell [ Farwell] mu∫ella, [ Musella] loue, and hapy bee ex,

Mu:

And bee thou blest that thus doth comfort mee ex,

Page of Huntington manuscript.

then truly speak, good Li∫sius plainly ∫ay

nor shall a loue make mee your trust betray

Li:

O my Phili∫ses, vhat vas this the cau∫e alas ∫ee hov mi∫fortune on mee drau∫e

I loue butt vowe t'is nott Mu∫ellas face

could from my word hart my freer thoughts disp

although I must confe∫s she vorthy is

butt she allas can bring to mee noe bli∫s;

it is your ∫ister vho must end my care

nov doe you ∫ee you need noe more dispa

Phi:

yett shee may loue you can you that deny;

Li:

and ∫veare I neuer yett least shov could spy

butt vell a∫surd I ame that she doth loue

and you I venter dare doth her hart moue

and that thing hee best doth loue

luckle∫ly the ∫nare doth proue,

Loue the king is of the mind

plea∫e him, and hee vill bee kind

cro∫s him you ∫ee vhat doth com

harmes wch make your plea∫ures tomb

then take heed, and make your blis

in his fauour, and ∫oe mi∫s

noe content, nor ioy nor pea∫e

butt word in word hapines increa∫e,

Loue command your harts and eyes

and inioy vhat plea∫ure tries

Cupid gouern, and his care

guard your harts from all dispaire; ƒ

ƒ

Page of Huntington manuscript.

The 3 Act;/

Siluesta;

Silent woods wt de∫arts shade

giuing peace

wher all plea∫ures first ar made

to increa∫e

giue your fauor to my mone

now my louing time is gone

Chastity my plea∫ure is

folly fled

from hence now I ∫eeke my blis

cro∫s loue dead

In your shadows I repo∫e

you then loue I now haue cho∫e

Mu:

Choi∫e ill made were better left

beeing cro∫s

of ∫uch choi∫e to bee bereft

were no lo∫s

chastity you thus commend

doth proceed butt from loues end

And if loue the fountane was

of your fire

loue must chastitie ∫urpas

in de∫ire

loue lost bred your chastest thought

chastity by loue is wrought

Sill:

Ô poore Mu∫ella, now I pitty thee

I ∫ee thou'rt bound who most haue made vnfree

t'is true di∫daine of my loue made mee turne,

and hapily I think, butt you to burne

in loues faulce fires your ∫elf, poor ∫oule take heed

bee ∫ure beefor you too much pine to speede

you know I loued haue, behold my gaine,

this you dislike I purcha∫'d wt loues paine

and true felt ∫orrow, yett my an∫wer was

from (my then deere) Phili∫ses you must pas

vnlou'd by mee, and for your owne good leaue

to vrg that wch most vrgd, can butt de∫eaue

yor hopes, for know Mu∫ella is my loue

as then of duty I should noe more moue

and this his will hee gott, yett nott his minde

for yett itt ∫eemes you ar noe le∫s vnkind

Mu:

wrong mee nott chast Siluesta t'is my greif

that from poore mee hee will nott take reliefe

Sill:

What, will hee lo∫e What hee did most de∫ire

Mu:

Soe is hee led away wt iealous fire

And this ∫illuesta butt to you I speak,

for ∫ouner should my hart wt ∫ilence break

then any els should heere mee thus much ∫ay

butt you, who I know will not mee betray

Act Three

Silvesta:

Silent woods with deserts shade,

giving peace.

where all pleasures first are made

to increase.

Give your favour to my moan

now my loving time is gone.

Chastity my pleasure is.

Folly fled

from hence, now I seek my bliss.

Cross love dead,

in your shadows I repose;

you than love I now have chose.

Musella:

Choice ill made were better left,

being cross.

Of such choice to be bereft

were no loss.

Chastity, you thus commend,

doth proceed but from love's end.

And if love the fountain was

of your fire,

love must chastity surpass

in desire.

Love lost bred your chastest thought,

chastity by love is wrought

Silvesta:

O poor Musella, now I pity thee.

I see thou'rt bound who most have made unfree.

'Tis true disdain of my love made me turn,

and happily I think, but you to burn

in love's false fires yourself; poor soul take heed,

be sure before you too much pine to speed.

You know I loved have, behold my gain,

this you dislike I purchased with love's pain

and true felt sorrow, yet my answer was

from (my then dear) Philisses 'you must pass

unloved by me, and for your own good leave

to urge that which most urged, can but deceive

your hopes. For know, Musella is my love.'

As then of duty I should no more move

and this his will he got, yet not his mind,

for yet it seems you are no less unkind.

Musella:

Wrong me not chaste Silvesta; 'tis my grief

that from poor me he will not take relief.

Silvesta:

What, will he lose what he did most desire?

Musella:

So is he led away with jealous fire,

and this Silvesta but to you I speak,

for sooner should my heart with silence break

than any else should hear me thus much say

but you, who I know will not me betray.

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Sill:

betray Mu∫ella, ∫ouner will I dy

noe I do loue you, nor will help deny

that lies in mee to bring your care to end

or ∫eruice wch to your content may tend

for When I lou'd Phili∫ses as my lyfe

par∫eauing hee lou'd you, I killd the strife,

wch in mee was, yett doe I wish his good,

and for his ∫ake loue you, though I wth stood

good fortunes this chast lyfe well plea∫eth mee

and yett ioy most if you tow hapy bee

few would ∫ay this, butt fewer would itt doe

butt th'one I lou'd, and loue the other too,

Mu:

I know you lou'd him, nor could I the le∫s

att time loue you, ∫oe did hee po∫ses

my hart as my thought all harts ∫ure must yeild

to loue him most, and best, who in this field

doth liue and haue nott had ∫ome kind of touch

to like him, butt ô you, and I to much

Sill:

Mine is now past tell mee now what yors is

and I'l wish butt the meanes to work yor blis

Mu:

Then know Siluesta I Phili∫ses loue,

butt hee allthough, (or that becau∫e) hee loues

doth mee mistrust (ah) can ∫uch mi∫chief moue

as to mistrust her who ∫uch pa∫sion proues;

butt ∫oe hee doth, and thinks I haue Li∫sius made

master of my affections wch hath staid

him euer yett from letting mee itt know

by words allthough hee hid's itt nott from show,

∫ome times I faine Would speake then straite forbeare

knowing itt most vnfitt; thus woe I beare

Sill:

indeed a woman to make loue is ill

butt heere, and you may all thes ∫orrowes kill;

hee poore distre∫sed sheapherd eur'y morne

befor the ∫unn to our eyes new is borne

walks in this place, and heer alone doth cry,

against his lyfe, and your great cruelty;

now, ∫ince you loue ∫oe much, come butt, and find

him in thes woes, and show your ∫elf butt kind

you ∫oune shall ∫ee a hart ∫oe truly wunn

as you would nott itt mi∫s to bee vndunn;

Mu:

Silluesta for this loue I can butt ∫ay

that peece of hart wch is nott giuen away

shalbee your owne, the rest will you ob∫erue

as ∫auor of tow harts, wch tow: will ∫erue

you euer Wt∫oe true, and constant loue

yor chastity itt ∫elf shall itt aproue.

Silvesta:

Betray Musella? Sooner will I die.

No, I do love you, nor will help deny

that lies in me to bring your care to end,

or service which to your content may tend.

For when I loved Philisses as my life,

perceiving he loved you, I killed the strife,

which in me was, yet do I wish his good,

and for his sake love you, though I withstood

good fortunes. This chaste life well pleaseth me

and yet joy most if you two happy be.

Few would say this, but fewer would it do,

but th'one I loved, and love the other too.

Musella:

I know you loved him, nor could I the less

at time love you, so did he possess

my heart as my thought all hearts sure must yield

to love him most, and best, who in this field

doth live and have not had some kind of touch

to like him, but O you and I too much!

Silvesta:

Mine is now past, tell me now what yours is,

and I'll wish but the means to work your bliss.

Musella:

Then know, Silvesta, I Philisses love,

but he although, (or that because) he loves

doth me mistrust. (Ah) can such mischief move

as to mistrust her who such passion proves?

But so he doth, and thinks I have Lissius made

master of my affections, which hath stayed

him ever yet from letting me it know

by words, although he hides it not from show.

Sometimes I fain would speak than straight forbear,

knowing it most unfit; thus woe I bear.

Silvesta:

Indeed, a woman to make love is ill

but hear, and you may all these sorrows kill;

he poor distressed shepherd ev'ry morn,

before the Sun to our eyes new is born,

walks in this place, and here alone doth cry,

against his life, and your great cruelty.

Now, since you love so much, come but, and find

him in these woes, and show yourself but kind,

you soon shall see a heart so truly won

as you would not it miss to be undone.

Musella:

Silvesta, for this love I can but say

that piece of heart which is not given away

shall be your own, the rest will you observe

as savour of two hearts, which two will serve

you ever with so true, and constant love

your chastity itself shall it approve.

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Sill:

I doe beleeue itt; for in ∫oe much worth

as liues in you Vertue must neds spring forth;

and for Phili∫ses I loue him &? will

in chastest ∫eruice hinder still his ill,

then keepe your time alas lett him nott dy

for whom ∫oe many ∫ufferd mi∫ery

Mu:

Lett mee noe ioy receaue if I neglect

this kind adui∫e, or him I ∫oe respect

Sill:

farewell mu∫ella, loue, and hapy bee ex,

Mu:

And bee thou blest that thus doth comfort mee ex,

Phili∫ses

O wreched man: and thou all conquering loue

wch showst thy pouer still on haples mee

yett giue mee leaue in thes ∫weet shades to moue

rest, but to show, my killing mi∫erie;

and bee once plea∫d to know my wreched fate,

and ∫omthing pitty, my ill, and my state

Could euer Nature, or the heauns e're frame

∫oe rare a part ∫o like them ∫elues deuine

and yett that work be blotted wt the blame

of cruelty, and dark bee, who should shine;

To bee the brightest star, of deerest pri∫e,

and yett to murder harts wch to her cries

Cry, and euen att the point of death for care

yett haue I nothing left mee butt dispaire,

despaire, ô butt dispaire, alas hath hope

noe better portion, nor a greater ∫cope

well then dispaire wt my lyfe coupled bee,

and for my ∫oddaine end doe ∫oune agree,

Ay! mee vnfortunate would I could dy

butt ∫oe ∫oune as this company I fly ex:

Dalina, Climena,

Simena, fillis

Dalina

Now wee're alone lett euery one confe∫s

truly to other what our lucks haue bin

how often lik'd, and lou'd, and ∫oe expre∫s

our pa∫sions past shall wee this sport beegin,

non can accu∫e vs, non can vs betray,

vnles our ∫elues, our owne ∫elues will bewray,

Fillis

I like this, butt will each one truly tell

Cli:

trust mee I will, who doth nott, doth nott well

Si:

I'le plainly speake butt who shalbe the first

Dalina

Silvesta:

I do believe it; for in so much worth

as lives in you, virtue must needs spring forth;

and for Philisses I love him and will

in chastest service hinder still his ill.

Then keep your time, alas, let him not die

for whom so many suffered misery.

Musella:

Let me no joy receive if I neglect

this kind advice, or him I so respect.

Silvesta:

Farewell Musella, love, and happy be

Exit Silvesta

Musella:

And be thou blest that thus doth comfort me.

Exit Musella

Philisses:

O wretched man: and thou all conquering love

which showest thy power still on hapless me,

yet give me leave in these sweet shades to move,

rest, but to show my killing misery;

and be once pleased to know my wretched fate,

and something pity my ill, and my state,

Could ever Nature, or the heav'ns e'er frame

so rare a part so like themselves divine

and yet that work be blotted with the blame

of cruelty, and dark be, who should shine;

To be the brightest star, of dearest prize,

and yet to murder hearts which to her cries.

Cry, and even at the point of death for care,

yet have I nothing left me but despair,

despair, O but despair. Alas, hath hope

no better portion, nor a greater scope?

Well then, despair with my life coupled be,

and for my sudden end do sound agree.

Aye me unfortunate, would I could die

but so sound as this company I fly.

Exit Philisses.

Enter Dalina, Climena,Simena, Phillis

Dalina:

Now we're alone let everyone confess

truly to other what our lucks have been,

how often liked, and loved, and so express

our passions past. Shall we this sport begin?

None can accuse us, none can us betray,

unless ourselves, our own selves will betray.

Phillis:

I like this, but will each one truly tell?

Climena:

Trust me I will; who doth not, doth not well.

Simena:

I'll plainly speak, but who shall be the first?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phili∫ses [ Phi:]

O wreched man: and thou all conquering loue

wch showst thy pouer [ poure] still on haples mee

yett giue mee leaue in thes ∫weet shades to moue

rest, [ rest] but to show, [ show] my killing mi∫erie;

and bee once plea∫d to know my wreched fate,

and ∫omthing [ ∫omething] pitty, my ill, and my state

Could euer Nature, or the heauns e're frame

∫oe rare a part ∫o [ ∫oe] like them ∫elues deuine [ ?]

and yett that work [ wourk] be blotted wt the blame

of cruelty, and dark bee, who should shine; [ ,]

To [ to] bee the brightest star, of deerest pri∫e, [ pryse,]

and yett to murder harts wch to her cries [ ,]

Cry, [ cry,] and euen att the point of death for care [ ,]

yett haue I nothing left mee butt dispaire,

despaire,[ Dispaire] ô butt dispaire, [ ?] alas hath hope

noe better portion, [ ?] nor a greater ∫cope [ ?]

well [ Well] then dispaire wt my lyfe coupled bee,

and for my ∫oddaine end doe ∫oune [ ∫oone] agree,

Ay! mee [ Ay mee] vnfortunate would I could dy

butt ∫oe ∫oune [ ∫oone] as this company I fly ex: [ :ex:]

Dalina, Climena,

Simena, [ Simeana] fillis [ Fillis]

Dalina [ Da:]

Now wee're [ w'are] alone lett euery one confe∫s

truly to other what our lucks haue bin

how often lik'd, and lou'd, and ∫oe expre∫s

our [ owr] pa∫sions past [ :] shall wee this sport beegin, [ begin?]

non can accu∫e vs, non can vs betray,

vnles our ∫elues, our owne ∫elues will bewray,

Fillis [ Fi:]

I like this, butt will each one truly tell [ ?]

Cli:

trust [ Trust] mee I will, who doth nott, doth nott well [ ,]

Si:

I'le plainly speake butt who shalbe the first

Dalina [ Da:]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Da:

I can ∫ay least of all yett I will speake

A sheapherd once ther was, and nott the wurst

of tho∫e were most esteem'd who∫e sleepe did breake

wt loue for-∫outhe of mee, I found itt thought

I might haue him att lea∫ure, lik'd him nott,

then was ther to our hou∫e a farmer brought

rich, and liuely; butt tho∫e bought nott his lott

for loue; tow Jolly youthes att last ther came

wch both mee thought I very well could loue

when one was ab∫ent t'other had the name,

in my staid hart hee pre∫ent did most moue

both att a time in ∫ight I ∫carce could ∫ay

wch of the tow I then Would wish away

butt they found how to chu∫e, and as I was

like changing, like vn∫ertaine lett mee pa∫s,

Si:

I would nott this beeleeue if other tongue

should this report butt think itt had bin wrong

butt ∫ince you speake this could nott you agree

to chu∫e ∫ome one butt this vncho∫en bee

Da:

truly nott I, I plainly tell the truth

yett doe confe∫s t'was folly in my youth

wch now I'le mend the next that comes I'le haue

I will noe more bee foulish, nor delay

∫ince I do ∫ee the lads will labor ∫aue

one an∫were rids them, I'le noe more ∫ay nay

but if hee ∫ay Dalina will you loue,

and thank you I'le ∫ay if you will proue;

the next go on, and tell what you haue dun

Si:

I am the next, and haue butt lo∫ses wunn

butt yett I constant was, thoug still reiected

lou'd, and nott lou'd I was, lik'd, and neglected

yett now ∫ome hope reuiues when loue thought dead

doth like the spring=young bud When leaues ar fled,

Fillis

Yor hap's the better, would mine were as good

though I as long as you dispi∫ed stood,

for I haue lou'd, and lou'd butt only one,

yett I di∫daind could butt receaue yt mone

wch others doe for thou∫ands ∫oe vniust

is loue to tho∫e who in him most doe trust

nor did I euer lett my thoughts bee showne

butt to Mu∫ella who all els hath knowne

wch was long time I had Phili∫es lou'd

and euer would though hee did mee dispi∫e

for them allthough hee euer cruell prou'd

from him nott mee the fault must needs ari∫e,

and if Simena thus your brother deere

should bee vnkind my loue shall still be cleere;

Dalina:

I can say least of all, yet I will speak.

A shepherd once there was, and not the worst

of those were most esteemed, whose sleep did break

with love forsooth of me. I found it, thought

I might have him at leisure, liked him not.

Then was there to our house a farmer brought,

rich, and lively, but those bought not his lot

for love. Two jolly youths at last there came

which both me thought I very well could love.

When one was absent t'other had the name,

in my staid heart he present did most move.

Both at a time in sight, I scarce could say

which of the two I then would wish away.

But they found how to choose, and as I was

like changing, like uncertain, let me pass.

Simena:

I would not this believe if other tongue

should this report, but think it had been wrong,

but since you speak this, could not you agree

to choose someone but this unchosen be?

Dalina:

Truly not I, I plainly tell the truth,

yet do confess 'twas folly in my youth

which now I'll mend. The next that comes I'll have;

I will no more be foolish, nor delay,

since I do see the lads will labour save.

One answer rids them, I'll no more say nay,

but if he say 'Dalina will you love?'

and 'thank you', I'll say; 'if you will prove.'

The next go on, and tell what you have done.

Simena:

I am the next, and have but losses won,

but yet I constant was, though still rejected.

Loved, and not loved I was, liked, and neglected,

yet now some hope revives when love thought dead

doth like the spring-young bud when leaves are fled.

Phillis:

Your hap's the better, would mine were as good,

though I as long as you despised stood.

For I have loved, and loved but only one,

yet I disdained could but receive that moan

which others do for thousands. So unjust

is love to those who in him most do trust.

Nor did I ever let my thoughts be shown

but to Musella, who all else hath known,

which was long time I had Philisses loved

and ever would though he did me despise.

For then, although he ever cruel proved,

from him not me the fault must needs arise,

and if, Simena, thus your brother dear

should be unkind, my love shall still be clear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the truth: indeed as noted above Dalina accepts Rustic's proposal at the end of the play

Da:

I can ∫ay least of all yett I will speake

A sheapherd once ther was, and nott the wurst

of tho∫e were most esteem'd who∫e [ who] sleepe did breake

wt loue for-∫outhe [ for∫ooth] of mee, I found itt thought

I might haue him att lea∫ure, lik'd him nott, [ nott]

then was ther to our [ owr] hou∫e a farmer brought

rich, and liuely; [ liuely] butt tho∫e bought nott his lott

for loue; [ :] tow Jolly [ iolly] youthes [ youths] att last ther came

wch both mee thought I very [ verie] well could loue

when one was ab∫ent t'other had the name, [ name]

in my staid [ stayd] hart hee pre∫ent did most moue

both att a [ one] time in ∫ight I ∫carce could ∫ay

wch of the tow I then Would [ wowld] wish away

butt they found how to chu∫e, and as I was

like changing, like vn∫ertaine [ vncertaine,] lett mee pa∫s, [ pas:/]

Si:

I would [ wowld] nott this beeleeue if other tongue [ toungue]

should this report butt think itt had bin wrong [ ,]

butt ∫ince you speake this could nott you agree

to chu∫e ∫ome one butt this [ thus] vncho∫en bee [ ?]

Da:

truly [ Truly] nott I, I plainly tell the truth*

yett doe confe∫s t'was folly in my youth

wch now I'le mend the next that comes I'le haue [ the next that coms this fault I'le mend, and haue]

I will noe more bee foulish, nor [ or] delay

∫ince I do ∫ee the lads will labor ∫aue

one an∫were rids them, I'le noe more ∫ay nay [ :]

but if hee ∫ay Dalina will you loue, [ ?]

and thank you I'le [ I will] ∫ay if you will proue; [ .]

the next go [ goe] on, and tell what you haue dun

Si:

I am [ ame] the next, and haue butt lo∫ses wunn [ wun]

butt yett I [ yett still I] constant was, thoug [ though] still reiected

lou'd, and nott lou'd I was, lik'd, and neglected

yett now ∫ome hope reuiues [ hopes remaines] when loue thought dead

doth like the spring=young bud [ proues like the spring's young bud,] When leaues ar fled,

Fillis

Yor [ your] hap's the better, would [ wowld] mine were as good

though I as long as you dispi∫ed stood,

for I haue lou'd, and lou'd butt only one,

yett I di∫daind [ di∫daine'd] could butt receaue yt [ that] mone

wch others doe for thou∫ands ∫oe vniust

is loue to tho∫e who in him most doe trust

nor did I euer lett my thoughts bee showne

butt to Mu∫ella who all els hath knowne

wch was long time I had Phili∫es lou'd.

and euer would though hee did mee dispi∫e

for then allthough hee [ had] euer cruell prou'd

from him nott mee the fault must needs ari∫e,

and if Simena [ Simeana] thus your brother deere

should [ showld] bee vnkind my loue shall still be cleere; [ .]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Si:

T'is well re∫olu'd but how lik'd she you yor choy∫e

did she or blame or els your mind commend

Fi:

Niether she ∫eem'd to dislike or, reioi∫e

nor did comend I did this loue intend

butt ∫miling ∫aid 't'were best to bee adui∫'d

comfort itt were to win butt death dispi∫'de

S

I doe beeleeue her; butt climena yett

hath nothing ∫aid wee must nott her forgett

Cli:

Why you haue ∫aid enough for you, and mee

yett for your ∫akes I will the order keepe

who though I stranger heere by birthe I bee,

and in Arcadia euer kept my sheepe

yett heere itt is my fortune wth the rest

of you to like, and louing bee oprest;

for ∫ince I came I did a louer turne,

and turne I did indeed when I lou'd heere

∫ince for an other I in loue did burne

to whom I thought I had bin held as deere

butt was de∫eau'd when I for him had left

my freinds and country was of him bereft,

and all, butt that you kindly did imbrace,

and welcome mee into this hapy place

wher for your ∫akes I ment to keep ∫ome sheep word

nott doubting euer to bee more de∫eau'd

butt now alas I am anew beereau'd

of hart, now time itt is my ∫elf to keepe,

and lett flocks goe, vnles ∫imeana plea∫e

to giue con∫ent, and ∫oe giue mee ∫ome ea∫e

Si:

Why what haue I to do wt whom you loue

Cli:

beecau∫e t'is hee who doth your pa∫sion moue,

Si:

The les I fear the wining of his loue

∫ince all my faith could neuer ∫o much moue,

yett can hee nott ∫oe cruell euer bee

butt hee may liue my mi∫erie to ∫ee,

Cli:

And when his eyes to loue shall open bee

I trust hee will turne pitty vnto mee,

and lett mee haue reward wch is my due

Si:

Wch is your due, what pitty's due to you

dreame you of hope? ô you to high aspire

think you to gaine by kindling an old fire?

Cli:

My loue wilbee the ∫urer when I know

nott loue alone; butt how loue to bestow,

Si:

You make him yett for all this butt to bee

the ∫ecound in your loue, ∫oe was nott hee

in mine, butt first, and last of all, the chiefe

that can to mee bring ∫orrow, or reliefe

Cli:

Simena:

'Tis well resolved, but how liked she you your choice?

Did she or blame, or else your mind commend?

Phillis:

Neither she seemed to dislike or rejoice,

nor did commend I did this love intend.

But smiling said 'twere best to be advised,

comfort it were to win but death despised.

Simena:

I do believe her; but Climena yet

hath nothing said we must not her forget.

Climena:

Why you have said enough for you, and me,

yet for your sakes I will the order keep,

who though I stranger here by birth I be,

and in Arcadia ever kept my sheep,

yet here it is my fortune with the rest

of you to like, and loving be oppressed.

For since I came I did a lover turn,

and turn I did indeed when I loved here.

Since for another I in love did burn

to whom I thought I had been held as dear,

but was deceived. When I for him had left

my friends and country was of him bereft,

and all, but that you kindly did embrace,

and welcome me into this happy place,

where for your sakes I meant to keep some sheep,

not doubting ever to be more deceived.

But now, alas, I am anew bereaved

of heart, now time it is myself to keep,

and let flocks go, unless Simena please

to give consent, and so give me some ease.

Simena:

Why, what have I to do with whom you love?

Climena:

Because 'tis he who doth your passion move.

Simena:

The less I fear the wining of his love,

since all my faith could never so much move,

yet can he not so cruel ever be,

but he may live my misery to see.

Climena:

And when his eyes to love shall open be,

I trust he will turn pity unto me,

and let me have reward which is my due.

Simena:

Which is your due! What pity's due to you?

Dream you of hope? O you too high aspire.

Think you to gain by kindling an old fire?

Climena:

My love will be the surer when I know

not love alone, but how love to bestow.

Simena:

You make him yet for all this but to be

the second in your love, so was not he

in mine, but first, and last of all, the chief

that can to me bring sorrow, or relief.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arcadia: traditional country of pastoral but also perhaps a homage to Wroth's uncle Philip Sidney's prose romance Arcadia.

Si:

T'is well re∫olu'd but how lik'd she you yor [ yor] choy∫e

did she or blame or els your mind commend [ ?]

Fi:

Niether she ∫eem'd to dislike or, [ or] reioi∫e

nor did comend I did this loue intend

butt ∫miling ∫aid [ told mee] 't'were best to bee adui∫'d

comfort itt were to win butt death dispi∫'de [ dispi∫'d,]

S [ Si:]

I doe beeleeue her; butt climena [ Climeana] yett

hath nothing ∫aid wee must nott her forgett

Cli:

Why you haue ∫aid [ ∫ayd] enough for you, and mee

yett for your [ yor] ∫akes I will the order keepe

who though I stranger heere by birthe I bee,

and in Arcadia* euer kept my sheepe [ ,]

yett heere itt is my fortune wth the rest

of you to like, and louing bee oprest;

for ∫ince I came I did a louer turne,

and turne I did indeed when I lou'd heere [ ,]

∫ince for an other I in loue did burne

to whom I thought I had bin [ binn] held as deere

butt was de∫eau'd [ deceau'd] when I for him had left

my freinds [ ,] and country was of him bereft,

and all, butt that you kindly did imbrace,

and welcome [ wellcome] mee into this hapy place [ ,]

wher for your ∫akes I ment to keep ∫ome sheep to keepe

nott doubting euer to bee more de∫eau'd [ deceau'd,]

butt now alas I am [ ame] anew beereau'd [ bereaud]

of hart, now time itt is my ∫elf to keepe,

and lett flocks goe, vnles ∫imeana plea∫e

to giue con∫ent, and ∫oe giue mee ∫ome ea∫e

Si:

Why what haue I to do wt [ wth] whom you loue

Cli:

beecau∫e t'is [ 't'is] hee who doth your [ yor] pa∫sion moue, [ proue;]

Si:

The les [ le∫ser need ] I fear the wining [ winning] of his loue

∫ince all my faith could [ cowld] neuer ∫o much moue,

yett can hee nott ∫oe cruell euer bee

butt hee may liue my mi∫erie to ∫ee,

Cli:

And when his eyes to loue shall open bee

I trust hee will turne pitty vnto mee,

and lett mee haue reward wch is my due

Si:

Wch is your due, [ ?] what pitty's due to you [ ?]

dreame you of hope? ô you to high aspire

think you to gaine by kindling an old fire?

Cli:

My loue wilbee [ wilbe] the ∫urer [ ,] when I know

nott loue alone; [ ,] butt how loue to bestow,

Si:

You make him yett for all this butt to bee

the ∫ecound in your loue, ∫oe was nott hee

in mine, butt first, and last [ ,] of all, [ all] the chiefe

that can to mee bring ∫orrow, or reliefe [ ,]

Cli:

This will not win him, you may taulke, and hope

butt, [ butt] in loues pa∫sages ther is larg ∫cope [ ,]

Si:

T'is true, and you haue ∫cope to chang, [ change,] and chu∫e

to take, and dislike, like, and ∫oune [ ∫oone] refu∫e,

Cli:

My loue as firme is to him as is thine

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Cli:

This will not win him, you may taulke, and hope

butt, in loues pa∫sages ther is larg ∫cope

Si:

T'is true, and you haue ∫cope to chang, and chu∫e

to take, and dislike, like, and ∫oune refu∫e,

Cli:

My loue as firme is to him as is thine

Si:

yett mine did euer ri∫e, neuer decline

noe other mou'd in mee the flames of loue,

yett you dare hope, as much as I to moue

folly indeed is proud, and only Vaine

and word you his ∫eruante feeds to wt hope of gaine,

Cli:

I loue him most, Si: I loue him best can you

chaleng reward, and can nott ∫ay you'r true

Cli:

In this you wrong mee, faulce I haue nott bin

butt chang'd on cau∫e Si: well now you hope to win

this ∫ecound, yett, I like tho∫e lo∫e noe time

butt can you thinke yt you can this way clime

to your de∫ires, this showes you loue haue trid,

and that you can both chou∫e, and choi∫e deuide

butt take yor cour∫e, and win him if you can

and I'le pro∫eed in truth, as I began

Da:

Fy what a lyfe is heere about fond loue

neuer could itt in my hart thus much moue

this is the rea∫on men ar growne ∫oe coy

when they par∫eaue wee make their ∫miles our ioy

lett them alone, and they will ∫eeke, and ∫ue,

butt yeeld to them, they will wt ∫corne pour∫ue;

hold awhile of they'll kneele, nay follow you,

and Vowe, and ∫weare, yett all their othes vntrue;

lett them once ∫ee you coming; then they fly

butt strangly looke, and they'll for pitty cry,

and lett them cry ther is noe euill dunn

they gaine butt that wch you might els haue wunn,

Si:

is this your coun∫ell why butt not you ∫aid

your folly had your loues, and good betraid,

and that heerafter you would wi∫er bee

then to di∫daine ∫uch as haue left you free,

Da:

't'is true, that was the cour∫e I ment to take

butt this must you doe, your owne word ends to make

I haue my fortunes lost, yours doe begin

and to cro∫s tho∫e could bee noe greater ∫in

I know the world, and heare mee, this I' adui∫e

rather then to ∫oune wunn, bee too pre∫i∫e

Climena:

This will not win him, you may talk, and hope,

but, in love's passages there is large scope.

Simena:

'Tis true, and you have scope to change, and choose

to take, and dislike, like, and soon refuse.

Climena:

My love as firm is to him as is thine.

Simena:

Yet mine did ever rise, never decline,

no other moved in me the flames of love,

yet you dare hope, as much as I to move.

Folly indeed is proud, and only vain,

and you his servant feeds with hope of gain.

Climena:

I love him most.

Simena:

I love him best; can you

challenge reward, and cannot say you're true?

Climena:

In this you wrong me, false I have not been

but changed on cause.

Simena: Well, now you hope to win

this second. Yet, I like those, lose no time,

but can you think yet you can this way climb

to your desires? This shows you love have tried,

and that you can both choose, and choice divide.

But take your course, and win him if you can

and I'll proceed in truth, as I began.

Dalina:

Fie, what a life is here about fond love!

Never could it in my heart thus much move.

This is the reason men are grown so coy,

when they perceive we make their smiles our joy.

Let them alone, and they will seek, and sue,

but yield to them, they will with scorn pursue.

Hold awhile off, they'll kneel, nay follow you,

and vow, and swear, yet all their oaths untrue.

Let them once see you coming, then they fly,

but strangely look, and they'll for pity cry.

And let them cry, there is no evil done.

They gain but that which you might else have won.

Simena:

Is this your counsel? Why, but now you said

your folly had your loves, and good, betrayed,

and that hereafter you would wiser be

than to disdain such as have left you free.

Dalina:

'Tis true, that was the course I meant to take,

but this must you do, your own ends to make.

I have my fortunes lost, yours do begin,

and to cross those could be no greater sin.

I know the world, and hear me, this I advise:

rather than too soon won, be too precise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Si:

yett mine did euer ri∫e, neuer decline [ ,]

noe other mou'd in mee the flames of loue,

yett you dare hope, as much as I to moue

folly [ Folly] indeed is proud, and only Vaine

and word you his ∫eruante feeds wt hope of gaine,

Cli:

I loue him most, [ :] Si: I loue him best can you

chaleng reward, and can nott ∫ay you'r [ you're] true

Cli:

In this you wrong mee, faulce [ faulse] I haue nott bin

butt chang'd on cau∫e [ :] Si: well now you hope to win

this ∫ecound, yett I like tho∫e lo∫e noe time [ ,]

butt can you thinke yt [ that] you can this way clime

to your [ yor] de∫ires, this showes you loue haue trid, [ tride,]

and that you can both chou∫e, [ chu∫e,] and choi∫e [ choyce] deuide [ ,]

butt take yor [ your] cour∫e, and win him if you can

and I'le pro∫eed [ proceed] in truth, as I began [ ; /]

Da:

Fy what a lyfe is heere about fond loue

neuer could itt in my hart [ ,] thus much moue

this is the rea∫on men ar growne ∫oe coy

when they par∫eaue [ parceaue] wee make their [ theyr] ∫miles our [ owr] ioy

lett them alone, and they will ∫eeke, and ∫ue,

butt yeeld to them, they will [ they'll] wt ∫corne pour∫ue; [ pur∫ue]

hold awhile [ a while] of they'll kneele, nay [ and] follow you,

and Vowe, and ∫weare, yett all their [ theyr] othes vntrue; [ ,]

lett them once ∫ee you coming; [ coming] then they fly

butt strangly looke, and they'll for pitty cry,

and lett them cry ther is noe euill [ euile] dunn

they gaine butt that wch you might els haue wunn,

Si:

is [ Is] this your coun∫ell why butt now you ∫aid

your folly had your loues, and good betraid, [ betrayd,]

and that heerafter you would wi∫er bee

then to di∫daine ∫uch as haue left you free,

Da:

't'is [ 'Tis] true, that was the cour∫e I ment to take

butt this must you doe, your [ yor] owne good ends to make

I haue my fortunes lost, yours doe begin

and to cro∫s tho∫e could bee noe greater ∫in [ ,]

I know the world, and heare [ heere] mee, this I' adui∫e

rather then to ∫oune [ ∫oone] wunn, [ wun,] bee too pre∫i∫e [ preci∫e]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

nothing is lost by beeing carefull still,

nor nothing ∫oe ∫oune wun as louers ill,

heer Li∫sius comes, alas thee is loue shooke

hee's euen now learning loue wt out the booke

Li∫sius

Loue pardon mee I know I did ami∫s

when I thee ∫corn'd or thought thy blame my bli∫s

Ô pitty mee, alas I pitty craue

doe nott ∫ett trophies on my luckles graue,

though I, poore slaue, and ignorant, did ∫corne

thy ble∫ed name, lett nott my hart be torne

wth thus much torture, ô butt looke on mee

take mee a faithfull ∫eruant now to thee,

Cli:

Deere Li∫sius, my deere Li∫sius fly mee nott

lett nott both ∫corne, and ab∫ence bee my lott,

Li∫s:

'pray lett mee goe you know I can nott loue

doe nott thus farr my pa∫ience stiriue to moue;

cli:

Why cruell Li∫sius wilt thou neuer ment

butt still increa∫e thy frounes for my ∫ad end,

Li:

Climeana t'is enought that I haue ∫aide

bee gon, and leaue mee, is this for a maide

to follow, and to haunt mee thus, you blame

mee for di∫daine butt ∫ee nott your owne shame

fy, I doe blush for you, a woman woo,

the most vnfittest, shamfullst thing to doo

Cli:

Vnfitt, and shamefull, I indeed t'is true

∫ince ∫ute is made to hard relentles you

well I will leaue you, and restore the wrong

I ∫uffer for my louing you too long,

noe more shall my words trouble you nor I

er'e follow more if nott to ∫ee mee dy; ex:

Li∫s:

farewell you now doe right, this is ye

way

to win my wish, for when I all neglect

that ∫eek mee she must needs something respect

my loue the more, and what though she should ∫ay

I once denide her, yett my true felt paine

must needs from her ∫oft brest ∫ome fauor gaine

Da:

Li∫sius is taken, well ∫aid Cupid, now

you partly haue parform'd your taken Vow

of all our sheapheards I ne're thought that hee

would of thy foulish troupe a follower bee;

butt this itt is a godele∫s to dispi∫e,

and thwart a wayward boy who wants his eyes;

come lett's nott trouble him, hee is distrest

enough hee neede nott bee wt vs oprest,

Nothing is lost by being careful still,

nor nothing so soon won as lovers' ill.

Here Lissius comes; alas, he is love shook.

He's even now learning love without the book.

Enter Lissius

Lissius:

Love, pardon me, I know I did amiss,

when I thee scorned or thought thy blame my bliss.

O pity me, alas, I pity crave.

Do not set trophies on my luckless grave,

though I, poor slave, and ignorant, did scorn

thy blessed name, let not my heart be torn

with thus much torture. O but look on me,

take me a faithful servant now to thee.

Climena:

Dear Lissius, my dear Lissius, fly me not.

Let not both scorn and absence be my lot.

Lissius:

Pray let me go, you know I cannot love.

Do not thus far my patience strive to move.

Climena:

Why cruel Lissius, wilt thou never mend,

but still increase thy frowns for my sad end?

Lissius:

Climena, 'tis enough that I have said,

begone and leave me. Is this for a maid

to follow, and to haunt me thus? You blame

me for disdain, but see not your own shame.

Fie, I do blush for you! A woman woo,

the most unfittest, shamefull'st thing to do.

Climena:

Unfit, and shameful, I? Indeed 'tis true,

since suit is made too hard, relentless you.

Well, I will leave you, and restore the wrong

I suffer for my loving you too long.

No more shall my words trouble you, nor I

e'er follow more if not to see me die.

Exit Climena

Lissius:

Farewell, you now do right. This is the way

to win my wish, for when I all neglect

that seek me, she must needs something respect

my love the more; and what though she should say

I once denied her, yet my true felt pain

must needs from her soft breast some favour gain.

Dalina:

Lissius is taken, well said. Cupid, now

you partly have performed your taken vow;

of all our shepherds, I ne'er thought that he

would of thy foolish troop a follower be.

But this it is a goddess to despise,

and thwart a wayward boy who wants his eyes.

Come, let's not trouble him, he is distressed

enough, he need not be with us oppressed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blame: this exchange between Lissius and Climeana perhaps owes something to the tangled desires of Shakespeare's As You Like It.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eyes: ie Cupid

nothing is lost by beeing carefull still,

nor nothing ∫oe ∫oune [ ∫oone ] wun as louers ill,

heer [ heere] Li∫sius comes, alas thee [ he] is loue shooke

hee's euen now learning loue wt out the booke [ ;]

Li∫sius

Loue pardon mee [ ,] I know I did ami∫s

when I thee ∫corn'd or thought thy blame my bli∫s [ blis,]

Ô [ O] pitty mee, alas I pitty craue

doe nott ∫ett trophies [ Trophes] on my luckles graue,

though I, [ I] poore slaue, and ignorant, [ ignorant] did ∫corne

thy ble∫ed name, lett nott my hart be torne

wth thus much torture, ô [ O] butt looke on mee [ ,]

take mee a faithfull ∫eruant now to [ vnto] thee,

Cli:

Deere [ Deer] Li∫sius, my deere Li∫sius fly mee nott

lett nott both ∫corne, and ab∫ence bee my lott,

Li∫s:

'pray [ Pray] lett mee goe [ ,] you know I can nott loue

doe nott thus farr my pa∫ience [ patience] stiriue [ striue] to moue;

Cli:

Why cruell Li∫sius wilt thou neuer mend

butt still increa∫e thy frounes [ frowns] for my ∫ad end, [ ?]

Li:

Climeana t'is enought that I haue ∫aide [ ∫ayd]

bee [ be] gon, and leaue mee, [ ;] is [ Is] this for a maide [ mayd]

to follow, and to haunt mee thus, [ ?] you blame*

mee for di∫daine butt ∫ee nott your [ yor] owne shame

fy, I doe blush for you, a woman woo, [ ?]

the most vnfittest, [ vnfittingst] shamfullst [ shamfull'st] thing to doo [ doe]

Cli:

Vnfitt, and shamefull, [ shamfull] I indeed t'is true

∫ince ∫ute is made to hard relentles you [ ,]

well I will leaue you, and restore the wrong [ wronge]

I ∫uffer for my louing you too [ ∫oe] long,

noe more shall my words trouble you [ ,] nor I

er'e [ ere] follow more if nott to ∫ee mee dy; [ dye,] ex:

Li∫s: [ Li:]

farewell [ Farewell] you now doe right, this is ye [ the] way

to win my wish, for when I all neglect

that ∫eek [ ∫eeke] mee she must needs something [ something] respect

my loue the more, and what though she should [ showld] ∫ay

I once denide [ deny'd] her, yett my true felt paine

must needs from her ∫oft brest ∫ome fauor gaine [ ;]

Da:

Li∫sius is taken, well ∫aid [ ∫ayd,] Cupid, now

you partly haue parform'd [ perform'd] your taken Vow

of all our sheapheards [ shepherds] I ne're [ nere] thought that [ yt] hee

would [ wowld] of thy foulish [ foolish] troupe [ troope] a follower bee;

butt this itt is a godele∫s [ Godde∫s] to dispi∫e,

and thwart a wayward boy who [ that] wants his eyes;* [ ,]

come lett's nott trouble him, hee is distrest

enough hee neede nott bee wt vs oprest,

Si:

Ile [ I'le] stay, and aske him who t'is hee doth loue

Da:

do nott a pen∫iue [ pensiue] hart to pa∫sion moue

Si:

to [ To] pa∫sion [ ?] would I could his pa∫sion find

to an∫were my distre∫sd, [ de∫ire,] and griued mind [ ,]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Si:

Ile stay, and aske him who t'is hee doth loue

Da:

do nott a pen∫iue hart to pa∫sion moue

Si:

to pa∫sion would I could his pa∫sion find

to an∫were my distre∫sd, and griued mind

Da:

Stay then, and try him, and yor fortune try

itt may bee hee loues you, come letts goe by

Li∫s:

Ô Sweet ∫imena looke butt on my paine

I grieue, and cur∫e my ∫elf for my di∫daine

now butt haue pitty loue doth make me ∫erue,

and for yor wrong, and you I will re∫erue

my lyfe to pay, your loue butt to de∫erue,

and for your ∫ake I doe my lyfe pre∫erue,

Si

pre∫erue itt nott for mee I ∫eeke nott now,

nor can I creditt this, nor any Vow

wch you shall make, I was to long dispi∫'d

to bee dea∫eau'd, noe, I will bee aduis'd

by my owne rea∫on, loue shall noe more blind

mee, nor make mee beeleeue more then I find,

Li:

beleeue butt that, and I shall haue the end

of all my paine, and wishes, I pretend

a Vertuous loue, then grant mee my de∫ire

who now doe wast in true, and faithfull fire,

Si:

how can I this beeleeue; Li: my faith shall tell

that in true loue I will all els excell,

butt then will you loue mee as I doe you

Si:

I promi∫e may, for you can nott bee true,

Li:

then you will promi∫e breake, Si: nott if I find

that as your words are, ∫oe you'll make yor mind,

Li:

lett mee nor speach, nor mind haue, when that I

in this or any els doe faul∫sefy

my faith, and loue to you; Si: then bee att rest

and of my true affection bee po∫sest

Li:

Soe deere Simeana bee of mee, and mine

now doe my hopes, and ioys together shine,

Si:

nor lett the least cloud ri∫e to dim this light

wch loue makes to apeere wt true delight;/ ex

Simena:

I'll stay, and ask him who 'tis he doth love.

Dalina:

Do not a pensive heart to passion move.

Simena:

To passion? Would I could his passion find

to answer my distressed and grieved mind.

Dalina:

Stay then, and try him, and your fortune try;

it may be he loves you. Come let's go by.

Lissius:

O sweet Simena, look but on my pain,

I grieve, and curse myself for my disdain;

now but have pity, love doth make me serve,

and for your wrong, and you I will reserve

my life to pay, your love but to deserve,

and for your sake I do my life preserve.

Simena:

Preserve it not for me, I seek not now,

nor can I credit this, nor any vow

which you shall make. I was too long despised

to be deceived. No, I will be advised

by my own reason; love shall no more blind

me, nor make me believe more than I find.

Lissius:

Believe but that, and I shall have the end

of all my pain, and wishes. I pretend

a virtuous love, then grant me my desire,

who now do waste in true, and faithful fire

Simena:

How can I this believe?

Lissius:

My faith shall tell

that in true love I will all else excel,

but then will you love me as I do you?

Simena:

I promise may, for you cannot be true.

Lissius:

Then you will promise break.

Simena: Not if I find

that as your words are, so you'll make your mind.

Lissius:

Let me nor speech, nor mind have, when that I

in this or any else do falsify

my faith, and love to you.

Simena: Then be at rest

and of my true affection be possessed.

Lissius:

So dear Simena, bee of me, and mine.

Now do my hopes, and joys together shine.

Simena:

Nor let the least cloud rise to dim this light,

which love makes to appear with true delight.

Exeunt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Da:

Stay then, and try him, and yor fortune try

itt may bee hee loues you, come [ com] letts goe by [ ex:]

Li∫s: [ Li∫sius.]

Ô [ O] Sweet ∫imena looke butt on my paine

I grieue, and cur∫e my ∫elf for my di∫daine [ ,]

now butt haue pitty [ ,] loue doth make me ∫erue,

and for yor [ your] wrong, and you I will re∫erue

my lyfe to pay, your loue butt to de∫erue,

and for your ∫ake I doe my lyfe pre∫erue, [ ;]

Si

pre∫erue [ Preserue] itt nott for mee [ ,] I ∫eeke nott now, [ nowe]

nor can I creditt this, nor any Vow [ Vowe]

wch you shall make, I was to long dispi∫'d

to bee dea∫eau'd, [ deceau'd] noe, I will bee [ wilbe] aduis'd

by my owne rea∫on, [ by reason now,] loue shall noe more blind

mee, nor make mee beeleeue more then I find,

Li:

beleeue [ Beeleeue] butt that, and I shall haue the end

of all my paine, and wishes, I pretend

a Vertuous loue, then grant mee my de∫ire

who now doe wast in true, and faithfull fire, [ /]

Si:

how [ How] can I this beeleeue; [ :] Li: my faith shall tell

that in true loue I will all els excell,

butt then will you loue mee as I doe you [ ?]

Si: [ Simeana:]

I promi∫e may, for you can nott bee true,

Li:

then you will promi∫e breake, Si: nott if I find

that as your words are, [ ar,] ∫oe you'll make yor mind,

Li:

lett [ Lett] mee nor speach, nor mind haue, when that I

in this or any els doe faul∫sefy [ faulsify]

my faith, and loue to you; Si: then bee att rest [ ,]

and of my true affection bee po∫sest [ ,]

Li:

Soe deere Simeana [ Simena] bee of mee, and mine [ ,]

now doe my hopes, and ioys together shine,

Si:

nor [ Nor] lett the least cloud [ clowd] ri∫e to dim [ dimm] this light

wch loue makes to apeere wt [ wth] true delight;/ ex [ / flourish]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

word

Venus;/

Venus:

Cupid: this interlude between Venus and Cupid underlines the way that the penshurst version of the play lays greater stress on the mnasque-like interventiuon of supernatural beings in human affairs.

The Forth;/

Musella

Venus;/

[ Venus, and Cupid;

Cu:

Is nott this pretty? who doth free remaine

of all this flock that waits nott in owr traine?

will you haue yett more ∫orrow? yett more woe?

shall I an other bitter arrow throwe?

speak if you will, my hand now knows the way

to make all harts your ∫acred power obay;

Venus

'T'is pretty, butt 't'is nott enough, ∫ome are

to slightly wounded, they had greater share

in ∫corning vs. Li∫sius to ∫oone is blest,

and wt too little paine hath gott his rest

∫carce had hee learn'd to ∫igh beefor hee gaind,

nor shed a teare, 'ere hee his hopes obtain'd,

this ea∫y wining breeds vs more neglect

wtout much paine, few doe lous ioys respect,

then are they ∫weetest purcha∫'d wth felt griefe

to floods of woe ∫weet looks giues full reliefe

a world of ∫orrow is ea∫d wt one ∫mile,

and hart wounds cure'd when kind words rule, the while

that foregon wailings in forgotten thoughts

shall wasted ly di∫daind, once deerly bought

one gentle speach more heals a bleeding wound

then baulins of plea∫ure, if from other ground,

strike then too fauor him, and lett him gaine

his loue, and blis by Loues ∫weet plea∫ing paine,

Cu:

That shalbee dun, nor had hee this delight

beestow'd butt for his greater harme, and spite,

you shall beefor this Act bee ended ∫ee

hee doth ∫ufficiently taste mi∫erie

t'is farr more griefe from ioye to bee downe throwne

then ioy to bee aduanc'd to plea∫urs throwne,

Venus:

Lett mee ∫ee that, and I contented ame:

∫uch gratious fauor, wowld butt gett thy shame,

Cu:

Hee and others yett shall taste

∫uch distre∫s as shall lay waste

all ther hopes, theyr ioys, and liues,

by ∫uch lo∫s owr glory thriues;

fear nott then all harts must yeeld

when owr forces come to field; {S with diagonal line through it}

{flourish}

Page of Huntington manuscript.

The 4 Acte;

Mu∫ella;

This is the place Siluesta 'pointed mee

to meete my ioy, my ∫ole felicitie

and heere Phili∫ses is, (ay mee) this showes

the wounds by loue giuen ar noe childish blowes

Phi:

You ble∫sed woods into who∫e ∫ecrett guard

I Venter dare my inward wounding ∫mart

and to you dare impart the cro∫ses hard

wch harbour in my loue destroyed hart

to you, and butt to you I durst dis∫clo∫e

the∫e flames, thes paines, thes griefs wch I do find

for your true harts ∫oe constant are to tho∫e

who trust in you as you'll nott chang your mind

Noe Echo shrill shall yor deere ∫ecretts utter,

or wrong yor ∫ilence wth a blabing tongue

nor will your springs against your priuate mutter

or thinke that coun∫ell keeping is a wrong;

then ∫ince woods, springs, echo∫es, and all are true,

my long felt woes I'le tell, shew, write in you;

Alas Mu∫ella, cruell sheapherde∫s

Who takes no pitty on mee in distre∫s

for all my pa∫sions, plaints, and all my woes

I am ∫oe farr from gaine, as outward showes

I neuer had could feede least hope to spring

or any while least comfort to mee bring;

yett pardon mee deere mrs of my ∫oule,

I doe recall my words, my tongue controle,

for wronging thee, accu∫e my poore steru'd hart

wch wither'd is wt loues all killing ∫mart,

∫ince truly I must ∫ay I can nott blame

thee, nor condemne thee wth a ∫corners name,

noe, noe (alas) my paines thou dost nott know

nor dare I wrech to thee my torments show,

why did I wrong thee then, who all must ∫erue,

and happy hee by thee thought to de∫erue,

Who heauen hath fram'd to make vs heere beelow

de∫erne they striue all worth in thee to show,

and doth the∫e Vallies, and the∫e meads di∫grace

when thou art pre∫ent wth excelling grace

as now; who att this time doth show more bright

then faire Aurora when she lends best light;

Ô that I might butt now haue hart to speake,

and ∫ay I loue, though after hart did breake

Mu:

I faine would comfort him, and yett I know

word nott if from mee 't' will comfort bee or noe

∫ince cau∫les iealo∫ie hath ∫oe po∫se∫t

his hart, as noe beeleefe of mee can rest;

yett why stay I, I came to giue reliefe

should I then doubt, no I may ea∫e his griefe,

and help will ∫eeke, none should ones good neglect

much more his blis who for mee ioys reiect

ACT FOUR

Enter Musella

Musella:

This is the place Silvesta 'ppointed me

to meet my joy, my sole felicity

and here Philisses is, (ay me), this shows

the wounds by love given are no childish blows.

Enter Philisses

Philisses:

You blessed woods into whose secret guard

I venture dare my inward wounding smart,

and to you dare impart the crosses hard

which harbour in my love-destroyed heart,

to you, and but to you, I durst disclose

these flames, these pains, these griefs which I do find.

For your true hearts so constant are to those

who trust in you as you'll not change your mind;

no echo shrill shall your dear secrets utter,

or wrong your silence with a blabbing tongue.

Nor will your springs against your private mutter

or think that counsel keeping is a wrong.

Then since woods, springs, echoes, and all are true,

my long felt woes I'll tell, show, write in you.

Alas Musella, cruel shepherdess,

who takes no pity on me in distress.

For all my passions, plaints, and all my woes,

I am so far from gain, as outward shows

I never had could feed least hope to spring

or any while least comfort to mee bring;

yet pardon me dear mistress of my soul,

I do recall my words, my tongue control,

for wronging thee, accuse my poor starved heart

which withered is with love's all killing smart.

Since, truly, I must say I cannot blame

thee, nor condemn thee with a scorner's name.

No, no (alas), my pains thou dost not know

nor dare I, wretch, to thee my torments show:

why did I wrong thee then, who all must serve,

and happy he by thee thought to deserve,

who heaven hath framed to make us here below

discern they strive all worth in thee to show, and doth these valleys, and these meads disgrace

when thou art present with excelling grace

as now; who at this time doth show more bright

than fair Aurora when she lends best light.

O that I might but now have heart to speak,

and say I love, though after heart did break.

Musella:

I fain would comfort him, and yet I know

not if from me 'twill comfort be or no,

since causeless jealousy hath so possessed

his heart, as no belief of me can rest.

Yet why stay I? I came to give relief.

Should I then doubt? No, I may ease his grief,

and help will seek. None should one's good neglect

much more his bliss who for me joys reject.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

word: nott crossed out but the rest is indecipherable.

The 4 [ Forth] Acte;

Mu∫ella;

This is the place Siluesta 'pointed mee

to meete my ioy, [ ioye,] my ∫ole felicitie

and heere Phili∫ses is, (ay mee) [ ay mee] this showes

the wounds by loue giuen ar noe [ no] childish blowes [ ,]

Phi:

You ble∫sed woods into who∫e ∫ecrett guard

I Venter dare my inward wounding ∫mart [ ,]

and to you dare impart the cro∫ses hard

wch harbour in my loue destroyed [ distroyed] hart

to you, and butt to you I durst dis∫clo∫e

the∫e [ thes] flames, thes paines, thes griefs wch I do find

for your true harts ∫oe [ so] constant are to tho∫e

who trust in you as you'll nott chang your [ yor] mind

Noe [ No] Echo shrill shall yor deere ∫ecretts utter,

or wrong yor [ your] ∫ilence wth a blabing [ blabbing] tongue

nor will your springs against your priuate [ yor priuatt] mutter

or thinke that coun∫ell keeping is a wrong; [ .]

then [ Then] ∫ince woods, springs, echo∫es, [ Echoes,] and all are true,

my long felt woes [ long hid loue] I'le tell, shew, write in you;

Alas Mu∫ella, cruell sheapherde∫s [ sheapherdes,]

who takes no pitty on mee in distre∫s

for all my pa∫sions, plaints, and all my woes

I am ∫oe farr from gaine, as outward showes

I neuer had could feede [ feed] least hope to spring

or any while least comfort to mee bring;

yett pardon mee deere mrs [ Mrs] of my ∫oule,

I doe recall my words, my tongue controle,

for wronging thee, accu∫e my poore steru'd hart

wch wither'd [ witherd] is wt loues all killing ∫mart,

∫ince truly I must ∫ay I can nott blame

thee, nor condemne [ accuse] thee wth [ wt] a ∫corners name,

noe, [ Noe,] noe (alas) my paines thou dost nott know

nor dare I wrech to thee my torments [ my torments to thee] show,

why [ Why] did I wrong thee then, [ ?] who all must ∫erue,

and happy hee by thee thought to de∫erue,

Who heauen [ heau'n] hath fram'd to make vs heere beelow [ bolow]

de∫erne they striue all worth in thee to show,

and doth the∫e Vallies, and the∫e meads di∫grace

when thou art pre∫ent wth [ wt] excelling grace

as now; [ ,] who att this time doth show more bright

then faire Aurora [ ,] when she lends best light;

Ô [ O] that I might butt now haue hart to speake,

and ∫ay I loue, though after hart did breake [ ,]

Mu:

I faine would [ wowld] comfort him, and yett I [ doe nott] know

word* nott [ whether from mee] if from mee 't' will comfort bee or noe

∫ince cau∫les iealo∫ie hath ∫oe po∫se∫t

his hart, as noe beeleefe of mee can rest;

yett [ butt] why stay I, [ ?] I came to giue reliefe

should I then doubt, [ ?] no I may ea∫e his griefe,

and help will ∫eeke, none should ones good neglect

much more his blis who for mee ioys reiect [ ,]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

How now Phili∫ses, why do you thus grieue

speake, is ther non that can your paines relieue

Phi:

Yes faire Mu∫ella, butt ∫uch is my state

reliefe must come from her who can butt hate;

What hope can I wrech haue least good to moue

wher ∫corne doth grow for mee, for others loue;

Mu:

butt are you ∫ure she doth your loue di∫daine,

itt may bee for your loue she feels like paine;

Phi:

like paine for mee, I would nott craue ∫oe much,

I wish noe more butt that loue might her tuch,

and that she might de∫erne by loue to know

that kind reguard is fitt for her to show;

Mu:

∫ure this she knowes; Phi: proue itt, and I may liue

Mu:

tell mee who 't'is you loue, and I will giue

my word I'le win her if she may bee wunn

Phi:

ay^ that doubt in mee made mee first runn

into this labourinth of woe, and care

wch makes mee thus to wed my owne dispaire

Mu:

butt haue you made itt knowne to her you loue

that for her ∫corne you do the∫e torments proue

Phi:

Yes now I haue, and yett to ea∫e ∫ome paine

I'le plainlier speake, though my owne end I gaine,

and ∫oe to end itt were to mee a bli∫s,

then know for your deere ∫ake my ∫orrow is,

itt may bee you will hate mee, yett I haue

by this ∫ome ea∫e though wt itt come my graue,

yett deere Mu∫ella ∫ince for you I pine,

and ∫uffer welcom paine, lett fauor shine

thus far, that though my loue you doe neglect

yett ∫orry bee I died; wt this respect

I shalbee ∫ati∫fied, and ∫oe content

as I shall deeme my lyfe, ∫oe lost, well spent,

Mu:

Sory (alas Phili∫ses) can itt bee

butt I should grieue, and mourne, nay dy for thee,

yett tell mee, why did you thus hide your loue,

and ∫uffer wrong con∫eits thus much to moue

now 't'is allmost to late your wish to gaine

yett you shall pitty, word for your loue obtaine

Phi:

Pitty, when helples t'is, is endle∫s giuen

am I to this vnhapy bondage driu'n

yett truly pitty, and t'will bee ∫ome ea∫e

vnto my griefe though all els doe displea∫e,

butt doe nott yett vnles you can affect

for forced pitty's wur∫e then is neglect,

and to bee pitty'd butt for pitty ∫ake

and

How now Philisses, why do you thus grieve?

Speak, is there none that can your pains relieve?

Philisses:

Yes fair Musella, but such is my state,

relief must come from her who can but hate.

What hope can I, wretch, have least good to move

where scorn doth grow for me, for others love?

Musella:

But are you sure she doth your love disdain?

It may be for your love she feels like pain.

Philisses:

Like pain for me! I would not crave so much.

I wish no more but that love might her touch,

and that she might discern by love to know

that kind regard is fit for her to show.

Musella:

Sure this she knows.

Philisses:

Prove it, and I may live.

Musella:

Tell me who 'tis you love, and I will give

my word I'll win her if she may be won.

Philisses:

Ay that doubt in me made me first run

into this labyrinth of woe, and care,

which makes me thus to wed my own despair.

Musella:

But have you made it known to her you love

that for her scorn you do these torments prove?

Philisses:

Yes now I have, and yet to ease some pain,

I'll plainlier speak, though my own end I gain,

and so to end it were to me a bliss.

Then know for your dear sake my sorrow is,

it may be you will hate me, yet I have

by this some ease, though with it come my grave.

Yet dear Musella, since for you I pine,

and suffer welcome pain, let favour shine

thus far, that though my love you do neglect,

yet sorry be I died; with this respect

I shall be satisfied, and so content

as I shall deem my life, so lost, well spent.

Musella:

Sorry (alas Philisses) can it be

but I should grieve, and mourn, nay die for thee?

Yet tell me, why did you thus hide your love?

And suffer wrong conceits thus much to move?

Now 'tis almost too late your wish to gain,

yet you shall pity for your love obtain.

Philisses:

Pity, when helpless 'tis, is endless given,

am I to this unhappy bondage driv'n?

Yet truly pity, and 'twill be some ease

unto my grief though all else do displease.

But do not yet, unless you can affect,

for forced pity's worse than is neglect,

and to be pitied but for pity sake

How now Phili∫ses, why do you thus grieue

speake, is ther non that can your paines relieue

Phi:

Yes faire Mu∫ella, butt ∫uch is my state

reliefe must come from her who can butt hate; [ ,]

What hope can I wrech haue least good to moue

wher ∫corne doth grow [ growe] for mee, for others loue;

Mu:

butt [ Butt] are you ∫ure she doth your loue di∫daine,

itt may bee for your loue she feels like paine; [ .]

Phi:

like [ Like] paine for mee, [ ?] I would nott craue ∫oe much,

I wish noe more butt that loue might her tuch,

and that she might de∫erne by loue to know

that kind reguard [ respect] is fitt for her to show;

Mu:

∫ure this she knowes; Phi: proue itt, and I may liue [ ,]

Mu:

tell [ Tell] mee who 't'is [ 'tis] you loue, and I will giue

my word I'le win her if she may bee wunn [ wun]

Phi:

ay^ [ Ay] mee that doubt in mee made mee first runn [ run]

into this labourinth of woe, and care

wch makes mee thus to wed my [ mine] owne dispaire [ ;]

Mu:

butt [ Butt] haue you made itt knowne to her you loue

that for her ∫corne you do the∫e [ thes] torments proue [ ?]

Phi:

Yes now I haue, and yett to ea∫e ∫ome paine

I'le plainlier speake, though my owne end I gaine,

and ∫oe to end [ ,] itt were to mee a bli∫s,

then know for your deere ∫ake my ∫orrow is,

itt may bee you will hate mee, yett I haue

by this ∫ome ea∫e though wt itt come my graue,

yett deere Mu∫ella ∫ince for you I pine,

and ∫uffer welcom paine, [ wellcome death,] lett fauor shine

thus far, [ farr,] that though my loue you doe neglect

yett ∫orry bee I died; [ dide;] wt [ wth] this respect

I shalbee ∫ati∫fied, and ∫oe content

as I shall deeme my lyfe, [ lyfe] ∫oe lost, [ lost] well spent,

Mu:

Sory (alas Phili∫ses) [ alas Philisses] can itt bee

butt I should [ showld] grieue, and mourne, nay dy for thee, [ ?]

yett tell mee, why did you thus hide your loue, [ ?]

and ∫uffer wrong con∫eits thus much to moue [ ?]

now 't'is [ t'is] allmost to late your wish to gaine

yett you shall pitty, and my for your loue obtaine

Phi:

Pitty, when helples t'is, is endle∫s [ endles] giuen

am I to this vnhapy bondage driu'n [ ?]

yett truly pitty, and t'will bee ∫ome ea∫e

vnto my griefe though all [ things els] els doe displea∫e,

butt doe nott yett vnles you can affect

for forced pitty's wur∫e [ ,] then is neglect,

and to bee pitty'd butt for pitty ∫ake

and nott for loue do neuer pitty take

Mu:

Well then I loue you, and ∫oe euer must

though time, or Fortune should bee still vniust;

for wee may loue, and both may constant proue

butt nott inioy vnle∫s [ vnles] ordaind [ ordain'd] aboue

Phi

Dost thou loue mee, [ ?] o [ O] deere Mu∫ella ∫ay

and ∫ay itt still to kill my late di∫may

Mu:

More then my ∫elf, or loue my ∫elf for thee

the better much; [ ,] butt wilt thou loue like mee?

Phi:

My only lyfe, heer doe I Vow to dy

when I proue faulce, [ faulse,] or show inconstancy,[ vnconstancie.]

Mu:

All true content may this to both procure [ ,]

P:

and when I breake lett mee [ may I] all shame indure

Page of Huntington manuscript.

and nott for loue do neuer pitty take

Mu:

Well then I loue you, and ∫oe euer must

thought time, or Fortune should bee still vniust;

for wee may loue, and both may constant proue

butt nott inioy vnle∫s ordaind aboue

Phi

Dost thou loue mee, o deere Mu∫ella ∫ay

and ∫ay itt still to kill my late di∫may

Mu:

More then my ∫elf, or loue my ∫elf for thee

the better much; butt wilt thou loue like mee?

Phi:

My only lyfe, heer doe I Vow to dy

when I proue faulce, or show inconstancy,

Mu:

All true content may this to both procure

P:

and when I breake lett mee all shame indure

Mu:

nor doubt you mee nor my true hart mistrust,

for dy I will befor I proue vniust;

butt heere comes Rustick who∫e incombred braine

wt loue, and iealou∫ie must our lo∫s gaine

for ∫ince hee hops, nay ∫ays that I am his

I can nott ab∫ent bee butt hee'l mee mi∫s

butt when that is, lett day no longer shine,

or I haue lyfe, if liue nott truly thine

butt now least that our loue should be found out

lett's ∫eeke all meanes to keepe him from this doubt,

and lett non know itt butt your ∫ister deere

who∫e company I keepe, ∫oe hold all cleere;

the lett him wach, and keepe what hee can gett,

his plotts must want ther force our ioys to lett;

I'le step awhile a∫ide; till you doe meet

this wellcom man, who∫e ab∫ence were more ∫weet

for though that hee pour thing can litle find

yett I shall blush wt knowing my owne mind,

fear, and de∫ire still to keepe itt hid

word will blushing show itt when t'is most forbid,

Phi:

Non can haue pouer against a pouerfull loue

nor keep the blood butt in the cheeks t'will moue

butt nott for feare, or care itt ther doth show

butt kinde de∫ire makes you blushing know

that ioy takes place, and in your face doth chime

wt leaping hart, like lambkins in the prime;

butt ∫weet Mu∫ella ∫ince you will away

take now my hart and lett yours in mee stay, Mu: ex:

could I expre∫s the ioy I now con∫eaue

I were vnworthy ∫oe much to receaue

butt ∫oe much am I thine, as lyfe, and ioy

are in thy hands to nur∫e, or to destroy:

how now Rustick, whether away ∫oe fast?

and not for love do never pity take.

Musella:

Well then, I love you, and so ever must,

though time, or Fortune should be still unjust.

For we may love, and both may constant prove,

but not enjoy, unless ordained above.

Philisses:

Dost thou love me? O dear Musella say,

and say it still to kill my late dismay.

Musella:

More than myself, or love myself for thee,

the better much; but wilt thou love like me?

Philisses:

My only life, here do I vow to die

when I prove false, or show inconstancy.

Musella:

All true content may this to both procure.

Philisses:

And when I break, let me all shame endure.

Musella:

Nor doubt you me, nor my true heart mistrust,

for die I will before I prove unjust.

But here comes Rustick, whose encumbered brain

with love, and jealousy must our loss gain,

for since he hopes, nay says that I am his,

I cannot absent be, but he'll me miss.

But when that is, let day no longer shine

or I have life, if live not truly thine.

But now lest that our love should be found out,

let's seek all means to keep him from this doubt,

and let none know it but your sister dear,

whose company I keep, so hold all clear.

Then let him watch, and keep what he can get,

his plots must want their force our joys to let.

I'll step awhile aside till you do meet

this welcome man, whose absence were more sweet.

For though that he, poor thing, can little find,

yet I shall blush with knowing my own mind.

Fear, and desire, still to keep it hid

will blushing show it when 'tis most forbid.

Philisses:

None can have power against a powerful love,

nor keep the blood but in the cheeks 'twill move.

But not for fear, or care it there doth show,

but kind desire makes you blushing know

that joy takes place, and in your face doth chime

with leaping heart, like lambkins in the prime.

But sweet Musella, since you will away,

take now my heart and let yours in me stay.

Exit Musella

Could I express the joy I now conceive,

I were unworthy so much to receive.

But so much am I thine, as life, and joy

are in thy hands to nurse, or to destroy.

How now Rustick, whether away so fast?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lambkins: very young lambs, emphasises again the pastoral setting, though on the whole Wroth's 'shepherds' are the aristocratic kind found in pastoral literature rather than in actual pastures, as the contrast with Rustic underlines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mu:

nor [ Nor] doubt you mee [ ,] nor my true hart mistrust,

for dy I will befor I proue vniust;

butt heere [ heer] comes Rustick who∫e incombred [ encomber'd] braine

wt loue, and iealou∫ie must our [ owr] lo∫s gaine

for ∫ince hee hops, [ hopes,] nay ∫ays that I am his

I can nott ab∫ent bee butt hee'l [ hee'le] mee mi∫s

butt when that is, lett day no [ noe] longer shine,

or I haue lyfe, if liue nott truly thine [ .]

butt now least that our [ owr] loue should [ showld] be found out

lett's ∫eeke all meanes [ means] to keepe him from this doubt,

and lett non know itt butt your ∫ister deere [ ,]

who∫e company I keepe, ∫oe hold all cleere; [ ,]

then [ Then] lett him wach, and keepe what hee can [ hath] gett,

his plotts must want ther force our [ owr] ioys to lett;

I'le step awhile a∫ide; till you doe meet [ meete]

this wellcom [ welcome] man, who∫e ab∫ence were more ∫weet [ ,]

for though that hee pour thing [ (poore thing] can litle find

yett I shall blush wt knowing my owne mind,

fear, [ feare,] and de∫ire still to keepe [ conceale] itt hid

wt will blushing show itt when t'is most forbid, [ .]

Phi:

Non can haue pouer [ powre] against a pouerfull loue [ ,]

nor keep [ keepe] the blood butt in the cheeks t'will moue [ ,]

butt nott for feare, or care itt ther doth show

butt kinde [ kind] de∫ire makes you blushing know

that ioy [ ioye] takes place, and in your face doth clime

wt leaping hart, like lambkins* [ lamkins] in the prime;

butt ∫weet Mu∫ella ∫ince you will away

take now my hart and lett yours in mee stay, [ /] Mu: ex:

could [ Could] I expre∫s the ioy [ ioye] I now con∫eaue

I were vnworthy ∫oe much [ such blis] to receaue

butt ∫oe much am I thine, as lyfe, and ioy

are [ ar] in thy hands to nur∫e, or to destroy: [ distroy:]

how [ How] now Rustick, whether away ∫oe fast?

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Rus:

To ∫eeke Mu∫ella; phi: now that labour's past

∫ee wher she comes: Mu: Rustick wher were you

I ∫ought butt could nott find: you Ru: word is that true

faith I was butt the truth to you to tell

marking ∫om kattle, and asleepe I fell

Mu:

and I was ∫eeking of a long lost lamb

wch now I found eu'n as along you came

Ru:

I'me glad you found itt; Mu: truly ∫oe am I

Ru:

now lett vs goe to finde our company

Phi:

∫ee wher ∫ome bee, Mu: itt ∫eemes to ∫oune, alas

that loue di∫pi∫'d should com to ∫uch a pas

Li:
:Simena:

Loues beginning like the spring

giues delight in ∫weetnes flowing

euer plea∫ant flourishing

pride in her, braue coulers showing

Butt loue ending is att last

like the stormes of winters blast

Mu:

Li∫sius mee thinks you ar growne ∫ad of late,

and priuately wt your owne thoughts debate

I hope you ar nott fal'ne in loue, that boy

can nott I trust your ∫ettled hart inioy

Li:

'T'is well; you may bee merry att my fall

reioi∫e, nay doo, for I can lo∫e butt all;

Simena:

and ∫oe to much; ex: Mu: ∫ure ∫ome strang error is

Phi:

learne you itt out, Ru: wee'll leaue you, and bring bliss;

Mu:

Come Li∫sius tell mee whence pro∫eeds this griefe

di∫couer itt, and you may find reliefe

Li:

Now I'le goe ∫eeke Phili∫ses, hee I'me ∫ure

will comfort mee who doth the like indure;

yett faire Mu∫ella do thus much for mee

as tell ∫imena she hath murder'd mee,

and gaine butt this that she my end will ble∫s

wth ∫ome (though ∫malest griefe) for my distre∫s,

and that she will butt grace my haples tombe

as to beehold mee dead by her hard dombe;

this is a ∫male request, and 't'is my last,

who to obay, to my ∫ad end will haste

Mu:

Nay Li∫ius heere mee, tell mee ere word you goe

what ∫odaine matter moues in you this woe

Li:

Alas t'is loue of one I did di∫daine,

and now I ∫eeke, the like neglect I gaine

Rustick:

To seek Musella.

Philisses:

Now that labour's past.

See where she comes.

Enter Musella

Musella:

Rustick, where were you?

I sought but could not find you.

Rustick:

Is that true?

Faith, I was but, the truth to you to tell,

marking some cattle, and asleep I fell.

Musella:

And I was seeking of a long lost lamb,

which now I found ev'n as along you came.

Rustic:

I'm glad you found it.

Musella:

Truly so am I.

Rustic:

Now let us go to find our company.

Philisses:

See where some be.

Musella: It seems too soon, alas,

that love despised should come to such a pass.

Lissius [and] Simena:

Love's beginning, like the Spring,

gives delight in sweetness flowing.

Ever pleasant flourishing

pride in her, brave colours showing.

But love ending is at last

like the storms of winter's blast.

Musella:

Lissius, methinks you are grown sad of late,

and privately with your own thoughts debate.

I hope you are not fallen in love; that boy

cannot, I trust, your settled heart enjoy.

Lissius:

'Tis well, you may be merry at my fall;

rejoice, nay do, for I can lose but all.

Simena:

And so too much.

Exit Simena

Musella: Sure some strange error is.

Philisses:

Learn you it out.

Rustick:

We'll leave you, and bring bliss.

Musella:

Come Lissius, tell me whence proceeds this grief?

Discover it, and you may find relief.

Lissius:

Now I'll go seek Philisses; he I'm sure

will comfort me who doth the like endure.

Yet fair Musella do thus much for me

as tell Simena she hath murdered me,

and gain but this, that she my end will bless

with some (though smallest) grief for my distress,

and that she will but grace my hapless tomb

as to behold me dead by her hard doom.

This is a small request, and 'tis my last,

who to obey, to my sad end will haste.

Musella:

Nay Lissius, hear me; tell me ere you go

what sudden matter moves in you this woe.

Lissius:

Alas 'tis love of one I did disdain,

and now I seek, the like neglect I gain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

that boy: Cupid.

Rus: [ Ru:]

To ∫eeke Mu∫ella; phi: [ Phi:] now that labour's past

∫ee wher she comes: [ com's:] Mu: Rustick wher were you [ ?]

I ∫ought [ ,] butt could [ cowld] nott find: you [ :] Ru: and is that [ yt] true

faith I was [ (]butt the truth to you to tell[ )]

marking ∫om [ ∫ome] kattle, and asleepe [ a sleepe] I fell [ .]

Mu:

and I was ∫eeking of a long lost lamb [ lambe]

wch now I found eu'n as along you came [ ,]

Ru:

I'me glad you found itt; Mu: truly ∫oe am I

Ru:

now [ Now] lett vs goe to finde our company [ ,]

Phi:

∫ee [ See] wher ∫ome bee, Mu: itt ∫eemes [ ∫eems] to [ too] ∫oune, [ ∫oone,] alas

that loue di∫pi∫'d should [ showld] com [ come] to ∫uch a pas [ . /]

Li: :Simena: [ Lissius. Simeana.]

Loues begining like the spring

giues delight in ∫weetnes flowing

euer plea∫ant flourishing

pride in her, [ her] braue coulers [ colors] showing

Butt [ butt] loue ending is att last

like the stormes [ storms] of winters blast

Mu:

Li∫sius mee thinks you ar growne ∫ad of late,

and priuately [ priuattly] wt your owne thoughts debate

I hope you ar nott fal'ne in loue, [ ;] that boy*

can nott I trust your ∫ettled hart inioy [ enioy.]

Li:

'T'is well; you may bee merry att my fall

reioi∫e, [ reioice] nay doo, for I can lo∫e [ loo∫e] butt all;

Simena: [ Si:]

and [ And] ∫oe to much; [ :] ex: Mu: ∫ure ∫ome strang error is

Phi:

learne [ Learne] you itt out, [ :] Ru: wee'll leaue you, and bring bliss; [ Ru: Weee'll leaue you;]

Mu: [ Mu. Ile know this,]

Come Li∫sius tell mee whence pro∫eeds this griefe [ ?]

di∫couer itt, and you may find reliefe

Li:

Now I'le goe ∫eeke Phili∫ses, hee I'me ∫ure

will comfort mee who doth the like indure;

yett faire Mu∫ella do thus much for mee

as tell ∫imena [ tell fierce Simeana] she hath murder'd [ murderd] mee,

and gaine butt this that she my end will ble∫s

wth ∫ome (though ∫malest griefe) [ though ∫mallest griefe ] for my distre∫s,

and that she will butt grace my haples tombe

as to beehold mee dead by her hard dombe; [ .]

this is a ∫male [ small] request, and 't'is my last,

who[ whom] to obay, to my ∫ad end will haste

Mu:

Nay Li∫ius heere mee, tell mee ere word you goe

what ∫odaine [ ∫oddaine] matter moues in you this woe [ :]

Li:

Alas t'is loue of one I did di∫daine,

and now I ∫eeke, the like neglect I gaine

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Yett att the first she an∫werd mee wt loue,

wch made my pa∫sions more increa∫e, and moue,

butt now she ∫corns mee, and tells mee I giue

my loue in equall ∫ort to all, and driue

my ∫ighs, and plaints butt from an outward part

of fained loue, and neuer from my hart,

and when on knees I doe her fauor craue

she bids mee ∫eeke Climena, wher I gaue

as many Vowes as then to her I did,

and thervpon her ∫ight did mee forbid,

Vowing that if I euer more did speake

of loue, she would nott only speaches breake

butt euer more her ∫ight, and would bee blind

rather, then in my ∫ight her ∫elf to find;

this is the cau∫e, and this must bee my end

wch my ∫ad days to ∫addest night must lend,

Mu:

When grew this chang: Li: Alas to late, to day,

and yett to ∫oune to bring my ioys decay,

Mu:

Haue nott ∫ome made ∫ome false report of you,

Li:

I know nott butt my hart was euer true

∫ince first I Vow'd, and that my death shall tell

wch is my last hope that will plea∫e her well,

Mu:

∫oft, I will speake wth her, and know her mind,

and why on ∫uch a ∫oddaine she's vnkind,

and truly bring you an∫were what she ∫ays,

till then bee quiett for itt can noe prai∫e

bring to your death when you shall wayling dy

wth out ∫oe iust a cau∫e as to know why,

Li:

Butt will Mu∫ella do thus much for mee

shall I nott of all freinds for∫aken bee,

Mu:

Neuer of mee, and heere awhile butt stay

and I shall comfort bring your care t'allay, ex:

Li:

Ô noe, I know she will nott pitty mee,

vnfortunate, and haples must I bee,

and now thou conquering, pourefull god of loue

I doe butt thus much craue, thy forces proue,

and cast all stormes of thy iust cau∫ed rage

vpon mee Va∫sell, and noe heat a∫swage

of greatest fury ∫ince I doe de∫erue

noe fauour, nor least grace, butt heer to sterue

fed butt wt tortures; lett mee liue to ∫ee

my former ∫in in ∫oe much slighting thee

death yett more wellcome were itt nott ∫oe meete

I oft should dy who knew nott ∫ouer from ∫weet;

Simeana comes, ah mast vngratefull maide

who an∫wers loue, as one would welcome death

the neerer that itt comes the more flys, stayd

ne're butt by lims that tire wanting breath,

Yet at the first she answered me with love,

which made my passions more increase, and move,

but now she scorns me, and tells me I give

my love in equal sort to all, and drive

my sighs, and plaints but from an outward part

of feigned love, and never from my heart.

And when on knees I do her favour crave,

she bids me seek Climena, where I gave

as many vows as then to her I did.

And thereupon her sight did me forbid,

vowing that if I ever more did speak

of love, she would not only speeches break,

but ever more her sight, and would be blind

rather than in my sight herself to find.

This is the cause, and this must be my end,

which my sad days to saddest night must lend.

Musella:

When grew this change?

Lissius:

Alas, too late, today,

and yet too soon to bring my joy's decay.

Musella:

Have not some made some false report of you?

Lissius:

I know not, but my heart was ever true

since first I vowed, and that my death shall tell,

which is my last hope that will please her well.

Musella:

Soft, I will speak with her, and know her mind,

and why on such a sudden she's unkind,

and truly bring you answer what she says.

Till then be quiet, for it can no praise

bring to your death when you shall wailing die,

without so just a cause as to know why.

Lissius:

But will Musella do thus much for me?

Shall I not of all friends forsaken be?

Musella:

Never of me, and here awhile but stay,

and I shall comfort bring your care t'allay.

Exit Musella

Lissius:

O no, I know she will not pity me,

unfortunate and hapless must I be,

and now thou conquering, powerful god of love,

I do but thus much crave, thy forces prove,

and cast all storms of thy just caused rage

upon me, vassal, and no heat assuage

of greatest fury since I do deserve

no favour, nor least grace, but here to starve,

fed but with tortures. Let me live to see

my former sin in so much slighting thee.

Death yet more welcome were it not so meet,

I oft should die who knew not sour from sweet.

Simena comes, ah, most ungrateful maid,

who answers love, as one would welcome death:

the nearer that it comes the more flies, stayed

ne'er but by limbs that tire wanting breath.

yett att the first she an∫werd [ answer'd] mee wt loue,

wch made my pa∫sions more increa∫e, [ encrea∫e,] and moue,

butt now she ∫corns mee, and tells mee I giue

my loue in equall ∫ort to all, and driue

my ∫ighs, and plaints butt from an outward part

of fained loue, and neuer from my hart,

and when on knees I doe her fauor craue

she bids mee ∫eeke Climena, wher I gaue

as many Vowes as then to her I did,

and thervpon her ∫ight did mee forbid,

Vowing that if I euer more did [ if I did more moue or] speake

of loue, she would nott only speaches [ speeches] breake

butt euer more her ∫ight, and would [ wowld] bee blind

rather, [ rather] then in my ∫ight her ∫elf to find;

this is the cau∫e, and this must bee my end

wch my ∫ad days to ∫addest night must lend,

Mu:

When grew this chang: Li: Alas to late, to day,

and yett to ∫oune [ erly] to bring my ioys decay,

Mu:

Haue nott ∫ome made ∫ome false report [ haue no ill tongues reported fauls] of you,

Li:

I know nott butt my hart was euer true

∫ince first I Vow'd, and that my death shall tell

wch is my last hope that will plea∫e her well,

Mu:

∫oft, I will speake wth her, and know her mind, [ minde]

and why on ∫uch a ∫oddaine she's vnkind,

and [ then] truly bring you an∫were what she ∫ays,

till then bee quiett for itt can noe prai∫e

bring to your death when you shall wayling dy

wth out ∫oe iust a cau∫e as to know why, [ ;]

Li:

Butt will Mu∫ella do [ doe] thus much for mee [ ?]

shall I nott of all freinds for∫aken bee, [ ?]

Mu:

Neuer of mee, and heere awhile butt stay

and I shall comfort bring your [ yor] care t'allay, ex:

Li:

Ô noe, I know she will nott pitty mee,

vnfortunate, and haples must I bee,

and now thou conquering, pourefull [ powrfull] god of loue

I doe butt thus much craue, thy forces proue,

and cast all stormes of thy iust cau∫ed rage

vpon mee Va∫sell, [ Vassal] and noe heat a∫swage

of greatest fury ∫ince I doe de∫erue

noe fauour, [ favor] nor least grace, butt heer to sterue

fed butt wt tortures; [ fed wth sharpe tortures,] lett mee liue to ∫ee

my former ∫in in [ for] ∫oe much slighting thee

death yett more wellcome [ welcome] were itt nott ∫oe meete [ wer't nott in dispit]

I oft should dy who knew nott ∫ouer from ∫weet; [ to punnish mee who knew nott day from night,]

Simeana comes, ah mast vngratefull maide [ mayde]

who an∫wers [ an∫weres] loue, as one would [ wowld] welcome [ wellcom] death

the neerer that itt comes the more flys,[ ;] stayd

ne're butt by lims [ limms] that tire wanting breath,

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Soe flys she still from mee whoes loue is fixt

in purest flames wt justest meaning mixt

Mu:

Simena this can bee no ground to take

∫oe great dislike vpon one mans report,

and what may well proue faulce, as thus to make

an honest, louing hart dy in this ∫ort

∫ay that hee v∫eth others well, and ∫miles

on them who't may bee loue of him beeguiles,

or that hee v∫'d Climeana well, what then,

t'is all poor ∫oule she getts, who did contemn

and raile att her; Si: t'is true beefor my face

hee did reuile her wth words of di∫grace

my back butt turnd she was his only ioy

his best, his deerest lyfe and ∫oune destroy

him ∫elf hee would if she nott loud him still,

and iust what hee had Vow'd his hart did kill

for my di∫daine, hee shamles did protest

wth in one houer to her cau∫d his vnrest;

can I beare this, who liu'd ∫oe long di∫daind

now to bee mock'd, I thought I loue had gaind;

and nott more ∫corne, butt ∫ince thus much I find

I ame glad the ioy nott deepe in my mind

Mu:

fy, fy Simeana leaue thes doubts to farr

all reddy growne to breede ∫oe great a iarr,

t'was butt his dutty kindly once to speake

to her who for him would her poore hart breake,

would you nott thinke itt ∫inn quite to vndoe

a ∫illy mayd wt ∫corne, butt lett thes goe

thinke you if I did loue, and that I ∫aw

hee v∫'d more well, would I my loue wth draw

from him for that Ô! noe great cau∫e may bee

to moue good lookes, mustrust nott butt bee free

from this vild humor of bace iealou∫ie

wch breedeth nothing butt ∫elf mi∫erie;

for this beeleeue while you your ∫elf are iust

you can nott any way your loue distrust,

lett him di∫cour∫e, and ∫mile, and what of this

is hee the liklier in his fayth to mi∫s

noe, neuer feare him for his outward ∫miles

't'is priuae freindship that our trust beguiles,

and therfor lett nott Arcas flattering skill

haue pouer in your brest his de∫erts to ∫pill

Li∫sius is worthy, and a worthy loue

hee bears to you, then thes conceits remoue,

Si:

Arcas did ∫ee them ∫itt too priuately

and ki∫s; and then imbrace, Mu: well if hee did

Si:

and in her eare di∫cource familliarly

when they did thinke itt should from bee hid

Mu:

Lord how one may coniecture if one feare

all things they doubt to bee the ∫ame they feare

though priuate must itt follow hee's vntrue,

or that they whisper'd must bee kept from you,

fy leaue thes follys, and beegin to think

you haue your loue brought to deaths riuer brinck,

repent you haue him wrong'd, and now cherish

So flies she still from me whose love is fixed

in purest flames with justest meaning mixed.

Musella:

Simena this can be no ground to take

so great dislike upon one man's report,

and what may well prove false, as thus to make

an honest, loving heart die in this sort.

Say that he useth others well, and smiles

on them who't may be love of him beguiles,

or that he used Climena well, what then?

'Tis all, poor soul, she gets, who did condemn

and rail at her.

Simena: 'Tis true, before my face

he did revile her with words of disgrace;

my back but turned, she was his only joy,

his best, his dearest life and soon destroy

himself he would if she not loved him still,

and just what he had vowed his heart did kill.

For my disdain, he shameless did protest

within one hour to her caused his unrest.

Can I bear this, who lived so long disdained,

now to be mocked? I thought I love had gained,

and not more scorn, but since thus much I find,

I am glad the joy sank not deep in my mind.

Musella:

Fie, fie, Simena, leave these doubts, too far

already grown to breed so great a jar.

'Twas but his duty kindly once to speak

to her who for him would her poor heart break.

Would you not think it sin quite to undo

a silly maid with scorn? But let these go;

think you if I did love, and that I saw

he used more well, would I my love withdraw

from him for that? O, no great cause may be

to move good looks, mistrust not, but be free

from this vile humour of base jealousy,

which breedeth nothing but self misery,

for this believe: while you yourself are just,

you cannot any way your love distrust.

Let him discourse, and smile, and what of this?

Is he the likelier in his faith to miss?

No, never fear him for his outward smiles,

'tis private friendship that our trust beguiles,

and therefore let not Arcas' flattering skill

have power in your breast his deserts to spill.

Lissius is worthy, and a worthy love

he bears to you, then these conceits remove.

Simena:

Arcas did see them sit too privately,

and kiss, and then embrace.

Musella: Well, if he did?

Simena:

And in her ear discourse familiarly,

when they did think it should from [me] be hid.

Musella:

Lord, how one may conjecture if one fear,

all things they doubt to be, the same they fear;

though private must it follow he's untrue,

or that they whispered must be kept from you?

Fie, leave these follies, and begin to think

you have your love brought to death's river brink.

Repent you have him wronged, and now cherish

Soe flys [ hasts] she still from mee whoes loue is fixt

in purest flames wt justest meaning [ wth out all bacenes] mixt

Mu:

Simena [ Simeana] this can bee no ground to take

∫oe great dislike vpon one mans report,

and what may well proue faulce, as thus to make

an honest, louing hart dy in this ∫ort

∫ay that hee v∫eth others well, and ∫miles

on them who't may bee loue of him [ them] beeguiles, [ beguiles]

or that hee v∫'d Climeana well, what then, [ ?]

t'is all poor ∫oule she getts, who did contemn

and raile att her; Si: t'is true beefor [ befor] my face

hee did reuile her wth [ wt] words of di∫grace

my back butt turnd she was his only ioy

his best, his deerest lyfe and ∫oune [ ∫oone] destroy [ distroy]

him ∫elf [ him∫elf] hee would [ wowld] if she nott loud [ lou'd] him still,

and iust what hee had Vow'd his hart did kill

for my di∫daine, hee shamles did protest

wth [ wt] in one houer [ howre] to her cau∫d his vnrest;

can [ Can] I beare this, who liu'd ∫oe long di∫daind [ di∫dain'd]

now to bee mock'd, [ mockt!] I thought I loue had gaind;

and nott more ∫corne, butt ∫ince thus much I find

I ame [ I'm] glad the ioy ∫ank nott deepe [ ioy ∫ank noe deeper] in my mind [ :]

Mu:

fy, fy [ Fye, fye] Simeana [ Simena] leaue thes doubts to [ too] farr

all reddy [ already] growne to breede ∫oe great a iarr,

t'was butt his dutty kindly once to speake

to her who for him would her poore hart breake,

would you nott thinke itt ∫inn quite to vndoe

a ∫illy mayd wt [ wth] ∫corne, butt lett thes goe

thinke you if I did loue, and that I ∫aw

hee v∫'d more well, would I my loue wth draw [ wtdraw!]

from him for that [ ?] Ô! [ O] noe great cau∫e may bee

to moue good lookes, mustrust nott butt bee free

from this vild humor [ humour] of bace iealou∫ie

wch breedeth nothing butt ∫elf mi∫erie;

for this beeleeue while you your [ yor] ∫elf are iust

you can nott [ cannott] any way your loue distrust, [ mistrust]

lett him di∫cour∫e, and ∫mile, and what of this [ ?]

is hee the liklier [ likelier] in his fayth [ faith] to mi∫s [ ?]

noe, [ no,] neuer feare him for his outward ∫miles

't'is [ t'is] priuate [ priuatt] freindship that our trust beguiles,

and therfor lett nott Arcas flattering [ flattring] skill

haue pouer [ powre] in your brest his de∫erts [ desarts] to ∫pill

Li∫sius is worthy, and a worthy loue

hee bears to you, then thes conceits remoue,

Si:

Arcas did ∫ee them ∫itt too priuately

and ki∫s; [ ,] and then imbrace, [ embrace:] Mu: well if hee did

Si:

and in her eare di∫cource familliarly

when they did thinke itt should [ showld] from [ mee] bee hid

Mu:

Lord [ ,] how one may coniecture if one feare

all things they doubt to bee the ∫ame they feare

though priuate must itt follow hee's vntrue,

or that they whisper'd [ whisperd] must bee kept from you,

fy leaue thes follys, and beegin to think

you haue your loue brought to deaths riuer brinck, [ brink]

repent you haue him wrong'd, and now cherish

the diing lad who els ∫oune [ ∫oone] will perish

goe aske him pardon; [ :] Si: pardon why,[ ?] that hee

the more may brag [ bragg] hee twi∫e hath cou∫end mee

Mu:

nay [ Nay] hee is past all braging, mend your fault,

and ∫orry bee you haue his torment wrought

∫ee wher hee lies, the truest ∫igne of woe

goe haste, and ∫aue him, loues wings are nott slowe,

Page of Huntington manuscript.

the diing lad who els ∫oune will perish

goe aske him pardon; Si: pardon why, that hee

the more may brag hee twi∫e hath cou∫end mee

Mu:

nay hee is past all braging, mend your fault,

and ∫orry bee you haue his torment Wrought

∫ee wher hee lies, the truest ∫igne of woe

goe haste, and ∫aue him, loues wings are nott slowe,

Si:

Ô deerest Li∫sius looke butt vp, and speake

to mee most wreched, who∫e hart now must breake

wth ∫elf accu∫ing of a cur∫ed wrong

wch rashly bred, did win beeleefe to strong;

ah cast butt vp thyn eyes, ∫ee my true teares,

and View butt her, who now all torment beares;

doe butt looke vp, and thou shalt ∫ee mee dy

for hauing wrong'd thee wt my iealou∫ie

Li:

To ∫ee thee dy? alas I dy for thee

what plea∫ure can thy death then bring to mee

yett if loue make you ∫ay this, then poor I

shall much more happy, and more ble∫sed dy

Si:

Nay lett mee ende, beefor thy end I ∫ee

alas I loue you, and 't'was loue in mee

bred this great ill; bu ielou∫ie abu∫'de

I brought your harme, and my best loue abu∫'d,

Li:

Ô ioy, wch now doth ∫well as much as griefe,

and plea∫ing, yett doth make mee ∫eeke reliefe,

ame I my ∫elf? noe I am only ioy,

nott Li∫sius, griefe did lately him destroy,

I am ∫imeanas loue, her slaue reuiu'd,

late hopeles dead, now haue dispaire ∫uruiu'd

Mu:

All care now past, lett ioy in triumph ∫itt

this for ∫uch louers euer is most fitt,

this doth beecome that happy louing paire

who ∫eeke to nur∫e the ioys that kill all care;

lett tho∫e fall out, mistrust, wrangle, and iarr

who loue for fashion nott for loue; butt warr

nott you, the couple Cupid best doth loue

who∫e troubled harts his Godheads ∫elf did moue

Li:

Mu∫ella you haue turnd this cloudy day

to ∫weet, and plea∫ant light, nor can I ∫ay

∫oe much as in my hart this kindnes breeds

for now delight all forme, and speech exceeds

butt lett vs happy now, vnhappy bee

when in vs least vnthankfullnes you ∫ee

Si:

Lett mee my ∫elf, nay my deere Li∫sius leaue

when I in ∫eruice, or in faith deceaue

Mu∫ella, ∫ole restorer of this ioy,

and ieaLo∫ie anew striue to destroy

our lous, and hopes if I forgettfull bee

the dying lad, who else soon will perish.

Go ask him pardon.

Simena: Pardon why? That he

the more may brag, he twice hath cozened me.

Musella:

Nay, he is past all bragging, mend your fault,

and sorry be you have his torment wrought.

See where he lies, the truest sign of woe;

go haste, and save him, love's wings are not slow.

Simena:

O dearest Lissius, look but up, and speak

to me most wretched, whose heart now must break

with self-accusing of a cursed wrong,

which rashly bred, did win belief too strong.

Ah, cast but up thine eyes, see my true tears,

and view but her, who now all torment bears.

Do but look up, and thou shalt see me die

for having wronged thee with my jealousy.

Lissius:

To see thee die? Alas, I die for thee.

What pleasure can thy death then bring to me?

Yet if love make you say this, then poor I

shall much more happy, and more blessed die.

Simena:

Nay, let me end, before thy end I see.

Alas, I love you, and 'twas love in me

bred this great ill, by jealousy abused

I brought your harm, and my best love abused.

Lissius:

O joy, which now doth swell as much as grief,

and pleasing, yet doth make me seek relief.

Am I myself? No, I am only joy,

not Lissius, grief did lately him destroy.

I am Simena's love, her slave revived,

late hopeless dead, now have despair survived.

Musella:

All care now past, let joy in triumph sit,

this for such lovers ever is most fit.

This doth become that happy loving pair

who seek to nurse the joys that kill all care.

Let those fall out, mistrust, wrangle, and jar,

who love for fashion, not for love; but war

not you, the couple Cupid best doth love,

whose troubled hearts his Godhead's self did move.

Lissius:

Musella, you have turned this cloudy day

to sweet and pleasant light, nor can I say

so much as in my heart this kindness breeds

for now delight all form and speech exceeds.

But let us happy now, unhappy be

when in us least unthankfullness you see.

Simena:

Let me myself, nay my dear Lissius, leave

when I in service, or in faith deceive

Musella, sole restorer of this joy,

and jealousy anew strive to destroy

our loves and hopes if I forgetful be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Si:

Ô deerest Li∫sius looke butt vp, and speake

to mee most wreched, who∫e hart now must breake

wth ∫elf accu∫ing of a cur∫ed wrong

wch rashly bred, did win beeleefe to strong;

ah cast butt vp thyn [ thine] eyes, ∫ee my true teares,

and View [ view] butt her, who now all torment beares;

doe butt looke vp, and thou shalt ∫ee mee dy

for hauing wrong'd thee wt my iealou∫ie [ iealou∫y;]

Li:

To ∫ee thee dy? alas [ Alas] I dy for thee

what plea∫ure can thy death then bring to mee [ ?]

yett if loue make you ∫ay this, then poor [ poore] I

shall much more happy, and more ble∫sed dy [ ;]

Si:

Nay lett mee ende, beefor [ befor] thy end I ∫ee

alas I loue you, and 't'was loue in mee

bred this great ill; by [ wth] ielou∫ie abu∫'de [ confu∫'d]

I brought your harme, and my best loue abu∫'d,

Li:

Ô [ O] ioy, wch now doth ∫well as much as griefe,

and plea∫ing, yett doth make mee ∫eeke reliefe,

ame [ Am] I my ∫elf? noe I am only ioy,

nott Li∫sius, griefe did lately him destroy,

I am ∫imeanas loue, her slaue reuiu'd,

late hopeles dead, now haue dispaire ∫uruiu'd [ ,]

Mu:

All care now past, lett ioy in triumph ∫itt

this for ∫uch louers euer is most fitt,

this doth beecome [ become] that happy louing paire

who ∫eeke to nur∫e the ioys that kill all care; [ dispaire,]

lett tho∫e fall out, mistrust, wrangle, and iarr

who loue for fashion [ ,] nott for loue; butt warr

nott you, the couple Cupid best doth loue

who∫e troubled harts his Godheads ∫elf did moue [ .]

Li:

Mu∫ella you haue turnd this cloudy [ clowdy] day

to ∫weet, and plea∫ant light, nor can I ∫ay

∫oe much as in my hart this kindnes breeds [ ,]

for now delight all forme, and speech exceeds [ ,]

butt lett vs happy [ hapy] now, vnhappy bee

when in vs least vnthankfullnes you ∫ee

Si:

Lett mee my ∫elf, nay my deere Li∫sius leaue

when I in ∫eruice, or in faith deceaue [ de∫eaue]

Mu∫ella, ∫ole restorer of this ioy,

and iealo∫ie anew [ a new] striue to destroy

our lous, [ loues,] and hopes if I forgettfull bee

Page of Huntington manuscript.

of this increa∫e of lost felicitie;

butt now my Li∫sius haue you mee forgiu'n

my last offence by loue, and fearing driu'ne

Li:

Thou lou'st mee, t'is enough, and now inioy

all blis, bring noe doubts now to cro∫s our ioy

I all forgett, and only hold thee deere,

and from you, all faults past my loue doth cleare

Si:

Soe lett vs euer doubtles liue, and loue

and noe mistrust in least ∫ort our harts moue

Li:

noe doubt of thee shall euer stirr in mine,

Si:

nor breed in mee; ∫oe wholy I ame thine;

Mu:

Happy this time, and ble∫sed bee your loues,

and most accur∫ed they that other moues;

liue both contented, and still liue as one;

neuer deuided till your liues bee dunn;

Fillis, Dalina, Phili∫ses, Arcas

Climeana, Rustick,

Mu:

Heere comes the flock; Ru: wee're all heer now; Mu: 'tis true

wee all are heere, and one to much by you

Da:

Heere bee our fellowes now lett vs beegin

∫ome pretty pastime plea∫ures for to win,

∫weetest Mu∫ella what think you is best

Mu:

That wherunto your phant∫ie is adrest

Da:

mine is to ridling, Si:, and indeed that's good

Cli:

butt mee thinks nott least they bee vnderstood,

Si:

vnderstood, why ∫oe shall all bee that I make,

Cli:

tush you'l ∫ay one thing, and an other take

Si:

You'll still bee wrangling; Da: I, and for a man

would I might liue till quarell I beegan

On ∫uch a cau∫e, butt pray now quiett bee,

and faire Mu∫ella, first beegin wt mee,

Fillis:

butt must the riddles bee expounded; Da: noe

Mu:

Then I'le beegin though ∫carce the play doe know

That I wish wch wt most paine

I must gaine

that I shun wch wt ∫uch ea∫e,

cannott plea∫e

that most ea∫y still I fly;

bar'd I fainest would come ny;

Da:

of this increase of lost felicity.

But now my Lissius, have you me forgiv'n

my last offence, by love, and fearing driven?

Lissius:

Thou lov'st me, 'tis enough, and now enjoy

all bliss, bring no doubts now to cross our joy.

I all forget, and only hold thee dear,

and from you, all faults past my love doth clear.

Simena:

So let us ever doubtless live and love,

and no mistrust in least sort our hearts move.

Lissius:

No doubt of thee shall ever stir in mine.

Simena:

Nor breed in me, so wholly I am thine.

Musella:

Happy this time, and blessed be your loves,

and most accursed they that other moves;

live both contented, and still live as one,

never divided till your lives be done.

Enter Fillis, Dalina, Philisses, Arcas, Climena, Rustick.

Musella:

Here comes the flock.

Rustick:

We're all here now.

Musella: 'Tis true,

we all are here, and one too much by you.

Dalina:

Here be our fellows, now let us begin

some pretty pastime, pleasures for to win.

Sweetest Musella, what think you is best?

Musella:

That whereunto your fantasy is addressed.

Dalina:

Mine is to riddling.

Simena:

And indeed that's good.

Climena:

But methinks not, lest they be understood.

Simena:

Understood? Why so shall all be that I make.

Climena:

Tush you'll say one thing, and another take.

Simena:

You'll still be wrangling.

Dalina:

Aye, and for a man,

would I might live till quarrel I began

on such a cause, but pray, now quiet be.

And fair Musella, first begin with me.

Fillis:

But must the riddles be expounded.

Dalina:

No.

Musella:

Then I'll begin though scarce the play do know.

That I wish which with most pain

I must gain.

That I shun which with such ease

cannot please.

That most easy still I fly

Barred, I fainest would come nigh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ridling: as with the other games associated with questioni d'amore, the drawing of riddles was a popular pastime, not just a literary device.

of this increa∫e [ encrea∫e] of lost felicitie;

butt now my Li∫sius haue you mee forgiu'n [ forgiuen]

my last offence [ ?] by loue, and fearing driu'ne [ driu'n;]

Li:

Thou lou'st [ loust] mee, t'is enough, and now inioy

all blis, [ rest,] bring noe doubts now to cro∫s our ioy

I all forgett, and only hold thee deere,

and from you, [ thee] all faults past my loue doth cleare

Si:

Soe lett vs euer doubtles liue, and loue [ ,]

and noe mistrust in least ∫ort our harts moue [ .]

Li:

noe [ Noe] doubt of thee shall euer stirr in mine,

Si:

nor [ Nor] breed in mee; ∫oe wholy [ wholly] I ame [ am] thine;

Mu:

Happy [ Hapy] this time, and ble∫sed bee your loues, [ lous,]

and most accur∫ed they that other moues; [ mous,]

liue both contented, and still liue [ liue still] as one; [ ,]

neuer deuided till your liues bee dunn; / [ dun; /]

Fillis, Dalina, Phili∫ses, Arcas

Climeana, [ Climena] Rustick,

Mu:

Heere comes [ coms] the flock; Ru: wee're [ w'are] all heer now; Mu: 'tis [ t'is] true

wee all are heere, and one to much by you [ ;]

Da:

Heere bee our [ owr] fellowes now lett vs beegin

∫ome pretty pastime plea∫ures for [ sport] to winn,

∫weetest Mu∫ella what think you is best

Mu:

That [ that] wherunto your phant∫ie is adrest

Da:

mine [ Myne] is to ridling,* Si:, and indeed that's good

Cli:

butt mee thinks nott least they bee vnderstood,

Si:

vnderstood, [ Vnderstood?] why ∫oe shall all bee that I make,

Cli:

tush [ Tush] you'l [ you'll] ∫ay one thing, and an other take

Si:

You'll still bee wrangling; Da: I, and for a man

would [ wowld] I might liue till quarell I beegan

on ∫uch a cau∫e, butt pray now quiett [ quiet] bee,

and [ And] faire Mu∫ella, first beegin [ begin] wt mee,

Fillis: [ Fi:]

butt [ Butt] must the riddles bee expounded; [ ?] Da: noe

Mu:

Then I'le beegin [ beginn] though ∫carce the play doe [ I] know

That I wish wch wt [ wth] most paine

I must gaine

that I shun wch wt [ wth] ∫uch ea∫e,

cannott [ cann nott] plea∫e

that [ That] most ea∫y still I fly;

bar'd I fainest would come ny; [ com by;]

Da:

Page of Huntington manuscript.

I ame the next marke then what I will ∫ay

'best is my louers can nott mee beetray

What I ∫eeke can neuer bee

found in mee

faine I would that try, and find

wch my mind

euer yett from my hart kept

till away my luck was stept

Phi:

Lett them alone the woemen still will speake

Rustick come you, and I this cour∫e will breake

Late I ∫aw a starr to shine

who∫e light mee thought was only mine

till a cloude came; and did hide

that light from mee wher light doth bide

yett tell mee how can thes agree

that light though dim'd, that light I ∫ee,

Li:

Now Rustick, fortune's falling on your head,

bring forth your riddle, fy, in loue, and dead

to ∫uch a sport, think nott vpon the day

ther is noe danger in't I dare well ∫ay,

Ru:

truly I can nott ridle, I' was nott taught

thes triks of witt, my thoughts noe higher wrought

then how to marke a beast, or driue a Cowe

to feed, or els wt art to hold a plowe,

wch if you knew, you ∫urely ∫oune would finde

a matter more of waight then thes od things

wch neuer profitt butt ∫ome laughter brings,

thes others bee of body, and of minde,

Phi:

spoke like a husband, though you yett are non

butt come, what is this sport allredy dunn

Ru:

I' can nott riddle: Da: whistle, t'is as good

for you ∫ufficiently are vnderstood

Ru:

What meane you: Da: nought, butt that you are

an honest man, and thrifty, full of care;

Ru:

I thought you had ment wur∫e: Da: men't wur∫e, what I

fy, this doth show your doubt, and iealou∫ie;

why should you take my meaning wur∫e then 't'is

Ru:

Nay I butt ∫mile to ∫ee how all you mi∫s

butt ∫ome shall finde when I doe ∫eeme to ∫mile,

and showe best plea∫'d I oftnes't doe beeguile

Da:

Your ∫elf you meane, for few els doe respect

your ∫miles, or frownes, therfor doe nott neglect

your plea∫ant youth, ill will is too ∫oune gott;

and once that rooted, nott ∫oe ∫oune forgott;

Phi:

You grow too wi∫e, dispute noe more, heere bee

Dalina:

I am the next; mark then what I will say.

Best is: my lovers cannot me betray.

What I seek can never be

found in me;

fain I would that try, and find

which my mind

ever yet from my heart kept,

till away my luck was stepped.

Philisses:

Let them alone the women still will speak.

Rustick come, you and I this course will break:

Late I saw a star to shine,

whose light methought was only mine,

till a cloud came and did hide

that light from me where light doth bide,

yet tell me how can these agree

that light though dimmed, that light I see.

Lissius:

Now Rustick, fortune's falling on your head,

bring forth your riddle; fie, in love, and dead

to such a sport! Think not upon the day,

there is no danger in't, I dare well say.

Rustick:

Truly I cannot riddle, I was not taught

these tricks of wit; my thoughts no higher wrought

than how to mark a beast, or drive a cow

to feed, or else with art to hold a plough,

which if you knew, you surely soon would find

a matter more of weight than these odd things

which never profit, but some laughter brings.

These others be of body, and of mind.

Philisses:

Spoke like a husband, though you yet are none,

but come, what, is this sport already done?

Rustick:

I cannot riddle.

Dalina:

Whistle, 'tis as good,

for you sufficiently are understood.

Rustick:

What mean you?

Dalina: Nought, but that you are

an honest man, and thrifty, full of care.

Rustick:

I thought you had meant worse.

Dalina:

Meant worse, what I?

Fie, this doth show your doubt, and jealousy,

why should you take my meaning worse than 'tis?

Rustick:

Nay, I but smile to see how all you miss,

but some shall find when I do seem to smile,

and show best pleased, I oft'nest do beguile.

Dalina:

Yourself you mean, for few else do respect

your smiles, or frowns, therefore do not neglect

your pleasant youth, ill will is too soon got,

and once that rooted, not so soon forgot.

Philisses:

You grow too wise, dispute no more, here be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can nott ridle: another example of Rustic's unsuitableness as a partner for Musella, one does wonder how his marriage to the witty and (at times) cynical Dalina will pan out. Rustic's remarks again seem like a faint echo of Touchstone's conversation with William in As You Like It concerning court versus country life -- though Touchstone satirises the former as much as the latter.

I ame the next marke then what I will ∫ay

'best [ best] is my louers can nott mee beetray

What I ∫eeke can neuer bee

found in mee

faine I would that try, and find

wch my mind

euer yett from my hart kept

till away my luck was stept [ ;]

Phi:

Lett them alone the woemen still will speake

Rustick come you, [ com, you,]and I this cour∫e will breake

Late I ∫aw a starr to shine

who∫e light mee thought was only mine

till a cloude [ clowd] came; and did hide

that light from mee wher light doth [ did] bide

yett tell mee how can thes agree

that [ That] light though dim'd, [ dimd,] that light I ∫ee,

Li:

Now Rustick, fortune's falling on your head,

bring forth your [ yor] riddle, fy, in loue, and dead

to ∫uch a sport, [ ?] think nott vpon the day

ther is noe danger in't I dare well ∫ay,

Ru:

truly [ Truly] I can nott ridle, I' was nott taught

thes triks of witt, my thoughts noe [ ne're] higher wrought

then how to marke [ marck] a beast, or driue a Cowe [ cowe]

to feed, or els wt [ wth] art to hold a plowe,

wch if you knew, you ∫urely ∫oune [ ∫oone] would finde

a matter more of waight [ worth] then thes od things

wch neuer profitt [ ,] butt ∫ome laughter brings,

thes others bee of body, and of minde,

Phi:

spoke like a husband, though you yett are non [ ar none,]

butt come, what is this sport allredy dunn [ done]

Ru:

I' can nott riddle: [ ;] Da: whistle, t'is as good

for you ∫ufficiently are [ ar] vnderstood

Ru:

What meane you: [ ;] Da: nought, [ naught] butt that [ yt] you are

an honest man, and thrifty, full of care; [ ,]

Ru:

I thought you had ment wur∫e: Da: men't [ meant] wur∫e, what I [ ?]

fy, this doth show your doubt, and iealou∫ie; [ .]

why should you take my meaning wur∫e then 't'is [ ?]

Ru:

Nay I butt ∫mile to ∫ee how all you mi∫s

butt ∫ome shall finde when I doe ∫eeme to ∫mile, [ ∫myle,]

and showe best plea∫'d I oftnes't doe beeguile [ beguile.]

Da:

your ∫elf you meane, for few els doe respect

your ∫miles, or frownes, therfor doe nott neglect

your plea∫ant youth, ill will is too ∫oune [ ∫oone] gott;

and once that rooted, nott ∫oe ∫oune [ ∫oone] forgott;

Phi:

You grow too wi∫e, dispute noe more, heere [ heer] bee

Page of Huntington manuscript.

others who will lett vs ther hearers bee,

and giue this sport ∫ome lyfe againe wch you

allmost made dead; Da: I haue dunn lett ioy in∫ue;

Li:

Gue∫s you all what this can bee,

∫nake to ∫uffer fire I ∫ee,

a fogue, and yett a cleere bright day,

a light wch better were away,

tow ∫unns att once both shining cleere,

and wth out enuy hold each deare,

Fillis:

A spring I hop'd for butt that di'de

then on the next word my hopes relide

butt ∫ommer past the latter spring

could mee butt former lo∫ses bring

I di'de wt them, yett still I liue

while autume can noe comfort giue;/

Mu:

Vnmanerly I must your pre∫ence leaue

∫ent for in haste vnto mother, word butt

I hope in this ∫weet place ∫oune to receaue

your most lou'd companies, and ∫oe to putt

good Rustick into better humours ∫ay

will you bee merry; ex: Ru: I'le nott after stay;/

Phi:

noe follow; shadowes neuer ab∫ent bee

when ∫unn shines, word in wch ble∫sing you may ∫ee

your shadow'de ∫elf, who nothing in truth are

butt the reflection of her too great care

what will you farder doe; Da: lett vs depart

Ar:

come lett's away, butt ∫ome ere long will ∫mart

Phi:

when shall wee meet againe, Da: when day apeers,

Li:

noe nott till ∫unn who all foule mists still cleers,

Phi:

why then att ∫unn, and who shall then mi∫s heare

a punishment by vs ordainde must beare,

Da:

lett itt bee ∫oe; Fillis; for mee I'me well agreed;

Li∫sius:

∫oe are wee all, and ∫unn must show appeere wt ∫peede ƒ

others who will let us their hearers be,

and give this sport some life again which you

almost made dead.

Dalina: I have done, let joy ensue.

Lissius:

Guess you all what this can be:

A snake to suffer fire I see,

a fog, and yet a clear bright day,

a light which better were away,

two suns at once both shining clear,

and without envy hold each dear.

Phillis:

A Spring I hoped for, but that died,

then on the next my hopes relied,

but Summer passed, the latter Spring

could me but former losses bring.

I died with them, yet still I live

while Autumn can no comfort give.

Musella:

Unmannerly I must your presence leave,

sent for in haste unto Mother, but

I hope in this sweet place soon to receive

your most loved companies, and so, to put

good Rustick into better humours, say

will you be merry?

Exit Musella

Rustick: I'll not after stay.

Exit Rustick

Philisses:

No, follow; shadows never absent be

when sun shines, in which blessing you may see

your shadowed self, who nothing in truth are,

but the reflection of her too great care.

What will you further doe?

Dalina:

Let us depart.

Arcas:

Come, let's away, but some ere long will smart.

Philisses:

When shall we meet again?

Dalina:

When day appears.

Lissius:

No, not till sun who all foul mists still clears.

Philisses:

Why, then at sun, and who shall then miss here.

a punishment by us ordained must bear.

Dalina:

Let it be so.

Phillis: For me I'm well agreed.

Lissius:

So are we all, and sun appear with speed.

others who will lett vs ther [ theyr] hearers bee,

and giue this sport ∫ome lyfe againe wch you

allmost made dead; Da: I haue dunn lett ioy in∫ue; [ en∫ue]

Li:

Gue∫s you all what this can bee,

a ∫nake to ∫uffer fire I ∫ee,

a fogue, [ fogg,] and yett a cleere bright day,

a light wch better were away,

tow [ Too] ∫unns att once [ ,] both shining cleere,

and wth [ wt] out enuy hold each deare, [ deere: /]

Fillis:

A spring I hop'd for butt that [ yt] di'de

then on the next I my hopes relide

butt ∫ommer [ ∫ummer] past the latter spring

could mee butt former lo∫ses bring

I di'de [ dy'de] wt [ wth] them, yett still I liue

while autume [ Autume] can noe comfort giue;/

Mu:

Vnmanerly I must your pre∫ence leaue

∫ent for in haste vnto [ my] mother, ∫oune butt

I hope in this ∫weet place ∫oune [ ∫oone] to receaue

your most lou'd companies, and ∫oe to putt

good Rustick into better humours ∫ay

will you bee merry; ex: Ru: I'le nott after stay;/

Phi:

noe [ Noe] follow; shadowes neuer ab∫ent bee

when ∫unn shines, but ∫oe in wch ble∫sing you may ∫ee

your [ yor] shadow'de ∫elf, who nothing in truth are

butt the reflection of her too great care [ ;]

what will you farder doe; [ do?] Da: lett vs depart

Ar:

come [ I] lett's away, butt ∫ome ere long will ∫mart [ :]

Phi:

when shall wee meet againe, [ ?] Da: when day apeers,

Li:

noe [ Noe] nott till ∫unn who all foule mists still cleers,

Phi:

why then att ∫unn, and who shall then mi∫s heare [ heere]

a punishment by vs ordainde [ ordain'd] must [ shall] beare,

Da:

lett [ Lett] itt bee ∫oe; Fillis; [ Fill:] for mee I'me well agreed; [ I'me very well agreed;]

Li∫sius:

∫oe [ Soe] are wee all, and ∫unn [ ∫un] must show appeere wt ∫peede ƒ [ ; /]

flourish

Page of Huntington manuscript.

Venus, Cupid

Now haue thy torments long enough indurd

and of thy force they are enough a∫sur'd

O hold thy hande, als I pitty nov

tho∫ who∫e great pride did vhilum ∫corne to bov

thou hast parformd thy promi∫e, and thy state

nov it confest o slacken then thy hate

they humble doe theyr harts, and thoughts to thee

beehold them, and word accept them, word and milde bee,

thy conquest is ∫ufficient ∫aue the spoyles

and lett them only taken bee in toyles

butt ∫ett att liberty againe to tell

thy might, word and clemency vch doth excell

Cupid;

I meane to ∫aue them, butt ∫ome yett must try

word more paine ere they theyr ble∫sings may come ny

butt in the end all shall bee vell againe

and ∫veetest is that loue obtaind vt paine

mu∫ique

Loue thy powerfull hand wt drav

all doe yeeld vnto thy law

rebells now thy ∫ubiects bee

bound they are vho late word were free

most confe∫s thy power, and might

all harts yeeld vnto thy right

thoughts directed ar by thee

∫ouls doe striue thy ioys to ∫ee

pitty then, and mercy giue

vnto them vher you doe liue

they your images doe proue

in them may you ∫ee great loue

they your mirours, you theyr eye

word by wch they word true loue doe word spy

∫cea∫e avhile theyr cruell ∫marts

and beehold theyr yeelding harts

greater glory 'tis to ∫aue

vhen that you a conquest haue

then vt tiranny to pre∫s

vch still make the honor les

Gods doe prin∫es hands direct

then to thes haue ∫ome respect ; ƒ

Cupid

Venus:

Now have thy torments long enough endured,

and of thy force they are enough assured.

O hold thy hand; alas, I pity now

those whose great pride did whilum scorn to bow,

Thou hast performed thy promise, and thy state

now is confessed. O slacken then thy hate.

They humble do their hearts, and thoughts to thee,

behold them, and accept them, and mild be.

Thy conquest is sufficient, save the spoils

and let them only taken be in toils.

But set at liberty again to tell

thy might, and clemency which doth excel.

Cupid:

I mean to save them, but some yet must try

more pain ere they their blessings may come nigh.

But in the end, all shall be well again

and sweetest is that love obtained with pain.

Music [Song of the Priests, as noted in penshurst]

Love, thy powerful hand withdraw,

all do yield unto thy law,

rebels now thy subjects be,

bound they are who late were free.

Most confess thy power, and might,

all hearts yield unto thy right,

thoughts directed are by thee,

souls do strive thy joys to see.

Pity then, and mercy give

unto them where you do live,

they your images do prove,

in them may you see great love.

They your mirrors, you their eye

by which they true love do spy;

cease awhile their cruel smarts

and behold their yielding hearts.

Greater glory 'tis to save

when that you a conquest have,

than with tyranny to press

which still make[s] the honour less.

Gods do princes' hands direct,

then to these have some respect.

 

torments: where Cupid is capricious, venus is compassionate and causes some respite for the (favoured) lovers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Venus: the deletion of Venus' speech and that of Cupid below in favour of the Priests' song lays greater emphasis on Venus' continuing power

Venus, [ and] Cupid

[ Ve:]

Now haue thy torments* long enough indurd [ endur'd]

and of thy force they are enough a∫sur'd

O hold thy hande, [ hand,] als [ alas] I pitty now

tho∫ [ tho∫e] who∫e great pride did vhilum [ lately] ∫corne to bow [ bow,]

thou hast parformd [ perform'd] thy promi∫e, and thy state

now is confest o [ o] slacken then thy hate

they humble doe [ do] theyr harts, and thoughts to thee

beehold [ behold] them, and once accept them, butt and milde bee,

thy conquest is ∫ufficient ∫aue the [ thy] spoyles

and lett them only taken bee in toyles [ ,]

butt ∫ett att liberty againe to tell

thy might, word and clemency wch doth excell

Cupid; [ Cu:]

I meane to ∫aue them, butt ∫ome yett must try

my more paine ere they theyr ble∫sings may come ny [ ,]

butt in the end all [ most] shall bee [ shalbee] well againe

and ∫weetest is that loue obtaind wt [ wth] paine

Venus*

Loue a god did slander beare

gain'd his pardon and his power

butt

mu∫ique [ The musique or ∫ong

of the Priests; ]

Loue thy powerfull [ powrfull] hand wt draw

all doe yeeld vnto thy law [ lawe,]

rebells now thy ∫ubiects bee

bound they are who late was were free

most confe∫s thy power, [ powre,] and might

all harts yeeld vnto thy right

thoughts directed [ derected] ar by thee

∫ouls [ ∫oules] doe striue thy ioys to ∫ee

pitty then, and mercy giue

vnto them [ to tho∫e harts] wher you doe liue

they your images [ Images] doe proue

in them may you ∫ee great loue

they your mirours, [ Mirrors,] you theyr eye [ eyes]

wher by wch they may true loue doe de∫cry spy

∫cea∫e [ Ea∫e] awhile theyr cruell ∫marts [ ,]

and beehold theyr yeelding [ humble] harts [ ,]

greater glory 'tis to ∫aue

when that you a [ the] conquest haue

then wt tiranny to pre∫s

wch still make the honor les [ le∫s,]

Gods doe prin∫es [ Princes] hands direct

then to thes haue ∫ome respect ; ƒ [ /]

Cupid

Now your part coms to play

in this you must ∫omething ∫way

∫oe you shall, and i your child

when you bid can ∫oone be milde ƒ

Page of Huntington manuscript.

The 5 Act;/

Mu∫ella, Simena;

Mu:

O eyes that day can ∫ee, and can nott mend

what my ioy's poy∫on, must my wreched end

pro∫eed from loue, and yett my true loue crost,

neglected for bace gaine, and all worthe lost

for riches, then 't'is time for good to dy

when wealth must wed vs to all mi∫ery;

Si:

if you will butt stoutly tell your mother

you hate him, and will match wt any other

she can nott, nor will goe about to cro∫s

your liking, ∫oe to bring your endle∫s lo∫s;

Mu:

Alas I haue vrg'd her, till she wt teares

did Vowe, and grieue she could nott mend my state

agree'd on by my fathers will, wch beares

∫way in her brest, and duty in mee; Fate

must haue her cour∫es, While most wreched I

wish butt ∫oe good a fate as now to dy,

Si:

wish nott ∫uch ill wch all wee ∫uffer must

butt take ∫ome hope, the Gods ar nott vniust,

my minde doth giue mee yett, you shall bee blest,

and ∫eldome doe I faile, then quiett rest

Mu:

rest quiett, (o! heauens) haue you euer knowne

the paines of loue, and bin by him orethroune

to giue this coun∫ell, to adui∫e your freind

to impo∫sibilities, why to what end

speake you thus idly, can itt ere bee thought

that quiett, or least rest can now bee brought

to mee, while deere Phili∫ses thus is crost

who mi∫sing, all my hapines is lost,

Si:

you haue nott mist, nor lost him yett, Mu: I must

and that's enough, did I my ble∫sings trust

in your kind brests you fatall ∫isters, now

by your word decree to bee beestowd, and bow

to bace vnworthy riches, o! my hart

that breaks nott, word butt can ∫uffer all this ∫mart;

Si:

haue patience, Mu: I can nott, nor I will nott,

patient bee, ay mee, and beare this hard lott

noe I will grieue in spite of greife, and mourne

to make tho∫e madd who now to plea∫urs turne

Phili∫ses:

My deere Mu∫ella what is itt doth grieue

your hart thus much, tell mee, and still beleeue

while you complaine I must tormented bee

your ∫ighs, and tears (alas) doe bleed in mee,

Mu:

I knowe itt, t'is your lo∫s I thus lament;

Act Five

Enter Musella and Simena

Musella:

O eyes that day can see, and cannot mend

what my joys poison, must my wretched end

proceed from love? And yet my true love crossed,

neglected for base gain, and all worth lost

for riches, then 'tis time for good to die,

when wealth must wed us to all misery.

Simena:

If you will but stoutly tell your mother

you hate him, and will match with any other,

she cannot, nor will go about to cross

your liking, so to bring your endless loss.

Musella:

Alas, I have urged her, till she with tears

did vow, and grieve she could not mend my state,

agreed on by my father's will, which bears

sway in her breast, and duty in me. Fate

must have her courses, while most wretched, I

wish but so good a fate as now to die.

Simena:

Wish not such ill which all we suffer must,

but take some hope the Gods are not unjust;

my mind doth give me yet, you shall be blest,

and seldom do I fail, then quiet rest.

Musella:

Rest quiet? (O Heavens!) Have you ever known

the pains of love, and been by him o'erthrown

to give this counsel, to advise your friend

to impossibilities? Why, to what end

speak you thus idly? Can it e'er be thought

that quiet or least rest can now be brought

to me while dear Philisses thus is crossed,

who missing, all my happiness is lost?

Simena:

You have not missed, nor lost him yet.

Musella: I must

and that's enough; did I my blessings trust

in your kind breasts, you fatal sisters, now

by your decree to be bestowed, and bow

to base unworthy riches? O, my heart

that breaks not, but can suffer all this smart!

Simena:

Have patience.

Musella: I cannot, nor I will not,

patient be! Aye me, and bear this hard lot?

No, I will grieve in spite of grief, and mourn

to make those mad who now to pleasures turn.

Philisses:

My dear Musella, what is it doth grieve

your heart thus much? Tell me, and still believe

while you complain I must tormented be.

Your sighs, and tears (alas) do bleed in me.

Musella:

I know it, 'tis your loss I thus lament;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* hate him: while Wroth's biographer Margaret Hannay cautions against seeing an equation between Rustic and Mary Wroth's husband Robert Wroth, it is hard not to see some parallels given that Robert Wroth was a man much more enamoured of country life than culture; he was the King's forester and shared James's love of hunting; perhaps even more tellingly Ben Jonson remarked that Mary Wroth was 'unworthily married on a jealous husband'.

The 5 Act;/ [ fift Act.]

Mu∫ella, [ and] Simena;

Mu:

O eyes [ Eyes] that day can ∫ee, and can nott [ cannott] mend

what my ioy's [ ioys] poy∫on, must my wreched end

pro∫eed from loue, [ ?] and yett my true loue crost,

neglected for bace gaine, and all worthe lost

for riches, [ ?] then 't'is [ t'is] time for good to dy

when wealth must wed vs to all mi∫ery; [ :]

Si:

if [ Iff] you will butt stoutly tell your mother

you hate him,* and will match wt any other

she can nott, [ cannott,] nor will goe about to cro∫s

your liking, ∫oe to bring your endle∫s [ endles] lo∫s;

Mu:

Alas I haue [ I'haue]vrg'd her, till [ yt] she wt [ wth] teares

did Vowe, and grieue she could nott mend my state

agree'd [ agreed] on by my fathers will, wch beares [ bears]

∫way in her brest, and duty in mee; [ :] Fate

must haue her cour∫es, while most [ that] wreched I

wish butt ∫oe good a fate as now to dy, [ ;]

Si:

wish nott ∫uch ill wch all wee ∫uffer must

butt take ∫ome hope, the Gods ar nott vniust,

my minde doth giue mee yett, you shall bee [ shalbee] blest,

and ∫eldome doe I faile, [ miss] then quiett rest

Mu:

rest [ Rest] quiett, [ ?] (o! [ o] heauens) haue you euer knowne

the paines of loue, and bin by him orethroune [ orethrowne]

to giue this coun∫ell, to adui∫e [ and aduize] your [ yor] freind

to impo∫sibilities, [ ?] why to what end

speake you thus idly, [ madly] can itt ere bee thought

that quiett, or least rest can now bee brought

to mee, [ ?] while deere Phili∫ses thus is crost

who [ whom] mi∫sing, all my hapines is lost, [ :]

Si:

you haue nott mist, nor lost him yett, Mu: I must [ ,]

and that's enough, did I my ble∫sings trust

in your kind brests you fatall ∫isters, [ ?] now

by your hard harts decree to bee beestowd, [ beestowde?] and bow

to bace vnworthy riches, [ :] o! [ O] my hart

that breaks nott, yet butt can ∫uffer all this ∫mart; [ : /]

Si:

haue patience, [ :] Mu: I can nott, nor I will nott, [ :]

patient bee, [ ?] ay mee, and beare [ beare] this hard lott

noe [ no;] I will grieue in spite of greife, [ griefe] and mourne

to make tho∫e madd who now to plea∫urs [ plea∫ure] turne [ ; /]

Phili∫ses:

My deere Mu∫ella what is itt doth grieue

your hart thus much, [ ?] tell mee, and still beleeue

while you complaine I must tormented bee

your ∫ighs, and tears (alas) [ alas] doe bleed in mee, [ .]

Mu:

I knowe itt, t'is your lo∫s I thus lament;

I must bee maried, would my days were spent

Phi:

married! [ Married!] Mu: to Rustick my mother ∫oe commands

who I must yeeld to, beeing in her hands

Phi:

butt [ Butt] will you marry, [ ?] or show loue to mee

or her obay, and make me wreched bee [ :]

Page of Huntington manuscript.

I must bee maried, would my

Phi:

married! Mu: to Rustick my mother ∫oe commands

who I must yeeld to, beeing in her hands

Phi:

butt will you marry, or show loue to mee

or her obay, and make me wreched bee

Mu:

Alas Phili∫ses will you this doubt make

I would my lyfe to plea∫ure you for∫ake

hath nott my firmnes hetherto made knowne

my faith, and loue wch yett should bee more showne

if I might gouerne butt my mothers will

yett this last question euen my hart doth kill

Phi:

grieue nott my deerest, I spake butt for loue,

then lett nott loue your trouble ∫oe farr moue,

you weepe nott, that itt wounds nott haples mee,

nor ∫igh, butt in mee all tho∫e ∫orrowes bee,

you neuer cry, butt groanes most truly show

from deepest of my hart I feele your woe,

then heape nott now more ∫orrows on my hart

by thes deere tears, wch tasteth of all ∫mart,

noe griefe can bee wch I haue nott ∫ustaind,

and must for now dispaire hath conquest gaind;

yett lett your loue in mee still steddy rest,

and in that I ∫ufficiently ame blest

butt must you marry; Mu: allas my deere, I must

Phi:

I heere, and ∫ee my end: O loue vniust,

vngratefull, and forgettfull of the good

from vs receau'd, by whom thy faine hath stood,

thy honor still maintaind, thy name adorde,

wch by all others wt di∫grace was stor'd,

is this the great reward wee must receaue

for all our ∫eruice, will you thus de∫eaue

our hopes, and ioys; Mu: yett shall I one thing craue

Phi:

aske my poore lyfe all els I long ∫ince gaue

Mu:

that I will aske, and yours requite wt mine

for mine can nott bee if nott ioind to thine,

goe wt mee to the temple, and ther wee

will bind our liues, or els our liues make free

Phi:

to dy for you a new lyfe I should gaine

butt to dy wth thee were eternall paine

∫oe you will promi∫e mee that you will liue

I willingly will goe, and my lyfe giue,

you may bee happy; Mu: happy wth out thee

lett mee bee rather wreched, and thine bee

wt out thee noe lyfe can bee, nor least ioy

noe thought butt how a ∫ad end to inioy

butt promi∫e mee your ∫elf you will nott harme

as you loue mee, Phi: lett mee impo∫e that charme

likwi∫e on you Mu: content I ame agreed

Phi:

lett's goe alone noe company wee need

Mu:

Simeana she should goe, and ∫oe may tell

the good, or heauy chance that vs befell

Phi:

wt all my hart Si: butt what will you tow doe

both dy, and mee poore maiden quite vndoe

Phi:

I must be married, would my days were spent!

Philisses:

Married!

Musella: To Rustick; my mother so commands

who I must yield to, being in her hands.

Philisses:

But will you marry? Or show love to me,

or her obey, and make me wretched be?

Musella:

Alas Philisses, will you this doubt make?

I would my life, to pleasure you, forsake.

Hath not my firmness hitherto made known

my faith, and love which yet should be more shown

if I might govern but my mother's will.

Yet this last question even my heart doth kill.

Philisses:

Grieve not my dearest, I spake but for love,

then let not love your trouble so far move.

You weep not, that it wounds not hapless me,

nor sigh, but in me all those sorrows be;

you never cry, but groans most truly show

from deepest of my heart I feel your woe.

Then heap not now more sorrows on my heart

by these dear tears, which tasteth of all smart.

No grief can be which I have not sustained,

and must, for now despair hath conquest gained.

Yet let your love in me still steady rest,

and in that I sufficiently am blest,

but must you marry?

Musella:

Alas my dear, I must.

Philisses:

I hear, and see my end: O love unjust,

ungrateful, and forgetful of the good

from us received, by whom thy fame hath stood,

thy honour still maintained, thy name adored,

which by all others with disgrace was stored.

Is this the great reward we must receive

for all our service? Will you thus deceive

our hopes, and joys?

Musella:

Yet shall I one thing crave.

Philisses:

Ask my poor life; all else I long since gave.

Musella:

That I will ask, and yours requite with mine,

for mine cannot be if not joined to thine.

Go with me to the temple, and there we

will bind our lives, or else our lives make free.

Philisses:

To die for you, a new life I should gain,

but to die with thee were eternal pain.

So you will promise me that you will live.

I willingly will go, and my life give.

You may be happy.

Musella: Happy without thee?

Let me be rather wretched, and thine be.

Without thee no life can be, nor least joy,

no thought but how a sad end to enjoy,

but promise me yourself you will not harm,

as you love me.

Philisses:

Let me impose that charm

likewise on you.

Musella:

Content, I am agreed.

Philisses:

Let's go alone; no company we need.

Musella:

Simena, she should go, and so may tell

the good, or heavy chance that us befell.

Philisses:

With all my heart.

Simena: But what will you two do?

Both die, and me poor maiden quite undo?

Philisses:

[end of Huntington manuscript]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mu: Wroth adds this passage in Penshurst to offer a fruther explanation for Musella's determination to follow her mother's wishes and marry Rustic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phi: at this point, Huntington ends. The fact that this last page has the speech prefix for Philisses, which follows on directly in Penshurst, may indicte that there are missing pages from huntington, or simply that Wroth for whatever reason abandoned Huntington and produced a complete text in Penshurst -- I note this despite myself and Marion Wynne-Davies arguing elsewhere that one can see Huntington as perhaps deliberately unfinished or at least as being thematically suggestive in its unfinished state.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mu:

Alas Phili∫ses will you this doubt make

I would my lyfe to plea∫ure you for∫ake

hath nott my firmnes hetherto made knowne

my faith, and loue [ ?] wch yett should bee more [ showld more bee] showne

if I might gouerne butt my mothers will

yett this last question euen [ eu'n] my hart doth kill [ :]

Phi:

grieue nott my deerest, I spake [ speak] butt for loue,

then lett nott loue your trouble ∫oe farr moue,

you weepe nott, that itt wounds nott haples mee,

nor ∫igh, [ ∫igh] butt in mee all tho∫e ∫orrowes bee,

you neuer cry, butt groanes [ groans] most truly show

from deepest of my hart I feele your woe, [ :]

then heape nott now more ∫orrows on my hart

by thes deere tears, wch tasteth [ taste] of all [ endles] ∫mart,

noe griefe can bee wch I haue nott ∫ustaind,

and must for now dispaire hath conquest gaind; [ gain'd,]

yett lett your loue in mee still steddy rest,

and in that I ∫ufficiently ame [ am] blest

butt must you marry; Mu: allas my deere, I must [ O these words deny

or heere behold your poore Phili∫ses dy:]

[ Mu:*

I wowld I could deny the words I spake

when I did Rusticks mariage offer take

hopeles of you I gaue, my ill con∫ent,

and wee contracted were wch I repent

the time now cur∫e, my toungue wish out wch gaue

mee to that clowne wt whom I wed my graue;]

Phi:

I heere, and ∫ee my end: O loue vniust,

[ and careles of my hart putt in your trust]

vngratefull, and forgettfull of the good

from vs [ mee] receau'd, by whom thy fame hath stood,

thy honor still maintaind, thy name adorde,

wch by all others wt di∫grace was stor'd,

is this the great reward wee must [ I shall] receaue

for all our [ my] ∫eruice, [ ?] will you thus de∫eaue [ deceaue]

our [ my] hopes, and ioys; Mu: yett shall I [ lett mee] one thing craue [ :]

Phi:

aske my poore lyfe[ ;] all els I long ∫ince [ long ∫ince I] gaue

Mu:

that I will [ will I] aske, and yours requite wt mine

for mine can nott [ cannott] bee if nott ioind to thine,

goe wt mee to the temple, [ Temple] and ther wee

will bind our liues, or els our liues make free

Phi:

to [ To] dy for you [ thee] a new lyfe I should gaine

butt to dy wth thee were eternall paine

∫oe you will promi∫e mee that you will liue

I willingly will goe, and my lyfe giue,

you may bee happy; [ :] Mu: happy wth out thee [ ?]

lett mee bee [ mee] rather wreched, and thine bee

wt out thee noe lyfe can bee, nor least ioy [ ,]

noe thought butt how a ∫ad end to inioy [ enioy]

butt promi∫e mee your ∫elf you will nott harme

as you loue mee, [ ;] Phi: lett mee impo∫e that charme

likwi∫e on you [ :] Mu: content I ame agreed

Phi:

lett's [ Lett's] goe alone[ ,] noe company wee need

Mu:

Simeana [ Simena] she shall goe, and ∫oe may tell

the good, or heauy chance that vs befell [ .]

Phi:

wt all my hart [ Phi: I ame content your will shall bee obayd

till this lyf chang, and I in earth am layd;/]

Si: [ I feare the wurst] butt what will you tow doe

both dy, and mee poore maiden quite vndoe

Phi: *

Dy? noe, wee goe for euer more to liue,

and to owr loues a ∫acrifies to giue

Mu:

Our tears, and ∫orrows wee will offer ther,

and of owr offrings you shall wittnes beare,

the truest, and most constant loue ther shall

in your ∫ight end, and yett shall neuer fall,

Phi:

∫uch faith wee'll ∫acrifies as non can touch

wth once reporting ther could bee too much

Si:

I know nott what you meane, butt I'le along;

Phi:

Lett's haste for heere com ∫om may doe vs wrong; ex:

Li∫sius, Dalina, Arcas,

Rustick.

Li:

Arcas ist po∫sible itt is to day?

Ar:

Itt is, Mu∫ella now can beare noe ∫way

Rustick shall haue her, hee's the ble∫sed man

yett cannott gett her loue doe what hee can;

Da:

I'me ∫orry for Phili∫ses; Li: truly ∫oe am I

what then a lost loue is more mi∫ery;

Ru:

Li∫sius, Dalina, Arcas well mett to day

I must bee maried, pray bee not away

butt ∫ee vs ioin'd, and after dine wt vs

Wher is Phili∫ses? I hope hee'll nott mi∫s

this is a iolly day, this my day is.

Li:

I will nott faile; must wee nott fech the bride

Ru:

Yes marry from her mothers wher w'abide, ex:

Da:

How well this bu∫ines doth beecom this man?

how well hee speaks word mariage? and began

in as good forme his nieghbours to inuite

as if hee studie'd maners, yett att night

I'le vndertake much mirth will nott apeere

in faire Mu∫ella, she'll showe heauy cheere;

Ar:

This t'is to looke ∫oe high, and to dispi∫e

all loues that ro∫e nott plea∫ing in her eyes

now she that ∫oar'de aloft all day, att night

must roost in a poore bush wt ∫mall delight;

Li:

I neuer knew this in her; butt t'is true

she lik'd nott of the loue proferd by you,

and for refu∫ing that she could nott like

noe man aught blame her, or her mind dislike

butt you haue other qualities to moue

a iust dislike, you loue cro∫s baites in loue:

I was beeholding to you when time was

butt I inioy her now: {*} Da: com lett that pas,

Arcas is knowne, and I dare lay my lyfe

you haue bin meddling, and haue cau∫'d ∫ome stryfe

lately about Mu∫ella, butt take heed,

if itt proue ∫oe parchance you'll want your meede,

Li:

Iff itt bee found thou shallt noe longer liue [ = with slash through it]

then while thou dost her ∫atisfaction giue,

Arcas:

Bee nott ∫oe cholerick, till you know the truthe,

I haue left that foule error of my yuthe;

Da:

Hardly I doubt for I ∫aw you last day

∫neaking, and priing all along this way,

t'was for noe goodnes that I'me Very ∫ure

for from a childe you cowld nott that endure;/ ex:

Climena, Lacon;

Cli:

Lacon how fare you, now? Mu∫ella must

this day bee maried is nott loue vniust

to ∫uffer this distastefull mach to bee

against her choy∫e, and most against poore thee?

La:

Nott against mee I neuer hop'd then how

doth Cupid wrong mee though she marry now,

Yett thus is loue vniust to lett her wed

one who she neuer ∫ee's, butt wisheth dead,

Soe I, although for her I oft haue di'de

grieue for her lo∫s, nott that I was deni'de;

I was vnworthy of her, and she farr

too worthy for this clowne; Ô she, the starr

of light and beauty, must she, louely she?

bee mach'd to Rustick bace, vnworthy hee?

Silluesta,

Mu∫ella to bee forc'de, and made to ty

her faith to one she hates, and still did fly?

itt showld nott bee, nor shall bee, noe noe I

will re∫cue her, or for her ∫ake will dy,

haue you yett ∫eene Mu∫ella heere to day?

Cli:

Noe butt I heere she pa∫sed by this way

wth faire ∫imeana both by breake of morne

wth humble minds farr from theyr wounted ∫corne

to offer theyr last rights of maiden thought

chaste Mistress: ie Silvesta's mistress Diana, goddess of chastity (and hunting). At this point Climeana claims that Venus has captured their future, though Venus will in the end save them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temple of Loue: another masque-like scene, which would require some staging and which again emphasises that Wroth had a performance text in mind, not simply a reading text.

to your chaste Mistre∫s* Venus now hath bought

theyr future time, how thinke you of this chang?

t'is better ∫ure then still alone to range;

Sill:

Itt's well you think ∫oe, yett my thinks you can

make a cleane shift to liue wth out a man;

ex:

Phili∫ses Mu∫ella offring

in the Temple of Loue;*

Venus, and great Cupid heere

take owr ∫acrifices cleere

wher nott rights wee only giue

butt our harts wherin you liue,

tho∫e true reliques of firme loue

on yor allter still to moue,

wher non ∫uch; non ∫oe ∫incere

to your triumph light did beare,

yours they liu'd while ioye had lyfe

dying; heere will end all strife

truer loue, or truer harts

neuer perish'd by your darts;/

Phi: to Venus,

Venus only Queene of loue

take thes pa∫sions wch I proue

take thes tears, this vowe take

wch my death shall perfect make

butt Mu∫ella my hart lou'd

her lo∫s hath my ioye remou'd,

hers I liu'd, hers now I dy

crown'd wt fames eternity

thus your force shall glory haue

by Phili∫ses louing graue;

Mu: to Cupid;

Cupid Lord of loue, and harts,

king of thoughts, and louing ∫marts,

take thes offrings wch I giue,

and my lyfe wch new shall liue

Earthe to meane for ∫uch a truthe

shall in death haue lasting yuth,

noe decay, noe strife, noe fate

shall disturb that during state

Lyfe I offer to true loue

then accept this end I proue.

Time non ∫uch did know, nor shall,

∫ee ∫oe willingly to fall,

In Phili∫ses I did liue,

hee departing lyfe I giue;

Phi: Mu:

Fame heerafter ∫well wth pride,

neuer loue thus liu'd, thus died:

Phi:

Now my Mu∫ella, and in death butt mine

take this last farwell in wch glorys shine,

Loue butt to you could neuer bee ∫oe true

and death then lyfe I chu∫e ∫ince t'is for you,

my lyfe in you I had, my ioye, my blis,

and now for you, and by you my end is,

yett keepe your promi∫e, euer happy bee

you may bee fortunate, and outliue mee,

Mu:

That I beeleeue, when I doe thee outliue

shame shall insteed of fame my triumph giue;

I lou'd as firmly as thou could'st mee loue,

and can as willingly a deaths wound proue;

butt you forgett the promi∫e you did make,

and ∫ince condition made, yor ∫elf first brake

I ame relea∫'d, your word forgott, and broke

my hand shall first conclude that ble∫sed stroke

vnto thy loue, and mine ∫ince itt is thus

farewell poore world lifs liuing bides in vs;

Silluesta:

O hold your hands, I knew your minds, and haue

brought fitter meanes to wed you to yor graue,

lett nott tho∫e hands bee spotted wth your blood

butt ∫ince your desteny is nott wth stood

potion: from this point on the plot takes on some of the characteristics of Romeo and Juliet, but in Love's Victory, as is appropriate for a tragicomedy, the ploy using a potion that feigns death works flawlessly and the lovers are revived and reunited.

drink this ∫weet potion* then take leaue, and dy

imbracing thus you dead shall buried ly;

Phi:

Freindship what greater ble∫sing then thou art

can once de∫end into a mortall hart?

Siluesta freind, and priest doth now apeere

and as our loues, lett this thy deed shine cleere;

Mu:

Neuer more fitt did freindship meet wth need

blest bee thy days, most ble∫sed bee this deed;

Sim:

What haue you kil'd them for this you must dy,

Sill:

And dying for them, I dy happyly

who would outliue them? who would dying fly

that heere beheld loue, and loues tragidy,

butt first vpon loues alter lett's them lay

ther to abide till theyr new mariage day,

then lead mee to tho∫e who my lyfe must take

butt ere I dy ∫ome ioyfull hart shall ake; ex:

Rustick wth sheapherds, and

sheapherde∫ses redy to fetch

the bride; Ru:

Now is the time aproch'd; what think you now?

is't nott a trim day? what clowd showes a brow?

all att my fortune cleere, all ∫mile wt ioye

sheepe, goates, and Cattle glad that I inioye

Da:

I never lov'd him, now I hate him fy

to thinke Musella by this beast must ly,

Ru:

Come lett's alonge, and quickly fetch the bride

mee thinks I long to haue her by my ∫ide

how now? what, stumble t'is nott fatall is't?

his: Wynne-Davies emends to 'him'. The line from Lissius, in response to Rustic's question about a stumble, says it is a piece of good luck that Rustic has lost ground to Philisses. This image is continued in Lissius's reference to tripping.

Li:

good luck that you to his* the grownd haue mist;

Da:

A farr wur∫e ∫igne then this itt doth foretell

butt yett haue courage all things may proue well,

Ru:

Nay 'pray re∫olue mee I beegin to feare

Li:

To feare; fy man can trips make hope forbeare

on, on, haue mettle will you now wax fainte.

you who to vs a hapy lyfe must paint

Ru:

This is nott all this morne a Cowe did low,

and that ill luck foretells I truly know,

Da:

had she nott lost her caulf; {*} Ru: her caulf fy noe

she had a dainty one as I will showe

att my returne, and they together cam,

and while she low'd the youngling ∫uck'd her dam;

Li:

And ∫oe might hurt her wheratt she did cry

and for your help did low ∫oe bitterly,

Ru:

Well come what will wee now may nott goe back

Da:

Yes Very well for her con∫ent you lack:

Ru:

Come then, away, the pretious time doth wast

Simeana; Silluesta:

Sim:

Heere: first my newes for itt may stay your haste,

Yor bride a bridegroome new, wth ioy hath

gain'd,

and both for wedding bed a tombe obtain'd,

heere is the prist that marriéd them to death,

and I the wittnes of theyr pa∫sing breath;

Ru:

How, is she married, and thus cou∫send mee,

and dead, and buried, how can all this bee?

Sill:

Fetch forth her mother, and you then shall know

the cau∫e, and actor of this cruell blowe,

Li:

O heau'n was she too rare a prize for earth.

or were wee only hapy in her birth?

Da:

Only made rich inioying of her ∫ight;

she gon, expect wee nothing butt ∫ad night;

Fyllis:

What glory day did giue vs was to show

the Vertu in her beauty ∫eem'd to grow;

Cli:

Sweet loue, and freindship in her shined bright,

now dim'd ar both ∫ince darkned is her light

La:

Noe worthe did liue wch in her had nott spring,

and she thus gon to her graue worth doth bring:

Ru:

I lik'd her well, butt she nere car'd for mee

yett ame I ∫orry wee thus parted bee:

Sim:

Now heere of mee the mournfull'st end of loue

that hart for hart could finde, and hartles proue:

Phili∫ses, and Mu∫ella had lou'd long,

and long vnknowne wch bred ther only wrong,

att last di∫couer'd to theyr greatest ioy

this mach came cro∫s theyr deere hopes to distroy,

for she (alas) dispairing of her blis

agreed to marry Rustick and to mi∫s

noe cro∫s, nor froward happ, wch ∫ure wt him

she must incounter if in this streame ∫wim,

when this was dun they knew each others hart,

and by itt knew the thrid wch

led to ∫mart

they yett awhile reioicéd in theyr loue

butt too too ∫oone ther followd this remoue;

her mother hasty to conclud her will

apointed this ∫ad day showld yt fulfill

wch hath indeed fulfild a greater harme

then spite itt ∫elf could purchace wt her charme,

Mu∫ella finding that her giu'n con∫ent

prou'd thus her hell, her ∫oule did then lament

yett could nott gaine relea∫e butt that she must

looke as her mother lik'd (O force vniust),

Yett ∫oe itt was, and this procur'd her end

her mother growne her foe, and death her freind

her freind she cho∫e; Phili∫ses who did loue

as much as she, and she as much did proue

of loue, and paine as hee who felt all ∫mart

Vow'd ∫ince they might nott ioine butt rather part

they yett as most vnfained louers wowld

louingly dy, and ∫oe firme louers showld;

Vnto the Temple then they tooke theyr way,

together wept, together did they pray

together offred; now Silluesta you

must tell the haples end wch did en∫ue;

Sill:

And ∫oe I will; ther loues they gaue, and liues

wch showld haue finisht bin by too sharp kniues

prouided clo∫ely tho∫e too to haue kild

who haue the world wt loue and wounder fill'd,

butt I came in, and hindred that sharp blow,

though nott theyr wills more honor I did owe

to that (in loue alone) vnhapy paire

and brought theyr ends more quiett, and, more faire,

a drink I gaue them made theyr ∫oules to meete

wch in theyr clayie cages could nott; ∫weet

was theyr farewell while ∫orrow then v∫'d art

to flatter ioye till they noe more should part,

theyr bodys likwi∫e ioin'd by vs, ar place'd

vpon loues alter, nor from thence displac'd

by Vow must bee till all you louers lay

this loue kild couple in theyr biding clay,

this I haue dunn, and heere ame I to dy

if ∫oe you plea∫e, and take itt willingly,

Ru:

Nay if she lou'd an other farwell she

I'me glad she by her death hath made me free

clownish: boorish

not Sorrow: ie it is shameful that Rustic is not sorrowful when everyone else is over Musella's death.

Li:

Is this your care, O clownish* part, can you

for shame nott ∫orrow,* when owr harts doe rue

Ru:

I'me free I care nott; {*} Sill: the like is she then now

Ru:

she is for mee, and heere I di∫auow

all promi∫es wch haue beetweene vs past

or haue bin made by her, att first, or last

to mee, and thus I doe relea∫e her, now

may I ∫eeke one and plea∫e my ∫elf in loue

I'le non but ∫uch who∫e hart my loue shall moue; ex

Si:

she's hapy yett in death that she is free

from ∫uch a worthles creature; can this bee

∫uch Vertu should in her faire brest abound,

yett to bee ti'de wher noe worthe could bee found;

Li:

Thus haue your yeers your hapines outwourne,

and brought vntimely death to your first borne

can you indure this change, and heere vs ∫ay

your forced mariage brought her funerall day;

The Mo:

If the true grief I feele could bee exprest

by words, or ∫ighs I showld my ∫elf detest

∫orrow in hart, and ∫oule doth only bide

and in them shall my woe bee iustly tride,

yett iustice doe I craue of this Vild paire

wch were the founders of my endles care

Arcas first plotted itt wt skillfull art

to ruin mee, and liuing eat my hart

hee told mee that Mu∫ella wantonly

did ∫eeke Phili∫ses loue, alas only

the speach of that did inly wound mee ∫oe

as stay I could nott, nor the time lett goe

butt ∫ent for her, and forc'd her to con∫ent

to finish that wch makes vs all lament,

and mee to dy, O mee wth grief, and shame

that thus de∫eruedly I beare this blame;

Silluesta who theyr liues brought to an end

must al∫o ∫uffer, death alone my freind

shall mee relea∫e, thes things I hope you'l doe

wch dunn wt age, and griefe I'le ∫uffer too;/

Li:

Thes must, and shall bee dunn, and rites

parformd to theyr deere bodys, and theyr sprits

now to the Temple, and theyr bodys View

then giue thes, iudgment, biding ioye adue; ex:

The Forester;

Vnder a hedg all dead, to rest I lay'd

my body by dispaire wholy decay'd

when sleepe noe ∫ooner did my eye lids clo∫e

butt haulf distracted wt a dreame, I ro∫e,

my thought I ∫awe Siluesta's faire hands ty'de

fast to a stake wher fire burnt in all pride

to kis wt heat tho∫e most vnmached limms

wher Vertu wth her shape like habitts trims

her: ie Silvesta is so virtuous that Virtue dresses herself in Silvesta's clothing

The Temple: this is the play's most elaborate scene, though it can be staged quite simply and effectively in the Hall of a house like Penshurst Place, where a highly successful performance took place in 2014 presented by the Globe Theatre's 'Better Read Than Dead' education team.

her ∫elf wt her;* while she, alas faire she

should to tho∫e flames a ∫acred ofring bee,

this dreame par∫waded mee to ∫eeke her out,

and ∫aue her, or to free mee from the doubt,

and ther I ∫ee her to the Temple goe

I'le after, and my lyfe att her feete throwe,

The Temple,* and the dead

bodys on the Aulter, the

sheapherds, and sheapherde∫ses

casting flowers on them awhile

Venus apeers in glory they ∫ing

this ∫ong;/

Sorow now conclude thy hate

more can nott bee dunn by fate

Griefe abandon thy curst skill

loue hath now found means to kill

Louers heere example take;

faith in loue showld neuer shake

Only death hath force to part

louers bodys by his dart

butt theyr spiritts higher fly

death can neuer make them dy

butt ther ∫oules wt pure loues fire

will to heaunly blis aspire;/

The Priests

Now must wee iudg the' offenders for this deed

and each one punnish, thus itt is decreed,

Silluesta greatest in the fault must bend

her spiritt first vnto her owne ∫ought end;

Wth flames of fire, as she wth flames of Zeale

did act this, she must now her last day ∫eale,

death she procur'd, and for death, lyfe shall giue

Sill:

T'is iustice, thus by death a=new I liue;

my name by this will win eternity

for noe true hart will lett my meritt dy;

Fo:

I must inioye my death e're this bee dunn;

bright Venus I bee∫eech thee, and thy ∫unn

to looke on mee, your true, though luckles slaue,

and View the hart my faith to firm loue gaue

∫aue ∫weet Siluesta, who∫e youth fram'd this deed

lett nott her Vertu, as offences speed,

or though by law she haue de∫eru'd this dombe

lett mee for her obtaine her 'pointed tombe,

I am more fitt to dy, and ∫uffer farr

lyfe wt my ∫orrows are att endles warr,

be∫ids the law allowes if one will dy

for others fault, his death may theyr lyfe buy,

lett mee first beg itt, pay itt then wth lyfe

death for her ∫ake shall plea∫e, and end the stryfe

Venus,

Poore Forester thy loue de∫erueth more

for in thy hart true firmnes liu'd in store,

butt ∫ince you will her lyfe wth your lyfe buy

you must inioye death wee can non deny

that thus doe claime itt, she's by you made free,

and you for her must now my offring bee,

Fo:

Gode∫s of harts you thus haue dun mee right

now shall my faith to honor you shine bright.

Sill:

Thanks is your due for ∫auing mee from death

did I nott rather hate then loue this breath,

yett shall this bounty gaine in my chast hart

to yor de∫arts a kind, and thankfull part;

For:

death, hapy death, ∫ince she for whom I dy,

doth pitty mee, and weighs my constancy,

could I liue ages 't' would nott bee ∫oe good

as now to dy wth thanks giu'n for my blood;

Then farwell world; death wellcom as new lyfe!

Silluesta thanks mee, and giues mee this wyfe

Mo:

You ∫acred Priests parforme the{yr erased} latest due

to theyr dead bodys, and my ioys adue,

Pri:

Rustick before vs heere di∫claime the right

sprit: spirit: something more like Soul.

in lyfe was tyde to you now to her sprit,*

Ru:

I loue noe sprites nor tho∫e affect nott mee

she lou'd Phili∫ses; therfor she is free

were she aliue she were her owne to chu∫e

thus heer to her all claime I doe refu∫e

Pri:

Phili∫ses of vs take Mu∫ella faire

wee ioine your hands, ri∫e and abandon care

Venus hath cau∫d this wounder for her glory,

and the Triumph of loues Victory;

Venus

Louers bee nott ama∫'d this is my deed

who could nott ∫uffer yor deere harts to bleed

come forth, and ioy your faith hath bin thus tride

who truly would for true loues ∫ake haue dy'de,

Silluesta was my instrument ordaind

to kill, and ∫aue her freinds by wch sh'hath gaind

immortall fame, and bands of firmest loue

in theyr kind brests wher true affections moue;/

Then all reioyce, and wth a louing ∫ong

conclude the ioye hath bin kept downe to long;/

The mo:

Ioy now as great as was my former woe

shutts vp my speach from speaking what I owe

to all butt mine, for mine I ioye you are,

and loue, and blis maintaine you from all care

pardon my fault, inioye, and ble∫sed bee,

and children, and theyr childrens children ∫ee

Mu:

pardon mee first who haue your ∫orrow wrought

then take owr thanks who∫e good yor care hath brought

Silluesta, next to you owr liues ar bound

for in you only was true freindship found

Phi:

Mother, for ∫oe your gyfte makes mee you call

receaue my humble thanks wch euer shall

wt faithfull loue, and duty you attend

till death owr liues bring to a finall end,

and chast Siluesta take my lyfe when I

vngratefull proue to your worth=binding ty;/

Sil:=

Venus the pray∫e must haue who∫e loue to you

made her de∫end on earth, and your cares View

she ∫ent the drink hath weded you to ioye,

and in ioye liue, and hapines inioye,

chaste loue relieu'd you, in chaste loue still liue

and each to other true affections giue;

For you kind Forester, my chast loue take,

and know I grieue now only for your ∫ake; ex

Fo:

My ioys encrea∫e she grieus now for my paine

ah hapy profferd lyfe wch this can gaine,

Now shall I goe contented to my graue

though noe more hapines I euer haue;/

Li:

Now lett mee ask my ioye wch you must giue

Phili∫ses you may make mee dy, or liue

your Sister for my wyfe I ∫eeke, alone

I craue butt her, and loue makes her mine owne;

tow bodys wee ar yett haue butt one hart

then rather ioine then lett ∫uch deere loue part;

Phi:

My ∫elf from bli∫s I ∫ooner will deuide

then cro∫s your loues; then henceforth thus abide

ioind in firm loue, and hapines attend

your days on earth vntill your liues doe end

Da:

Rustick, what think you is this call'd faire play

Ru:

When Venus wills men can nott but obay

yett this I'le ∫weare I'me plainly cou∫end heere

butt t'is all one the bargaine may proue deere;

Da:

Yett you haue nott lost all this wreath you ∫ee

willow tree: Rustic must exchange the marriage garland for a mourning wreath, with the willow a symbol of unrequited love.

is prou'd your garland, this faire willow tree*

you now must reuerence, and brauly weare,

Ru:

I'le ∫ooner dy then ∫uch di∫grace to bear,

nay ∫ooner marry, and that now I deeme

farr wur∫e then death though slighter in esteeme

Da

I wowld I might butt name the hapy mayde

showld bee your wyfe; {*} Ru; yor ∫elf name and all's ∫ayd

Da:

Will you haue mee then; {*} Ru: rather then my lyfe

Da:

In trothe agreed, I'le proue a louing wyfe

Ru:

T'is all I ∫eek; now god giue you all ioye

and blest ame I who this ∫weet las inioy

Mu:

A good exchange, and euery one agreed,

Phi:

And as wee loue, and like ∫oe lett vs speed;

Venus;

Now ∫inge a ∫ong both priests, and all for ioye

and curst bee they your ble∫sed states anoye

Song: space is left on the page for a song which Wroth presumably intended to insert at this point but for some reason did not.

the ∫ong;*/

[ space = most of the page]

Cupid;

Now my warrs in loue hath end

each one heere inioys theyr freind,

and ∫oe all shall henceforth ∫ay

who my laws will still obay;

Mother now iudg Arcas fault

all things els your will hath wrought;/

Venus

[ above top margin]

Arcas, think nott your Villanny's forgott

butt ∫ince each now inioys, the better lott

doth fall to you; you heare must still abide

in thes faire plaines wher you shall neuer hide

the shame of faulshood printed in yor face

nor hence remoue, butt in the ∫elf ∫ame place

you did committ that error foule, and ill

ther your days left, wt griefe, and shame shall fill

your gnawing concience; this shalbee your dome

Ar:

O ∫acred Godde∫s lett my harts=∫ute come

beefor your eyes, rather o[ circumflex] lett mee dy

then heere remaine wth shame, and infamy,

this dying lyfe (alas) then death is wur∫e

nor can you lay on mee a greater cur∫s

Venus;

Your dombe is giu'n itt may nott bee recall'd

butt wth your trechery you must bee thrall'd;

And now all dutys ar parform'd to Loue

looke yt noe more owr powres by ∫corn you moue

butt bee the trea∫ures of loues lasting glory,

and I your Prince∫es Crownd wt Victory;/

Ar:

Thus still is ∫inn rewarded wth all shame;

and ∫oe lett all bee that de∫erue like blame,

I haue offended in the bacest kind

and more ill doe de∫erue then ill can find

I traitor was to Loue, and to my loue,

tho∫e who shall thus offend, like mee, shame proue; [ slash s] ex:

Finis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mens names: while this cast list again underlines the fact that Love's Victory was intended for performance, it is written in a hand almost certainly not Wroth's and possibly from a later date than the play's composition.

Mens Names*[ above the margin]

Philli∫ses in Love with Mu∫ella & beloved by her

Li∫sius in Love with Semiana & beloved by her

Fore∫ter in Love with Silve∫ta

Lacon in Love with Mu∫ella

Rustick in Love with Mu∫ella, Marrie∫ Dalina

Arcas a villan

Wemen Names

Mu∫ella in Love with Phili∫ses

Semeana Sister to Philli∫ses, & in Love with Li∫siu∫

Silve∫ta in Love with Forester, but ha∫ Vowed Cha∫tity

Climeana{Clemeana?} in Love with Li∫sius

Delina a fickle Lady, Marrie∫ Rustick

Fillis in Love with Philli∫ses

Mother to Musella

Venus

Cuipt

Prie∫ts